Viewing 13 posts - 31 through 43 (of 43 total)
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  • #11071
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Freedom, please teach your son now.  “Then” will be too late, esp if something should happen to you (God forbid.)  My Dad began teaching me carpentry when I was 8 and even though I’m a woman, I know how to build a complete house.  Even though at my age I need muscle-help, I know what to do.  Building sheds and other structures…even when we bought a house, I could tell if it were well built or not.  Other skills may mean the difference between life and death…again, please teach your son now.

    #11072
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    wildartist, my 19 year old little girl knows how to use tools better then he does. Since she was my first I would play ball with her and when I would work she would be right next to me and would get the hand tools and do thing with me. So she knows more about building thing then he does. I will start teaching him.

    #11084
    Profile photo of MartyMac
    MartyMac
    Survivalist
    member1

    Get this book from Amazon.  It’s a novel about what happens after an EMP attack.
    <div class=”data”>
    <h3 class=”title”>One Second After <span class=”ptBrand”>by Forstchen, William R.</span></h3>
    </div>

    #11097
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews
    #11099
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    “Freedom wrote: “..the people that learn how to fix, build, plant, cook without electricity, hunt & fish,…”

    I know people that have built their own house, made a road to their house in the dessert. Got goats and sheep, a tunnel with herbs and vegetables. Milking the goats and making their own cheese. Making powder  from extra  eggs; and flour with hand mill from wheat, corn and oats. Fishing from the river. Pumping water from the river that’s being used for the house, animals and vegetables.  Flash toilets  – water runs with gravity Fixing their own vehicle and everything else on the farm.
    One solar panel for some basic stuff like ham radio. (no cellular phone reception, no television, no internet)
    They’ve been living like that for 8 years now… With all their experience and everything in place – They are worried about the global economy.  Not being able to just sell a goat to replace a part of their water pump … needing to go back to basics and use a wheelbarrow to water their vegetable garden. Or not being able to fix a vehicle for lack of parts – and walk 100 km to town. They are planning on buying two donkeys (eat less than horses)

    Can you imagine? Only visiting a shop every two to three months. Not being able speak to other people for so many weeks at a time.  The funny part is- If things go really bad and some bad people decide to kill them and take their perfect ‘survival setup’ – The bad people will die very soon, because they will not be able to keep the plants alive. The baboons might kill the young livestock. You need knowledge and experience and the right state of mind to survive the harsh climate..

    #11103
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Many people who have homesteaded Alaska for many years are also remote & wonderfully self-sufficient but still do some “modern stuff”.  One used to park his van in our backyard, fly into our village airstrip in his Piper Cub about once a month, head for Fairbanks for shopping and mail, then back out a couple of hundred miles to home.

    Another couple we visited north of The Circle made one paid bush plane trip to Fairbanks per year, met all their medical and dental needs in a couple of days, shopped for groceries for the year, and went back home.  They would carry the perishables with them (had a community generator in their village so had a freezer) on the flight back, but mailed themselves all the non-perishables.  It arrived in a few days on the US Mail Plane…

    It used to be interesting for us to go to Sam’s Cub (a warehouse type grocery outlet with bulk groceries) and see people in from the bush, loading up their carts with goods from civilization…homesteaders, trappers, hunting guides, Inuits and Athabascans, the whole gamut.

    One woman we knew about had not been to town for five years and was happy about it.  So it’s all what you get used to, I believe.  And yes, it takes “knowledge, experience and the right state of mind…”

     

    #11114
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Leopard – if I were young again and had not traveled widely and had my adventures I would not be able to imagine not being able to visit a shop any time I wanted – or go anywhere I wanted. But now? I can definitely see the beauty in rarely leaving my little farm and the area immediately around me. Small-scale farming and self-sufficiency even at the level I practice now takes lots of time – andI enjoy it more than I ever would have imagined. Heavy public contact over the years for work had made me not so eager to seek out just any other random humans company.

    ‘Now I know how hard I will have to work all of the time. I probably can only do half the work I could 20 or 30 years ago, and it’s not like I’m fat and out of shape. I want the advantage of machinery and powered tools. Using a pit saw to make boards or cultvating a field with a hoe are not In my plans. I am going to figure out how to make things run. -‘

    But I agree with 1974 and Freedom. The irony is I am not as young as I used to be – yet I have no intention of living a hard scrabble existence if I can possibly help it when SHTF which is the most time consuming part of my own preps.Even ifyou have like-minded people in your ‘group’, not all are willing to start ‘practicing’ ‘the life’ very thoroughlynow – sadly.

    They are mostly much younger so they don’t have the same sense of urgency/same sense of how time really does pass so quickly. Most of those that I know that rae preparing with any sense of urgency/dogged persistence are close to 50 and older. So I proceed thinking how to accomplish the things I know will need to be accomplished, that i will find it harder and harder as I age (hopefully) to do on my own and with various labor saving equipment – and making as many friendships with others in my community that are older, see the same issues and planning for that.

    And, although I understand you don’t want your property to ‘stick out’ – and maybe best it looks run down or something I am very proactive on accomplishing some maintenance tasks now while I can get them done – and not putting them off. And, as I can putting up appropriate repair materials for future use. Teaching myself carpentry skills too as I go along.

    There is a reason our ancestors died young. Doing things only/completely by the old way wore them the hell out by 40 – and that’s with a bunch of kids to help with the labor. I plan to use technology where practical for as long as I can/then have backup plans if those technologies fail, even if it is hydro-powered, then pedal-powered or last horse powered machinery. I don’t want to spend my later years making candles. I’ll grow more or use stored oil seeds and my oil press to make oil for the lamps if the solar lights fail – hopefully. I want to thrive not simply survive. But…that takes lots of extra planning and concentration – and a network of friendships/community.

    #11150
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Awesome discussion. Here is my take on this:

    First of all I think it depends how serious the person is about preparedness. Some people might be OK if technology fails, they will face more serious problems that they are not prepared for. What just matters is that these people are aware of this. Can you still call them preppers? Uhm maybe? They do more than the unprepared so thats why we should call them preppers.

    But isn’t the idea of preparing to consider all scenarios and prepare for them as good as possible? I think this is where most of us stand and that’s why the “other” way of preparing looks way too risky for us.

    To be honest, I would not prepare to live a simple life and learn primitive skills if I wouldnt enjoy it. Im not so attached to life or scared of death that being worried about the future would give me enough motivation to learn to use primitive tools and grow my own food. I probably would be also just a “half hearted prepper” who is ready to be unprepared once technology fails if I wouldnt enjoy learning all of this.

    This brings me to the next… a bit more philosophical point. I believe preparedness and survival is about freedom. Nothing else. Just the ability we humans had for millennia to survive long enough to reproduce ON OUR OWN. I believe this also means to be more in touch with nature and try to see through the bullsh!t society or those who form opinions try to promote. This is why I enjoy learning about survival, because it gives me independence to a certain degree.

    I think its wrong that a lot of companies sell products with outrageous claims of keeping people safe just to make money. I also feel sorry for people who fall for this because they buy an umbrella to keep them safe from an approaching hurricane. But these types of people are creatures of comfort and not fit for survival anyway unless they change their attitude and wake up.

    I hope their gadgets help them to survive, but I doubt it. I have the same gadgets but I know my skills and knowledge are much more reliable and unless I get handicapped, can’t be lost.

    A quote I heard first from Selco that has become one of my favorite quotes:

    Omnia mea mecum porto
    “All that’s mine I carry with me”

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #11152
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Another couple we visited north of The Circle made one paid bush plane trip to Fairbanks per year, met all their medical and dental needs in a couple of days, shopped for groceries for the year, and went back home.  They would carry the perishables with them (had a community generator in their village so had a freezer) on the flight back, but mailed themselves all the non-perishables.  It arrived in a few days on the US Mail Plane…

    It used to be interesting for us to go to Sam’s Cub (a warehouse type grocery outlet with bulk groceries) and see people in from the bush, loading up their carts with goods from civilization…homesteaders, trappers, hunting guides, Inuits and Athabascans, the whole gamut.

    I would love to see and experience this. It can get pretty harsh and lonely out there, I have huge respect for these kind of people.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #11208
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Northern Cape South Africa – Going into winter,and with a bit off rain there will be flowers everywhere you look this year. If people wants to experience survival on the border of South- Africa and Namibia.. in the dessert. Welcome to contact me. https://www.google.co.za/search?q=namaqua+flowers&es_sm=93&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=pulcU5HWKcXe7AbRjoC4Bw&ved=0CDcQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=909

    #11213
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Leopard,

    I am sorely tempted to take you up on your offer.. but only if I can go armed. Free men are armed. Slaves are not. Even the ancient Romans knew this.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #11267
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    I’ve got a fairly big smile on my face – Well have a look at this link for example http://www.africanhuntingsafaris.net/gun-importation-south-africa.html But you need not hunt for your food. The fish in the river does not know humans and suck on your toes if you allow them.

    #11270
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Leopard,

    That is beautiful!

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