Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 39 total)
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  • #17983
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Some precautionary advice to all:
    Anytime you are lifting with mechanical devices it is important to know the lift capacity of the device and the weight of the object to be moved. Trying to lift and move things that exceed the capacities of the lift/jack/hoist can and will get you killed. Worn and or damaged equipment should not be used. Inspect your equipment before use. Never use untested equipment for man lifts.

    Never allow any body part to be under/below the object. Never believe an accident can’t happen to you.

    A few useful links and one eye opener.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=rigging%20safety%20tips&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CCEQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fsafety.lle.rochester.edu%2F520_training%2Fmechanical%2Frigging.pdf&ei=xSe5U9KhM8KtyASD3ICQBQ&usg=AFQjCNHcP6j0cGtMXKncMHcihJUmSWCmHQ&sig2=k6KRRhTzTA9GBJNMPERuzg&bvm=bv.70138588,d.aWw

    http://catalog.mazzellalifting.com/Indexes/Hoist/SafetyPrecautionsndashOverheadHoists.aspx

    http://www.klclutch.com/cranes/10-famous-crane-collapses/

    #18103
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thank you again, 74.

    Around here, everyone uses Warn winches. Do you know how Ramsey winches compare?

    #18105
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Anselm,
    Can’t really help you with that one.

    #29107
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tomorrow I am replacing the cast iron boiler located in the basement of my project house. It probably weighs 500 lbs. I’m going to pull it out in one piece and lower the new boiler down the stairs with my lifting equipment. I have a 2000 lb chain hoist, a 2000 lb shop crane, a 1000 lb motorcycle lift and several block and tackle to get the job done. Fortunately for me there is an outside entrance to the bsmt.

    #29108
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Good luck my friend, take your time, do it slowly and study it well before you start.

    #29110
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I have it figured out pretty well. The key is securing the shop crane outside at the top of the steps. I have an old roofing hook that I’m going to stick on the garage side door so it pulls linearly on the wall up to the the crane. I’ll use block & tackle as the line securing the crane. I’ll have to move the crane 3 times for each boiler, but it’s not a big job to move. I’m just glad I have the equipment to move the boilers and set the new one.

    #29112
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    Good luck on the move. It really sounds like a tough job. How long do you think it will take. I imagine setup and teardown will probably eat up most of the time.

    #29128
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Roadracer,

    There are lots of variables, I’m thinking a day for each piece. I might have to remove a wall section to get the old one out. That would add an hour or more and I haven’t cut anything loose yet. probably a couple of hours to cut it loose drain the system and set up the crane for the first lift.

    #29153
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    74, you are a better man than me. Good luck!

    #29179
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MtBiker,
    No not better, we just have different experiences. I just happen to have some ability with 3 dimensional projects.

    #29215
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    74, I am remembering a wood stove I had in my basement at my former house. The folks I bought it from delivered and installed it, but when we were moving it was on me being I didn’t hire movers, but rather did it ourselves. I wasn’t going to leave it behind and so my son and I hauled it up the stairs ourselves, carried it up the ramp onto the rental truck, and then back down into my garage here in VT where it still sits. I already had a wood stove in the new house and didn’t have an immediate use for the old one but figured it would come in handy post-SHTF. Fortunately I had a second set of stairs from the basement up into the garage so we didn’t have to carry it through the house itself to get it outside. We had a bulkhead too but that opened into the backyard which would have made for a walk all the way around the house vs coming out into the garage. It was one of those “ready, lift, ready, lift” exercises as we brought it up one step at a time. We survived to tell the tale.

    #29532
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Moving the old boiler. This boiler is about 600 lbs. With the aid of the lift I removed by myself. To actually move the boiler only took about 5 minutes. The whole process of cutting it loose and moving took an hour.

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    #29536
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The old boiler moved out of the way.

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    #29540
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Great job 74. This shows how important it is to own these type of lifts.

    #29543
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Congratulations on a successful lift. Now what do you do with it? 600#’s is a lot of metal to move anywhere. That’s well more than the little wood stove my son and I moved!

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