Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #15458
    Profile photo of Tsar Alexander
    Tsar Alexander
    Survivalist
    member4

    Thought some people on here may or may not enjoy reading and critiquing this piece I read on Cracked:

    http://www.cracked.com/article_21251_5-things-every-movie-gets-wrong-about-apocalypse.html

    What do you all think? I thought it was kind of funny :P

    #15467
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Some truth in it, which can start you thinking. Many people have read Jack London’s stories of the Gold Rush in the Canadian Far North, so descriptive of the long winters and hardships etc. The fact is, he was only in the area for a few months. Contracted scurvy from poor food choices (and probably too much alcohol), got sick with his teeth falling out, and had to be transported back to the Lower 48 via steamboat from St Michaels, Alaska, way down the Yukon River.

    Also the Athabascan Indians of Interior Alaska often starved in the winters. Their food was the original “Atkins Diet”–berries (IF they gathered and dried them during autumn), fish (again, usually dried for winter when the ice was too thick to catch any–we’re talking 4ft thick in winter), and game (usually lean, IF they could locate any.) I suspect much of it was from malnutrition (lack of vitamins, minerals and carbs) and not always lack of snowshoe hares and the occasional winter moose. Once the white men introduced alcohol, many Native cultures starved and spiraled down, due to not taking the time and hard work to prepare for winter. (In the late 1800’s the Inuit of the coast were almost wiped out due to “The Sleeping Time” when everyone drank themselves into a coma instead of prepping for winter.)

    We see a lot of diabetes among the people of India, simply because they eat mostly white rice.

    That is why one of our preps is multivitamins with minerals. Can tide you over when certain things are scarce. And plan to have some perennial fruits/veggies/herbs that supply our needs.

    Several other things in the article were also food for thought. Nuclear plants, for instance. We just have to do what we can to survive, and trust God for the rest. Life is terminal anyway, sooner or later.

    #15533
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Seems like they figured out what it might be like. I don’t think anyone here believes life after shtf would fit any of the movie themes. The fact that they published an article about shtf is interesting. Maybe they are recognizing the potential.

    The gasoline part is true. In one year after production it will all be degraded. Makes a reason to design steam powered cars, back to Stanley Steamers.

    #15561
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    I think it’s funny because of how correct the article is, or could be.

    Hollyweird has made post-SHTF living out to be constant gunbattles, cannibalism, and nomadic wandering.

    In most short and long term SHTF situations we can look back on, Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina, WWI & WWII for Europe, we can see certain things. And to (mis)quote FerFAL, “the world isn’t going to end, it’s just gonna get more complicated”.

    But that doesn’t sell theater tickets, sensationalism does.

    Max Rockatansky driving his “Interceptor” in a post-nukie world (Mad Max) sells tickets, Zombies have sold tickets even in the days of Bob Hope (The Ghost Breakers), every sort of worst case scenario (2012) will sell. People eaking out a living digging a garden, drying meat and drinking willow tea to cure headaches for your daily excitement wouldn’t sell.

    What so many forget is that so many of today’s necessities were designed back in the ancient days. Long before computers, we had gasoline. Where there is a will, there is a way. It wouldn’t take that much for a few of the old ‘engineer’s’ to get together over coffee and tell the kids how to make gasoline again the way they used to do.
    We have a large number of retired petroleum engineers in town, gents who have worked around the world pulling the oil out and making stuff with it.

    The knowledge won’t vanish just because the hurricane hits town, or the lights go out.
    There are enough ‘porta-power’ units rolling around here on the back of pickups (welders) that we could light up this corner of the state and keep refining with minimal interference. And believe me, welder units are EMP safe, there isn’t anything more dumbed down and stupid except a push mower or a NY Senator.

    I speak of refining? Yup, Sinclair, Wyoming. Sound familiar to anyone who’s bought gas at a Sinclair gas station?
    Yup, made right here. Oil gets trucked in, gas gets trucked out. It really can be that simple.

    Is it a long term solution, of course not but it is one method of beating the crunch until better can be had/built.

    How about shipping (land based)? The diesel locomotives may not work, but there are a number of working ‘steamers’ out there even today in collections, museums and the like. The UP 4014 “Big Boy” went through town recently for a rebuild, bringing it back online for historical purposes. Designed to pull long, brutally heavy loads across Nebraska and Wyoming (especially WY) the Big Boy’s were the muscle cars of the train world. And there are a few still running. The railroads are refurbishing these for historical purposes, for posterity and such. That doesn’t mean that they couldn’t be stoked up, steam pressure brought up and rolled across the country again tomorrow. Train Loco’s such as this could again quite easily transport materials across the country.
    All it would take is a well planned timetable (use an old one, save time figuring it out again) and accurate watches for the employee’s. And what is and has always been the one requirement of railroadmen? An accurate watch.

    #15820
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Don’t rely on gasoline. Think wood gas. This person makes wood gas generators.
    You can also Google “Producer gas.”

    Robin

    http://northernselfreliance.com/

    #15827
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Whirl,

    Fractional distillation of petroleum is pretty straightforward. Heat the raw petroleum and the volatiles evaporate off at different temperatures. Hook up a crude condenser (that looks exactly like the condenser on a moonshine still) and collect up your product. The only thing you really have to watch is your temperatures.

    “Coal oil” – kerosene – can literally be gotten from coal. Same deal. Heat the coal slightly in a vessel and the kerosene evaporates off. Re-condense. You got kerosene. That’s why it used to be called “coal oil”. And Kentucky has centuries worth of coal… if I remember right, Wyoming has their share too.

    Wood gasifiers have been around for a hundred years. Just read about how Volkswagen made a wood gasifier version of the Beetle during WWII… which I would love to have.

    Any diesel engine on the planet will run on vegetable oil if you dump in a bit of lye and wood alcohol (or even booze – ethanol. But that would be a waste of damn fine sippin whiskey. Not sure I could do it).

    Be nice to see those old steam trains pounding across the countryside again… seen one, once. It is a sight to behold. And steam engines are wonderfully crude compared to the precision of a gasoline engine. Wouldn’t be hard to cobble together a working steamer. After all, steam trains have been around for… well, I don’t rightly know. Guess I gotta look up when the first steam train went operational… wait one.

    Good lord… the first steam train that actually pulled people around was in 1804. That is 210 years ago. I think we could manage to replicate the basics given that the tech is over 200 years old. It might not be as efficient as the latest steamers that operated right before everything went diesel electric, but it would work…

    Oh, if you use steamers, you will need water towers in addition to those wonderful old full-hunter 17 jewel railroad watches…

    Okay, I’m a closet steam engine and pocketwatch dork… sue me.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #15833
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Malgus,
    Dork just isn’t the right descriptive.
    Delusional romanticism maybe better.

    #15851
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    74,

    I am many things…. but delusional ain’t one of them.

    However, I fully cop to being a romantic. I was probably born in the wrong century.

    It would be nice to see steamers chuffing around post-SHTF… diesel electrics took all the style and romance out of train travel. But, it probably won’t happen…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #15857
    Profile photo of Tsar Alexander
    Tsar Alexander
    Survivalist
    member4

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Malgus wrote:</div>74,

    I am many things…. but delusional ain’t one of them.

    However, I fully cop to being a romantic. I was probably born in the wrong century.

    It would be nice to see steamers chuffing around post-SHTF… diesel electrics took all the style and romance out of train travel. But, it probably won’t happen…

    Heh, I have to butt in, I admit I have had the same type of feeling before.While I enjoy modern comforts, I do sorely miss the idea that people once produced real art and had a positive idealism about the world (that was not post modern far left garbage).

    #15862
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    People still produce real art, you just don’t see it combined with commercial products or architecture. Back in the day of yore there was real wealth and money was spent producing visually appealing items intentionally. The day income taxes were instituted was the day the US started dying. The money that would have been spent in the creation of art in buildings and objects went to the government. Now if a company can save a fraction of a cent in the manufacture of a device they do it. Everything is made a cheaply as possible to increase profits. Personal wealth declined so less money can be spent on artful design. Now the only entities that can spend lavishly are the government and large corporations. Personal art is bought on a tee shirt.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.