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  • #44469
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Many are interested in tracing their genealogy and family histories. I can attest from personal experience that it can be very satisfying and rewarding (though not financially – no rich great great uncles with unclaimed estates). And I know a man that was researching some of the very WRONG lines in his genealogy – until he did DNA testing through Ancestry.com (23andMe is another popular company doing the same thing). He found out he had a very different genetic lineage than he had any idea about, and discovered the connection only after learning it existed genetically. Good reasons for doing genetic testing – right?

    As much as I’d really like to know about a couple of my own lines, there is no possibility either my wife or I will do any of that testing. Thank you Edward Snowden for revelations on how NSA, Yahoo, Google, Microsoft, Facebook and others are linked in the data collection business, and now, how DNA databases are being used by governments at ever level (local on up to federal and even international). To keep this brief, I’ll just include some links, and most of them also have other internal links inside some of them as well. It’s fascinating – and chilling. Note that these slides were internal top secret briefing slides from NoSuchAgency – these are NOT some outsider’s idea of what they THINK is going on inside – this is the real thing, according to Snowden, Wired Magazine, and a lot of others. And nobody inside FedGov seems to be bothering to dispute it.

    http://www.wired.com/2013/06/snowden-powerpoint/

    http://www.wired.com/2015/10/familial-dna-evidence-turns-innocent-people-into-crime-suspects/

    https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/05/how-private-dna-data-led-idaho-cops-wild-goose-chase-and-linked-innocent-man-20

    http://fusion.net/story/40034/the-social-network-for-people-who-want-to-upload-their-dna-to-the-internet/

    Finally,

    In late January, President Barack Obama announced what some have called a moonshot. The $215 million Precision Medicine Initiative seeks to transform the health care system to target therapies to patients according to their unique genetics and environment. The most ambitious part of the initiative is a proposal to enroll 1 million people in essentially a superstudy. Their genomes will be sequenced, their medical experiences will be chronicled through their electronic health records, and sensors worn by them will track their activities, behaviors and environmental exposures.

    http://geneticprivacynetwork.org/tag/dna-database/

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This topic was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #44482
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Too late for me. I’ve run a YDNA project for 12 years for a family genealogical & historical society plus I did an additional FamilyFinder test.

    #44485
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Yes, it really is sad. One more very neat, good thing hijacked for serious misuse. Many can say they’ve got nothing to hide, and I’m in that group. But unlike many who use that phrase, I’m not willing to open the doors and windows and have an open house for any and everybody that wants to come through and peek in every closet, drawer, cabinet, book shelf, bank account record, etc. I grudgingly give up some privacy by using some of the modern conveniences, but limit many of them that others don’t even think about. No “social media” (unless this counts), much computer protection, refusal of many (most) apps on my phone, wi-fi and blue tooth are normally “off” on my phone, location tracking is “off” (other than the obvious cell tower tracking capability we can’t avoid), etc. And I really did want to do the DNA testing for genealogy purposes. We were very close to doing it when it first became available, but my internal “caution” light started blinking and I did some research. Ooops! I know too much about relational databases and how they can be used, and just what NoSuchAgency can do with that building complex out south of Salt Lake City, as it sucks their power and water all day and night. Most folks don’t have a clue, or don’t care. And they aren’t even waking up after all the data breaches. Duh! Even the CIA director’s private email got hacked, according to the news today. Beyond the government(s), there are just too many people that consider it sport to ruin peoples’ lives in public, so they hack whatever they can just looking for stuff. It’s like the drone “pilots” stationed in the US that play video games on our soil, not at all emotionally connected to the human lives they snuff out halfway around the world – sometimes in the dozens at once (often wives, children, other innocents). “Ooops – missed one! But at least those ones won’t breed, hah hah! Oh well, I’ll get him next time.”

    I need to get off this soapbox. Sorry. Personal privacy and increasing lack of any soul on the parts of so many is just a very sore issue for me.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #44487
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Too late for many.

    Been in the military in the last 25 years?
    Been part of a serious crime scene, even exclusionary?
    You’re on file.

    There are any number of reasons, voluntarily and involuntary that someone is on file.

    I personally have never been tested, but I can’t say 100% that I haven’t either, unknowingly.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by Whirlibird Whirlibird.
    #44492
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I’m going to guess that everyone that has had a blood sample taken for medical reasons has their dna captured in a data base. Digital medical records are availible to all of the government agencies. About 8 years ago one my Dr offices insisted that a digital photo (mug shot) was necessary for my records. I was so pissed. The receptionist told me it was supposed to counter ID theft. Like someone could steal my insurance and unusual name then the go to the urologist for treatment. Ya I was real worried about that.

    Basically medical files are being used to get around any laws preventing centralized data bases with personal information.

    #44498
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    When mandatory DNA sampling happened in the military many refused to give a sample. True it would help to identify your remains but the further abuse of private information was a concern of many. Didn’t matter: “Give or Get Out” pretty much summed it up.
    Robin

    #44501
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    74 said:

    Basically medical files are being used to get around any laws preventing centralized data bases with personal information.

    While I do not have inside knowledge of what the picture looks like with civilian medical records, I have little personal doubt that it’s become almost the same as military medical records. People would be absolutely livid if they knew what is done, and what is available with military medical records (and that includes all their dependents). When Tommy Thompson became HHS Secretary and began working on HIPAA, my antennae shot straight up. And as it was implemented, I came to know that what activated my antennae had been spot on. There has become no doubt whatsoever that HIPAA was designed exactly for what I suspected – government access to everything about us. Patient privacy? What an absolute sick joke! It was the medical/physiological piece of the government’s all-knowing “pie,” with the other pieces also becoming electronic (phone calls, Skype chats, instant messaging, email, GPS coordinates at all times, etc.).

    The TV show “Person of Interest” is not at all science fiction, as videos from the government’s ARGUS camera and its associated software show – they look virtually identical to some of the images shown in “Person of Interest,” complete with colored rectangles around moving objects such as cars, pedestrians, etc. It’s actually quite eerie that those involved with the production of “Person of Interest” actually know so very much about what’s available in reality – yet they billed that as a science fiction story of sorts. I remember when “Hunt for Red October” was released, and an individual with significant rank and high experience in nuclear subs almost went ballistic when he saw what was disclosed in that movie (highly classified things).

    You want to have a P.O. Box for privacy? Great! It only keeps the rank amateurs from knowing where you really live. You still have to provide the government, through the Post Office, your physical address in order to have a P.O. box. And if someone asks if they can have something sent to your P.O. box in their name – even innocently as a surprise for their spouse – it MUST say “c/o” (meaning “in care of”) your name below the addressee’s name – or it won’t be delivered (assuming competent postal employees, which is a stretch!). Further, the Post Office electronically records deliveries to P.O. boxes (known fact, not supposition, details upon request). It would only take a little speculative contemplation on that process to start considering just how much they really do know about who’s sending what to whom.

    Of course now there are many databases on line that will happily supply your address (and other previous addresses), phone number(s), age, and other data, for free to ANY person that knows the URLs of such databases. Heck, at least one will even automatically pull up the Google Maps Street View photo of your house as part of the search results – all for free, with no sign in (except the user’s ever-present IP address and information about your browser, operating system, and who knows what else).

    Maybe I ought not to worry since the gummint already knows whatever they want to know, and I ought to just go satisfy my curiosity about my ancestry by doing the DNA testing. But the fact that the FBI had to go to Ancestry.com for Mr. Usry’s DNA, tells me that they haven’t evolved (yet) to where blood samples from a person’s annual physical are being DNA tested and stored in a database. 74’s supposition will likely become correct, just not yet apparently. So I’m not just handing over more than I absolutely have to. Just my 2¢.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #44569
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7
    #44575
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Yes, that link and the other additional links directly under the two “Prism” slides above, are all worth exploring.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

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