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  • #25163
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Here’s a great reality check about the difference between having plans to do something and actually doing it.

    http://thoughtsfromfrankandfern.blogspot.com/2014/09/im-going-to.html

    #25165
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thanks MountainBiker.
    Very good article, it would be smart always to TRY things that you want to do when SHTF, but to try it before SHTF.

    #25170
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Selco is right on spot. Finding opportunities to ‘experiment’ a bit is good. My wife & I recently went camping across the state of Alaska & we found plenty of opportunities to test new gear, hone cooking skills with open fire pit, identifying edible plants and fishing, navigation, etc. And most importantly working together in various environmental conditions to accomplish a task.

    #25194
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    You need to practice with everything you are planning to use in a SHTF so you know what works and what doesn’t. Thanks for the link.

    #25197
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    When it comes to things like gardening, when you actually do it you quickly find out that not every type of veggie you plant is going to like your soil/rainfall/temp/sun/shade/length of growing season combination, let alone the critters big and small that live where you do. In 2010 I lost my entire apple crop to a late frost. In 2011 I had a bumper crop. In 2012 I lost the entire crop again to a late frost. In 2013 I again had a bumper crop. This year the crop is a fraction of last year’s due to a pounding rain that knocked a major part of the blooms off the trees. Last winter killed an apricot tree I had. Late frosts have greatly diminished the fruiting of my black walnut tree some years. Part of the reason why I have planted a variety of fruiting trees and shrubs these past few years is so as to spread my risk and better assure at least something will come in. Over time I will plant more of what I see does well here. My rhubarbs (which I transplanted from the old place) love it here. They barely grew at the old place. You can’t know this stuff until you actually do it.

    #25199
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MountainBiker, Here in Miami, Florida the heat is a killer on veggies so from Nov to March is a good time to plant veggies here. In the summer I did grow tomatoes well and pineapples. I now have lemon, orange, lime, grapefruit, and starting three coconut trees. But growing veggies is not easy and growing enough to feed your family is even harder.

    #25300
    Profile photo of ronym
    ronym
    Survivalist
    member5

    @mountainbiker
    you can try Paul Gautchi’s “Back To eden” method
    this method will solving few important thing :
    1. retain or holding water when rain is coming
    so the plant will not flooded by water
    and in hot or summer season we still have much water in the ground for our plant to prevent the plant from completely “toast” by hot season ( this is important for young plant )
    2. preventing snow from freezing root plant
    wood chip are absorbing some sun heat, so the root will not freeze.
    it is okay if the brach are freezing but the root and some bottom brach must not freeze ( plant will grow again after snow are melt )
    3. supplying nutrition for plant from wood chip degradation
    ( we can add chicken manure, dead leaf, cow manure, etc for creating faster top soil )
    .
    if it combine with permaculture way
    our garden will last years ( or even century )
    without any artificial watering system or any artificial fertilizer
    or even take care much of them
    .

    .

    #25401
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks ronym. Is there a particular permaculture book that you’d recommend?

    #25402
    Profile photo of ronym
    ronym
    Survivalist
    member5

    @MountainBiker
    for some reason i prefer to see film / doc about permaculture
    sometimes book are too boring because of too much detail and lack of picture
    the process of permaculture also more clear in the form of film / doc also philosophy of permaculture
    .
    Bill Mollison film / doc are good for start
    because of 20 years or something of his research
    he describing 4 different setup based on different climate
    ( so we can adjust our permaculture garden to proper climate )
    also he describing much about permaculture in the simplest way
    but much in the detail about important aspect
    .
    Permaculture in dry land

    .
    Permaculture in Cool climate

    .
    Permaculture in Urban / city

    .
    permaculture in Tropical climate

    #25412
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Watched the videos, very good information on Permaculture. Thanks ronym

    #25417
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    My experience with the Back to Eden method is very mixed at best. First, if you don’t stir or disturb the ‘chips’ to some level you can experience mold growth.I have had some weird fungi sprout and grow – all depends on the source of the chips. Second, the decomposition of the chips can rob your soil of nitrogen and other things – again depends on the source/makeup of the chips. 3) Where the heck are you going to get a constant supply of wood chips you would need when SHTF?

    Permaculture is great idea but does take time to establish and, personally, don’t believe it is an efficient method when you need to collect your harvest for processing. Not to say some use would not be good – but to solely rely on this method to feed yourself and others- especially with little gardening experience – not a proponent myself. Each to his own.

    #25428
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Manure straw and other plants will definitely be easier to come by. When I lived in Maine I would.go to the beach and load seaweed into my truck for compost. It was pre moistened and filled with organisums so in broke down really fast.

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