Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #32913
    Profile photo of tukie2
    tukie2
    Survivalist
    member3

    You are at work in the middle of the week, and your family is scattered wherever they go on a normal basis. All phones, computers and vehicles die suddenly. Everything has to close down for the day because of the grid. The only way you can get home is to walk, and there is no way to contact the rest of your family. Do you guys have plans in place with your kids and spouses? What would you do? How hard would it be? Could they all get home safely before the rest of the society realizes there is a bigger issue?

    This is a worry somewhat for me, and I live more than an hour from town up in the mountains. I don’t have a BOB per se, but I do carry separate items in the doors of my truck. I would worry about my kids, but we have a meeting place, that did include me getting them in a State emergency in my truck. I’d have to take the horses, but it would be hours before I could find them, if ever.

    #32915
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tukie,
    You hit on the first major issue for a family. Have a plan for all major emergencies. If you need to get your kids onboard start with a fire emergency, then medical. Move on to shtf from there.

    #32929
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I have long thought that the time to expect a major SHTF grid down or similar level event would be on an ordinary workday in early winter when schools are in session (including private schools and colleges that tend to have longer holiday breaks and different winter/spring breaks than public schools). That is how the terrorists or nation-state that is attacking would yield the maximum chaos and damage. On average families are not as dispersed on holidays and weekends. Tuesdays through Thursdays are the most dangerous days in my opinion given the frequency of people taking long weekends, plus business travelers are mostly all heading home on Fridays.

    I say early winter because of the added impact of winter weather once modern amenities cease to function. Few people who live in northern climates even own any clothing and footwear designed for prolonged use in really cold/wet weather. What they own instead are clothes that look the part but are only geared for the typical short duration outside type usage.

    #32935
    Profile photo of tukie2
    tukie2
    Survivalist
    member3

    Hahaha..Mountain Biker, you would think that, but my family is invested in wool and Sorel boots. We have plans when we are up here, where to meet if there is a flood, etc. Nothing for forest fires, or if they need to get back up here. My elderly parents live in town, and I worry about them as well. They would be ok if they were left alone by outside influences, but wouldn’t have water. My kids know the secret route to start walking but from school they wouldn’t have equipment to get home…weather would be an issue for sure.

    #32939
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    this place(where I live) is deserted during the day most days of the week, everyone has gone to work and the kids are in school, you could easily believe SHTF has happened and we are the last humans left!!!

    British Survivalist.

    #32949
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Yes Tulie, I’ll bet most on this forum have clothing and footwear that’ll serve them well come SHTF, but we’re a very small part of the population.

    #32951
    Profile photo of dogcop
    dogcop
    Survivalist
    member1

    Our biggest issue would be the 35 mile walk…..25 years ago we could do it with loaded rucksacks, but today we are older and much more worn out. Not making it home, however is NOT an option so we would push on. I do have a get home bag, hubby does not see the point in toting one in his truck (yet, but i AM working on him). I have mapped out several routes home and am trying to get into better shape.

    #32964
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Dogcop,
    That sounds like at least a 2 day trip. Doing 2 mph @17 miles a day under a load and stress 8.5 hours of walking. Even on flat land that would be a haul for anyone that isn’t in practice. Get your hubby a 3 day bag, :)

    #32965
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    the normal distance I am away from home is anywhere from 8 -23 miles, maybe 4 times a year I am 100 miles from home attending some event. if I have to walk home the average Brit can walk 4MPH, I’m a bit older so probably more like 3MPH these days-thats on paved level roads, off road maybe on an uneven surface I’d be down to 2MPH, and in inclement weather, in the winter, in the dark I’d be down to 1MPH or less. I always carry a GHB-that’s permanently in my vehicle-stuffed behind the seats along with a walking pole.

    British Survivalist.

    #32966
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Don’t drive yourself to exhaustion. You can’t respond to an emergency requiring speed & strength. You could use yourself up and have diminishing capabilities after your first day of shtf. You will need energy day after day to evade, defend, attack, work or just keep moving.

    #32969
    Profile photo of dogcop
    dogcop
    Survivalist
    member1

    i too had figured on 2 days to get home, think i may make and store his pack in my truck, as we only work 1 mile apart, i could bring it to him? And agree that likely would be a weekday if attacked. My priority would be getting home without entering any highly populated area, i think that would be prudent….any suggestions on what weapons to carry? I would not wish to be robbed for my supplies but do not want to stick out like a sore thumb either

    #32970
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Dogcop,
    Depending on where you live a handgun is usually the best choice for effectiveness and concealablity. State laws determine how and when you can carry. If you have one already great! If not then you can enter the how and what to choose decision process.

    Almost every opinion and view point on the subject can be found on the following thread:

    http://community.shtfschool.com/forums/topic/need-help-choosing-a-ccw/

    #32976
    Profile photo of dogcop
    dogcop
    Survivalist
    member1

    thanks for the response, 74, hubby has cc, but cannot have one in his vehicle or on his person at work, so i may look into getting mine. thanks for the link too!

    #32981
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    One thing I added to my get home bag is sleeping bag. They have 4 for sale I think at Amazon. Like an emergency blanket they look like folded tinfoil. I always have an extra box of ammo for my 45 acp I always carry. Three days of emergency rations and a full canteen I also always carry. Folding shovel and fire starters round out the bag.
    Robin

    #33001
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Unless the SHTF event is an emp powerful enough to disable vehicles, then it isn’t likely that we’d be walking home. The grid could go down or the economy implode or any number of other things could occur and our vehicles would still work. On that basis keeping your tank full should be a deeply ingrained habit. I try to never let myself go below half a tank. I also keep an extra 60 gallons at home which I rotate through my mower (I use 2 – 3 gallons every time I mow) and add Stabil too. I do carry a backpack and assorted supplies in my truck at all times.

    In addition to keeping the gas tanks full, another item is to always have cash. There are many scenarios where credit cards and ATMs won’t work and so I always have a good amount of cash set aside. The value of cash may quickly diminish within a day or two of the event but many will be slow in figuring that out and so you could buy yourself some ability to act during that narrow window if you have cash.

    Of course I write this sitting 850 miles from home which is more than two full tanks of gas, so my survival at the moment would depend upon my being able to procure gas twice using cash during that narrow window.

    A third item when any distance from home is to have a good atlas with you. The GPS you may have in the vehicle or your cell phone may not work and that route you know so very well may not be passable, and then what? A good atlas will allow you to find alternative routes home.

    Lastly, knowing where your family members are going may help you find them if they are not home when “it” happens. Picture yourself at home and your spouse went shopping, and then the SHTF. Did he/she go to the town to the north of where you live or the town to the south? Your spouse went to an event and is staying over in a hotel. Do you know what hotel? With modern electronic communications, details like that might not come up in the conversation because you can contact them anywhere anytime, until you can’t because the SHTF.

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