Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 46 total)
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  • #31694
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “We have had lots of theft on our property because we live way up in the mountains.” Tukie

    It’s a shame that no matter where you go there are dirtballs. Some of the worst people I have ever bumped into were in rural areas. These people will be home invaders after SHTF, they have cased the whole area already and know where they will hit first.

    #31696
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    The rural theft issue speaks to the issue of isolated homesteads. Even if you’ve never met them there are locals who grew up in the area and likely know your property as well as or better than you. It is one of the reasons I bought my BOL in a small hamlet setting where I have neighbors for mutual support.

    #31699
    Profile photo of tukie2
    tukie2
    Survivalist
    member3

    That is my biggest worry, my son and I are alone up here. Last spring we had a white out blizzard…the drive from town normally takes about an hour, it took me almost 5 to get home and I was the only one on the roads…but I couldn’t leave my son alone…we have woodstoves and dogs, but the power goes out all the time, and he is at the age, that he doesn’t always pay attention and would be scared. I got home and he had his bow and arrows loaded and sitting by his side. He stated a man tried to steal the horses….he was letting them out of the pasture..but our horses don’t trust other people and were making it really hard and the dogs went off hearing him. My son locked the doors so he couldn’t come in the back way and then let the dogs out…He took his bow and the guy jumped the back fence and ran off. We don’t get sheriff up here, takes too long to get help, and the blizzard they wouldn’t have made it. My son acted way better than I thought he would, but I told him he should have stayed in the house….if we lose the horses that is a shame, but it would be worse to lose him. That is the biggest worry I have if/when there is a collapse.

    #31700
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    tukie, I don’t know the lay of the land there or the distance to neighbors but something you might consider are walkie talkies or some form of communication mechanism so as to be able to have some mutual support with neighbors. Most likely their issues are similar to yours.

    #31702
    Profile photo of tukie2
    tukie2
    Survivalist
    member3

    Most CB and Walkies are line of sight here, and we are so mountainous, there is not much range. I also have Ham radios for emergent use, but no license as of yet. We don’t have neighbors that believe in prepping.

    #31709
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    The neighbors don’t have to believe in prepping, just in being helpful neighbors should anyone be in need of assistance. Just the story of the guy trying to take the horses should be enough to convince people.

    #31712
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tukie,
    You and your son need radios so if he or you need to skedaddle into the brush for a few hours you can find each other. Using your white out example if he was forced out of the house he would need to communicate with you. In a whiteout if someone is trying to steal my horses I think I would just start shooting and ask questions later. In a SHTF you need a bug out plan that includes leaving in all weather extremes, all. You need a fall back location with shelter in your environment. Maybe build a shed that will be a snow cave in the winter. After it snows make several paths leading to different locations so it would be difficult to determine which path you took to escape. You don’t want someone to just follow your tracks right to the door. Have a way to jump the track so it’s not obvious where you went. Sking over hard ice doesn’t leave tracks for example. Wet the snow with a sprayer creating a think crust where you plan to get off the trail. I’m sure you can think of other methods these just come to mind.

    #31714
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    all of you who live in farm land and can make swale ditching with hardened non porous materials like clay. you can then plug ditch and fill with water. it slows it is terrible to climb into out of and does not give useable cover. you can add duck weed and fish to make it productive for food. it will increase your local bug due to water but fish help fix it. bubbler to keep it ice free in winter

    using bamboo wire and noise makers is a good block/funneling device hard to go through quietly so they move around it and offers no cover only concealment. using 50 gallon plastic drums to plant them in stops them from getting into the soil to grow like a weed/pest. bonus super fast growth and you can harvest bamboo for its many uses.

    use of concealed lighting to blind/stun night actions and illuminate them

    #31715
    Profile photo of tukie2
    tukie2
    Survivalist
    member3

    You guys are awesome. Sorry I hijacked the thread.

    #31723
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>tukie2 wrote:</div>You guys are awesome. Sorry I hijacked the thread.

    At one point or another, we even threadjack our own threads, don’t worry about it.

    Glad it worked out for your son and the thief.

    If you have a gun, I think its time for a little training and practice.
    For both of you.

    Even a little .22 is a force multiplier in a bad situation.

    #31798
    Profile photo of sabasarge
    sabasarge
    Veteran
    member1

    tukie2, after reading your story I would heartily agree with Whirlibird, get that boy of yours some firearms training. It sounds as though he’s already got the spirit, now he needs the tools to go with it.
    Obviously that goes for you as well, if there is a lack there.
    Out there cut off as it sounds that you are presents both positives and negatives. But having firearms with the skills to use them would seem critical to me, and if your boy can shoot with a bow, he can shoot a rifle.
    Just my two Shekels.
    Stay safe friend.

    We do not fight to be free; we fight because we are free
    - Avraham "Ya'ir" Stern -

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    #32507
    Profile photo of Vep
    Vep
    Survivalist
    member4

    Living with relatively close neighbors has it’s advantages. I’ve known of people that had a trailer house on their very scenic, remote property. It was a big single wide full sized trailer house, not an RV, They also had a 40ft steel shipping container to lock all of their stuff into. They went away for a while (a month, if I recall off hand) on a temporary contract because it offered good money. They came back and the trailer and the shipping container were both gone. Those were seriously big items. Whoever took them needed large trucks.

    However, if you live with close by neighbors, people who do that should stockpile a large quantity of extra food, something simple like beans and rice at least. Neighbors who are starving, or even worse, their kids are starving, can become enemies really fast.

    Most people cannot afford a good bug out location, which is essentially a second home. That is why for most people a nomadic set up is best. Nomadic doesn’t mean you are always moving, it means you always have the ability to move if need be.

    Basically it’s a mobile retreat built around an RV or a large, 4 season tent with a wood stove such as one or two military surplus 10 man arctic tents (you can link them together). Basically, you have an RV or a pickup truck, van, or utility trailer with your gear in it, and preferably you have a few good locations pre-scouted out. Once you get there you can live there anywhere from a few days to indefinitely, depending upon the circumstances.

    If extra cash is available and you really want a piece of land that you can say is ‘yours’, a semi-nomadic route will allow you to buy a chunk of land without the expense and risk of a house on the property and all of your stuff being vulnerable. You can also pay it off faster. You can develop a water source (typically the #1 expense of rural living aside from building a house), maybe install a slab to camp on, possibly even do a hidden underground cache. One idea if you owned a piece of land would be to develop a water source and let a local rancher use it for his cattle while you are not there. That would encourage the rancher to keep an eye on it for you.

    In a proper vehicle based nomadic set up, you have with you the gear to live indefinitely, like you would with a house (plant a garden, etc). However, your retreat location can be anywhere, such deep in the national forest if need be. You can adjust your bug out location to meet changing and unexpected conditions. You just need a water source. If you have rural friends or family who already have a retreat or a farm, you will be a lot more welcome if you bring your own dwelling and gear with you.

    If you have to bug out again you can. You don’t necessarily have to travel great distances in a secondary bug out. Even a mere 10 or 20 mile relocation can often make a huge difference in your survival. You don’t need an endless supply of fuel for your vehicle since you are not constantly moving. You need enough to get there, do the occasional errand maybe, and if need be, do one, or several, short relocations (hordes of starving refugees, forest fire, etc).

    However, a house in the woods or a nomadic setup, you might want to consider having several signs with you similar to this to be placed along access routes to your area during times of crisis:

    #33791
    Profile photo of ArcticSurvivor
    ArcticSurvivor
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Here’s an idea. It probably wont stop someone right off the bat, but it should alert you or whoever is on lookout.

    Hope it helps,
    -ArcticSurvivor

    #33797
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Artic survivor … I like it, but it could be made a bit …. more interesting.
    Say instead of using a glow stick you used smelling salts instead.
    Or a combination of glow sticks primers and smelling salts in your distribution of traps.
    A strong odor is hard to hide. Most people won’t even know they were just discovered. They’ll go ape over the smell and think they just walked into a bat cave. Or they will think they were just poison gassed. lol

    Basically a stink bomb booby trap. Check out Fred and George’s Party Supplies for more info. Oh yes… plenty on Amazon. Lucky you if you can find Mercaptan or make it.

    #33842
    Profile photo of ArcticSurvivor
    ArcticSurvivor
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Good Idea!

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