Viewing 12 posts - 31 through 42 (of 42 total)
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  • #33810
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Mtb,
    I thought about the new dry top getting wet, but if there is a wind I want to ptotect myself as best as I could. I have used this method when I’ve needed to change in cold weather and it works for me.

    Coming back to the problems a second time I would make sure the wind breaker is waterproof. Then instead of putting a wet coat in the garbage bag, I would put it back on over the wind breaker. Most modern coats will continue to provide insulation even when wet.

    Zipper Eaze is a soft bees wax in tube stick. Applied to any zipper it eliminates resistance so they work easily and they don’t jam.

    #33817
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    74 .. I think the thermal reserve area of the human body is actually the butt. If you protect that area and your head and use a wool sweater/shirt under the wet coat that would be the best. A mylar bag would be better than a plastic bag. When I researched Blizzard survival bag I found they also make a mylar emergency parka. I’d just soon use tape on heat paks. Or have a hot tub waiting.

    #33822
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Brulen,
    I’m sure there are many different products available, my rig is just using the things I either have now or have used in the past. Mmmm, I think I stick with my set up for now. I think you skipped a few posts though.

    Your turn in the water :)

    #33963
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Brulen, you say “I think the thermal reserve area of the human body is actually the butt.” I don’t actually understand what you mean by that, could you expand a little? Many thanks!

    #36848
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Toby, you never got back to me on this.

    #36876
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    I’m not sure what I’m meant to be getting back to you on…?

    #46631
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Its that time of year and though this wouldn’t help if you fell through ice into deep water, hip boots would help keep you dry if traversing terrain where you have the occasional wet areas to contend with. I just bought these today in the store for $5 less than shown here.

    http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/product/index.jsp?productId=32986566&camp=CSE:GooglePLA:32986566:18049909:TACKLE&CAGPSPN=pla&CAWELAID=120138600000150508&catargetid=120138600001586793&cadevice=c

    Long story short the in-feed to my pond was plugged. It was 23 degrees out and windy. Using a heavy maul I smash ice away to get access to where I needed and see I have to get into the water to fix the problem. No problem I think being I have my 18″ high boots on and the water is not deep. Turned out the water was a little deeper than that and my boots filled in an instant with 32 degree water. To make matters worse I couldn’t clear what I needed to without plunging my arm in too. Having done that dance before I decided to go buy some hip boots today. Fortunately it was only a few hundred feet back to the house. The numbing effects and pain from water that cold comes quickly. Being out in the cold is not a big deal as you can dress for it, but you cannot get wet like I did. It changes everything very fast. I did have on wool socks like we discussed last year though…..

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Profile photo of MountainBiker MountainBiker.
    #46634
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Ever notice that things hurt worse when its cold also ? even something small like stub your toe , hurts worse in winter lol .

    #46635
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    Well now that’s a great story to act as a reminder not to fall into cold water. Keep in mind that if you fall with waders on it can be difficult to stand up after they fill with water. Moving water makes the problem a severe one.

    #46637
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Good to remember that even just somewhat colder water can be very, very dangerous. There were a four Soldiers in the Ranger School a number of years back that died down in Florida during the water/swamp phase of training at Eglin AFB. The water was just above 50° and the air temperature was above 60°, though they were in the water on the exercise for a considerable period of time, and transport to the hospital was delayed. Hypothermia can set in very, very quickly (seconds) in extremely cold water, cut can be insidious and “sneaky” in so-called warmer water as well. A person can become incapacitated before they’d ever expect to.

    Great reminder – thanks MB. Sorry it had to be at your expense, but glad you got through it OK.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #46640
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Yes, time exposed to cold water and how quickly you dry off and get into relative warmth makes all the difference. Those soldiers were just in the water too long. 50 degrees is still too cold for prolonged exposure. My guess is that whoever was in charge figured the air temp made things OK.

    The colder the water and the colder it is when you get out the less time you have. When the water is 32 degrees and the air temps even colder, the timeframe is pretty short, especially of the wind is blowing. I think also your general physical condition & health matter too. Having had hypothermia once I can attest that your thinking becomes muddled causing the choices you make to potentially make matters worse. Best to stay dry in winter if you can.

    #46644
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    I remember the hero years ago that helped people out of the crashed airliner in the river in D.C. He helped a few people, then just slipped quietly under water and was gone. Very quick, very tragic.

    MB, that Ranger School tragedy was a (non)comedy of errors. They were supposed to be knee to waist deep in water in an area well known to School staff. But a high tide pushed water levels up in the swamp, and the trainees were up to their necks much of the time. Plus, what should have taken far less time ended up not working out well (probably partly due to the almost total submersion, and thus lack of maneuverability of the Soldiers). They were in the water an incredible six hours, trying to accomplish a task that should have taken far less normally. I never heard the details of the fallout, but I’m sure some heads rolled on that one – they clearly should have. I well remember in survival (now known as SERE) school we frequently said we could not believe the President of the United States knew what they were doing to high-value assets (everyone was an air crew member of some variety, mostly pilots and navigators, but a few enlisted crew members of larger aircraft). The training has to be as close to the limits as possible, because it has to prepare trainees for the extremes of the real situation – and teach that personal limits are well above what we think they are. Our class had a young airman get lost in the mountains in northeastern Washington in sub-freezing temps, and he was only found later that night – coughing up blood, and in very bad shape. Despite some bad weather, night time, very difficult terrain, etc., they were able to evacuate him. We were told he survived, but never saw him again of course.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

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