Viewing 6 posts - 16 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #9360
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    </Can you share some more details how everyone worked together? How was this managed / coordinated? >

    I was not assigned to the patrols, but as I understand it we basically coordinated our patrols with the civilians and got everyone familiar with one another so we knew who was all on the same side and set up communications so we could all coordinate our efforts. I was told there was a few tense moments when our guys encountered citizen patrols in the beginning.

    I am not sure a regular army unit could have accomplished this. The National Guard is a militia made up of volunteers, and while we used US Army issued gear we tended to be more flexible in how we deal with situations. A career soldier typically only knows soldiering and military SOP, protocols and regimentation as a way to accomplish goals. National Guard members have day jobs and bring to the table experience that very few career soldiers will ever acquire and because of this can adapt more readily to unfamiliar situations that require thinking outside the box.

    #9361
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Pheonix, I just want to thank you for your service.

    #10822
    Profile photo of MakingDo
    MakingDo
    Prepper
    rprepper

    “I just imagine there must be a lot of awareness to these issues in Florida.”

    Jay, unfortunately many people have short memories.  Enough time passes between hurricanes, especially the bad ones, that people forget the impact these storms can have.  I’m sure that anyone who lived through Andrew, Charlie, Hugo, Katrina etc. will never forget, but for the more mild storms people tend to get complacent.  Some even get downright cocky.  They ride out a Cat 1 or 2 with not much more than a day off of work, and then want to have a Hurricane Party the next time one comes around.  That kind of attitude can be very dangerous.  Storms can change intensity and direction without much notice.

    We knew Andrew was going to be serious, problem was that it was supposed to hit further up the coast.  While we were hunkered down in West Palm Beach expecting something severe, the folks in Miami were getting hammered by the worst part of the storm when they were only expecting the outskirts.  A perfect example of “prepare for the worst, hope for the best”.

    My Ex used to make fun of me for gathering a few extra supplies before hurricane season … that all stopped when he got back from Miami to get his grandmother out of Cutler Ridge after Andrew.

    #10835
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I believe the media sensationalism has a lot to do with peoples attitudes about hurricanes. “OMG run for your lives you’re gonna die if you stay” and then the area gets just 50 mph winds. Take ol’ katy kuric during Katrina. I’m not saying Katrina wasn’t devastating but when she sits in a canoe to do coverage and a guy walks by in the background in ankle deep water it just causes people to doubt reports and that is what gets people killed.

    #10850
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Makingdo Cutler Ridge and Homestead was devastated. What I saw there you can not write in words.

    #11118
    Profile photo of MakingDo
    MakingDo
    Prepper
    rprepper

    Freedom, I believe it!  My Ex came back a changed man. He was speechless for a couple days before telling me what he had seen.

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