Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 63 total)
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  • #39198
    Profile photo of Aukxsona
    Aukxsona
    Survivalist
    member2

    As a Pagan, my faith and many others under the Pagan umbrella has been around for thousands of years. When I look to the forefathers of my religion and the extreme primitive conditions they lived and thrived in, I feel less fear. I know that although I personally may not survive the total “end of civilization” as we know it, my children can.

    When I look to the healers and wise women, now called midwives, I can hear a calling back to those skills. I teach my children the ancient ways of healing, for when there are no more anti-biotics or surgeries. I don’t feel afraid, I feel like I have so much to do.

    When I look back just one or two generations, to my grandmothers time and how they lived on a farm capable of surviving without oil, I look in awe at their abilities. I also realize they too were just humans that made do with very little and that I can too.

    Everyone of us is a genetic winner from our ancestors. Going forward everyone of us has a chance to pass on our genetics to the next generation, along with their skills they will need. When your beliefs and practices go back to the stone age, the idea of the end of the world is silly. Yes, the world will change drastically, but so too can you.

    When was the last time you went without electricity, running water, food, and had babies screaming for food...now you know why I prep. These are the things a mother's nightmares are made of.

    #39200
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Jews feel the same way , by their beliefs ( and to a lesser extent Christians ) they also were here during the stone age . Sort of like Mormons , but even more so , just being in the “club” gives you access to people who know how to do things . They do look after their own most of the time .

    #39204
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good to hear from you Aukxsona. I had wondered where you were.

    One of my big regrets is that I didn’t ask my grandmother more questions when she was alive. I had just turned 19 when she passed and like most teenagers I was preoccupied with teenage things. She came from a farm in the middle of the Gaspe Pensinsula part of Quebec, This is where the St. Lawrence River enters the ocean. It is a remote and sparsely populated place even today, and with a harsh climate, yet they survived without utilities, hospitals, or any modern amenities. When I was a kid we only went to the doctor or the hospital for vaccinations, stitches, and surgeries. My grandmother took care of everything else, and I’ll bet she’d of done our stitches too if my mother would have let her. For the Baby Boomers here, so much knowledge has been lost in our very lifetimes.

    #39205
    Profile photo of Aukxsona
    Aukxsona
    Survivalist
    member2

    Hello Mountain Biker! I have been busy on my little farmlet raising more goats, pigs, and other things. I have been focusing on honing my homesteader skills. I literally am becoming a lot more low tech. How are you? Here’s a little picture of my kitties that keep my toes warm on nights while I work on writing, crocheting, or sewing.

    When was the last time you went without electricity, running water, food, and had babies screaming for food...now you know why I prep. These are the things a mother's nightmares are made of.

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    #39208
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MtB,
    You didn’t know that the knowledge was slipping away, nor did you think you would ever have the need to use an old knowledge base. Hopefully you won’t have to use it.

    #39209
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “The idea of the end of the world is silly. Yes, the world will change drastically, but so too can you.” Aukxsona

    A rapid change to premodern technology will be very messy. We don’t have enough horses or plows for food production.

    #39210
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Aukxsona, I love the kitties. The one on the left reminds me of one I had when I was a teenager. I am otherwise waiting for things to warm up enough to start some seeds in the greenhouse we built last year. I’m starting to monitor the high/low temps. Yesterday was a sunny but cold day but it got up to 94 degrees inside, then dropped to a low of 5 degrees inside it last night, so we’re nowhere near being able to start seeds.

    74, the scary part is that the knowledge my grandmother had is what her ancestors knew for hundreds of years living in that remote setting, and its mostly all been lost in two generations. There are things people in that region used to do that don’t even occur to anyone anymore. My great grandfather’s house (not the house my grandmother grew up in) is a museum house now and so I have visited it a couple times. The well is inside the kitchen. Seems to be a very sensible way of doing things in a cold climate yet it isn’t done anymore. The stone fireplace is in the center of the house with openings in both the great room and kitchen. The stone is fully exposed downstairs and upstairs to maximize the radiant heat effect. It was a little house and all the kids (14 in his family) slept upstairs in what was the equivalent of an unfinished attic (think colonial era Cape Cod style) with only that radiant heat off of the stones for warmth, and what would radiate up through the floor. There wasn’t a stairwell to the upstairs, just a ladder. That farm fronted the St. Lawrence River which at that point is something like 30 miles wide giving it the equivalent of being on the open ocean as concerns the cold wind blowing off of the river Accordingly, the house had the equivalent of a root cellar room off of the kitchen on the north side of the house where the wind hit it. The house was built by his family in the 1700’s in a way to make a liveable place in that climate. Such considerations don’t even occur to people anymore.

    #39213
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MtB,
    Although we don’t see these things in use today, my personal belief is that the ingenuity to devise and create is an innate ability that will continue in the future. No matter what obstacles are presented people will come to solutions.

    #39217
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I agree 74, but it will be an unnecessarily painful process re-inventing the wheel due to the knowledge we have lost in the past 50 years.

    #39222
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    “The idea of the end of the world is silly. Yes, the world will change drastically, but so too can you.” Aukxsona

    A rapid change to premodern technology will be very messy. We don’t have enough horses or plows for food production.

    Having spent the first 4 decades in farm country, let me put forth an opinion on this, even with enough horses and plows, production will not be enough without modern fertilizers, insecticides and herbicides.

    First, there’s a reason why farms were small, because there’s only so much ground one can work within the growing season.

    Secondly, even with enough horses and plows, the lack of hands, farriers, veterenarians leather workers and more doom it from the beginning.

    How many corn cribs, silos and other storage facilities do you see on farms anymore? You don’t all too often because its cheaper to take it directly to the storage/buyer by truck and be done with it.

    Corn, wheat, sugar beets, millet, all are harvested right into the backs of semis and grain haulers and trucked to the co-ops.

    The small farm is essentially dead, even the small family farms are dependent upon fuel for their crop.

    The few exceptions? The Amish and Mennonite communities, but they can’t grow enough extra to consider. And even some of them use fuel oil powered tractors with steel wheels for the farm.

    One has to look at farming and population growth.
    As farming improved, the population grew.
    You cannot even begin to come close to supporting our population with low tech needs.

    Heck look at zimbabwe, used to be the breadbasket of Africa, feeding millions elsewhere. Now with the theft of the industrialized farms, being handed over to the people who revolted, who still try to farm by hand in some cases, they are now importing most of their food, they are starving, it is not a viable answer.

    Like it or not, Gulf, Chevron, Sinclair, and yes Monsanto and others are a priority to keep running.

    #39224
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    http://www.trueactivist.com/gab_gallery/holy-sh-t-without-saying-a-word-this-6-minute-short-film-will-make-you-speechless/

    the source of most meat…. i am a meat eater… mine just live the idea they portray open pasture free to forage and be animals while being cared for…this is sad in so may ways.

    worse i coming banks are buying all the water rights…. you can see how this will end

    #39226
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly,
    I’m not even considering the current population, only the surviving numbers. However everything you point out is true. I’d still go for a steam engine and/or a team of draft animals instead of a shovel and a hoe.

    #39228
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    namelus yes the film does leave me speechless, though I suppose I am not surprised. It is the only way that so few can feed so many for such a small share of the average person’s income in the industrialized world.

    Without the entire modern infrastructure functioning the world could not feed anything approaching the current population.

    #39231
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Factory food processors, they omitted slaughtering the animals thankfully. That’s always an eye opener. Hunting and butchering your own animals helps to keep where your food comes from in perspective.

    #39233
    Profile photo of Aukxsona
    Aukxsona
    Survivalist
    member2

    “A rapid change to premodern technology will be very messy. We don’t have enough horses or plows for food production. ” ~ 74

    “The few exceptions? The Amish and Mennonite communities, but they can’t grow enough extra to consider. And even some of them use fuel oil powered tractors with steel wheels for the farm. – ” Whirlibird

    Yes, it will be messy, but I wholeheartedly believe that those of us already in the country, with food in the ground will make it out alive. Here’s why besides the history of people’s, in 2007 I went without a car for over a year. For the first 6 months I lived off of my garden and some chickens we had that could scratch for their keep. Now I had no idea then how to put food by, and truthfully how to garden properly so we survived…barely. I have since learned so much about gardening with natural fertilizer, have gained so much capital to garden with natural means, and know how to save every scrap now.

    If I on less than a large farm could feed myself, a husband, and 5 small children on a garden for 6 months when I was a beginner, surely more will do better than I did. No we didn’t have every food we needed to have a very healthy diet. Yes, we ran out of sugar, oil, oatmeal, flour, and other essentials. We didn’t have milk except breast milk for the baby. We didn’t have meat other than eggs and the occasional hen, rabbit, or fish.

    Now I readily admit that when winter came, we were up shits creek without a paddle for several reasons. I hadn’t planted enough to can. I didn’t even know how to can. I had no root cellar. I didn’t know how to cook some of the vegetables I grew, although I did learn that winter quickly. I had no way to dry foods in order to keep them. I didn’t know I should save seeds, how to, or even if I could. I had no idea how to grow herbs or use them. I had no freezer with which to keep my harvest. Most of this has changed. I now can, cook, dry foods, root cellar, grow and use herbs, and know that the essentials most people think are essential are not.

    The only essentials that are hard to get are salt, sugar, and vinegar, one of which can be made right at home like you make wine and another can be gotten from beets.

    This year we hope to grow wheat, oats, flax, vegetables, pears, peaches, and plums. I also hope to get my asparagus started and rhubarb. I have perennial onions, garlic, and more already in the ground. Today I plant more onions and potatoes so that we have an early start to a great food year. We have goats and one is pregnant so we will probably get milk. We have fruit trees that need cleared and sprayed with regular olive oil today, to keep the bugs away. If I could find a way to grow olives, I would be in heaven. We have a pig for bacon to get us through the winter alive and to make soap with if need be. Yes, I have expanded my skills set completely. We could get by for longer than 2 weeks now. I don’t know how long, but I believe at least 2 months food wise if I scratched and pecked and longer if the harvests started to come in nice and fat.

    I learned to sew and crochet. This year I want to learn to make linen. I am starting with sowing the flax. Then at year’s end save the seeds, since there are no seed sources in the US available for the home gardener. Then I will rett the flax, and clean it of towing, then spin and weave. All of these will be new skills I have to learn. All of these will require equipment, a spinning wheel and a loom. I can make the loom, but a spinning wheel is a devil of a thing to try and make. All and all my linen project will probably take 2 or 3 years to finish and then I will have sufficient experience to make cloth from plant fibers.

    We are building animal pens and pastures this year and I hope to have enough to get sheep. I hope to harvest their wool to spin, dye, and crochet. Of course if I never get sheep this year, I hope to in the next year or two. The point is, I am ever moving towards being self sufficient. Four sheep only provide one sweater and socks per year. Not enough for our whole family for sure. However, enough to add to our needs and in times of desperation, we could make it into socks alone, or a blanket alone.

    Anyway, I am rambling…I do believe people can make it. MB you are right about the housing. My husband and I are having to practically rebuild our house to make it livable here in the south. So many things we have already done to reduce the heat in the summer.

    One glaring thing I haven’t addressed is security. I am a firm believer you can not shoot your way out of every situation. You have to be unavailable. We live two miles back on a dirt road. Before anyone reaches us, there are numerous bigger, wealthier looking homesteads. We are surrounded by smaller homesteads in our immediate vicinity, with many people that hunt and are like minded. We have a BBQ in the summer and talk about our plans. Imagine a ring of very sparse enormous homes with large cattle and plenty of food, inside this is a much smaller circle of small land holdings, smaller homes, with may be 4 goats a piece and some chickens or a pig and a small garden. The larger homes have everything a thief will look for and at the heart is a community of small land holders that have fire power. Finding the center will be difficult unless in SHTF there are still Google maps since everything is off the pavement. Being located like this keeps us safer from those that would seek to harm us from the outside.

    I don’t understand why everyone is so fearful when the solution is to become more self sufficient and to avoid conflict by avoiding population centers if at all possible.

    I know that Selco said the country dwellers suffered much. I know also in Argentina the same occurred. That happened in very remote areas away form any other house at all or in the suburbs just outside of cities. I am neither very remote nor in the suburbs. It is more like a suburb community without businesses where everyone has ten acres surrounded by large stately farms. It is a very unique area.

    When was the last time you went without electricity, running water, food, and had babies screaming for food...now you know why I prep. These are the things a mother's nightmares are made of.

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