Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #49696
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7
    #49700
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Wow.

    #49701
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    There is one among us that will no doubt defend , or downplay the unacceptable on every level actions of this group of scum .

    #49702
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I sure everyone realizes the government will spend any amount of money to prosecute someone for breaking the most trivial law. I have no doubts that every sentence written here is analyzed hoping someone is violating a law.

    #49704
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    I have little surprise that they would do this nor does it surprise me that they got “romantically” involved with the people that they were spying on. What does surprise me is that they actually paid off the ladies that were, literally, “f*cked” over by the spies. Normally, this would be just covered up.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #49708
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    THis is the problem , sh*t gets swept under the carpet , or covered up . Good cops ? I’m sure there are some out there , but they let the bad cops get away with it . So how good are they ? They wonder why the American public now looks at them as the enemy ……………its because of things like this , and other abuses that get covered up , or if made public ENOUGH , get a slap on the wrist . My logic tells me that contrary to pro LEO arguments , the fact remains that sentences of convicted cops are lighter than for you or me ……….when was the last time a convicted bad cop got the death penalty ? When a nobody committing the same crime would . IF the departments were as honorable as some pro LEO people claim , then why are they NOT just as outraged for the stain of bad cops as the rest of the people are , and demand full punishment of the law for the crimes ? Because they are corrupt .

    #49709
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Pretty unusual to out an mi5 guy. I would feel sorry for him as well as her. Leading a life of deceit is no kind of life. I wonder if his boss caught Mr. Stone making up stuff, or maybe the problem was there was so much good intel they couldn’t believe it. Now she and her friends are totally exposed. He did to good a job. They have files on everyone from the lowest to the highest in the network. Hundreds perhaps thousands of people.

    #49710
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Under cover ops are absolutely essential, given the fact that there is evil in this world. While I’m glad we have a CIA in the U.S., and the equivalent in the relatively friendly countries, I still cringe at the thoughts of what they have to do. I was completely opposed to Daddy Bush as President for exactly that reason – we NEED a CIA chief, but I just don’t want that same guy to be my President. It’s much the same with combat deployments. Soldiers and Marines, particularly, have to do things in that environment that are so utterly abhorrent to “civilized” society back home, that they’re stuck being unable to talk about it, process it, or ultimately deal with it. They were raised with a set of values that HAVE to go out the window in certain circumstances. As one Soldier put it to me one day, “It’s like when you go over there, you have to turn off all the feeling switches. And when you come back home, you try to turn them back on to resume “normal” life, but it just doesn’t work,” meaning the feeling switches have to remain off just to halfway cope. So we end up with 22 vet suicides per day. I wonder how many cop (and former cop) suicides also exist for the same reasons.

    It’s not just a simple “this is good and decent,” vs. “this is a wrong and bad” decision. I’ve heard things that could very easily make headline news if the media got hold of it, and result in severe sentences if not even potentially the death penalty. And I’m NOT talking about the utterly gross actions such as My Lai. I’m talking about the immediate, situational experiences where training simply doesn’t cover the options, or the cases where training DID cover the options – except those options in that individual situation simply are the wrong answers. And the Soldier or Marine has to make a split second decision and live with it – and can never talk about it except with the other battle buddies that were right there with him.

    Covert ops is really quite similar in many respects – whether through local or federal agencies. It’s a nasty business, yet things would be even nastier without those kinds of folks. It’s easy to sit back in one’s desk chair, in the comfort of one’s quiet home, second guessing decisions that simply cannot be understood EXCEPT by one who’s actually been there, done that. Even the “mistakes” and bad calls are rarely as simple black/white issues as they might seem to the armchair critics and trolls. My heart literally aches, over and over, even several years now past retirement. I heard too many “stories” that I certainly would never document for the protection of my own clients, and have a perspective that few except those that really have “been there done that” can even comprehend. And I’m quite stuck as well, being unable to “unload” those stories which build up over time, particularly as I watched the devastating effects on individuals and families. To do so would have put generally good people (Soldiers) at risk of being judged by the system as well as the media (not to mention all the armchair critics and trolls), and suffering potential legal and further emotional consequences as a result.

    This applies to military as well as civil agency ops. There ARE no good answers in far too many of the cases, due to the paradox of trying to judge actions that in general society are immoral, when the very need to carry them out is essential to societal safety in many cases. The minority of bad actors and egregious errors is much smaller than the sit-at-home trolls would have us believe. And what appear to be cover-ups aren’t always what THEY appear to be.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #49713
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    THe problem with modern veterans is that the know they were hung out to dry ………..and they cant come up with anything to show for it . My father was a WW2 vet , what ever problems that generation came back with , they could at least say ” we won the war “. Modern vets will never know victory , because they fought for a government that doesnt want to WIN , and I am absolutely convinced ……….doesnt KNOW HOW TO WIN . Pretty much like Russia in WW1 ………corrupt and incompetent . Back to the cops , make all the excuses you want for them , but you and they both know , that if their parents and other loved ones were aware of what they have done , they would hang their head in SHAME . Greyson is correct when he said it starts at the TOP , drugs , etc etc etc , is a problem easily solved as a government , secure the borders , etc , things easily done …………..they just refuse to do it .

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.