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  • #47354
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Matt – you are right – in the horse world there are always a thousand different opinions about everything!

    For myself, I always wear spurs and carry a crop. I have never had too much problems with a horse that bucks. Pull up their head and push ‘em forward with my spurs. You can feel when they are about to try it most of the time. Then, back in the barn I always check for problems with the fit of the tack. Also check out their condition a lot more thoroughly, including their teeth. Horses act up a lot when they are in pain or uncomfortable. Of course, I have also had a few that were just lazy, or had spent to much time in the barn and a bit sour, and try to get rid of you so they can keep doing their thing. Ha. That’s when I give them a basic refresher course, working them in a pen or small paddock on the line to remind them of what is what and who is who. It’s the ones that want to rear that really tick me off!

    #47355
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    If you’ve never ridden a horse, or do but aren’t in to jumpers like me, watch this – be sure to have the sound on. Such a rush.

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    #47361
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    I was about to ask if you could include a video to go along with the image attachment, but then realized I’d missed the link in the text. Nice! The only time I rode a horse was for a summer in Montana when I was 12 years old and had the chance to go to a camp for a month out there. If we’d had a place to keep it (and the money to keep it up), I’d have taken “my” horse back home in a heartbeat. Loved that month, but never had another chance the rest of my life. I’ve come to appreciate the close relationship that can be formed between a human and an animal in the years since, and can only imagine what it must be like in this kind of sport. Must be special.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #47371
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    No problem tweva. I don’t have any experience with horses but I do appreciate having some folks in the neighborhood who do.

    #47372
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Actually It’s hard to come up with something that will be more important to survival then horses. Prior to steam and internal combustion they provided all of the labor for overland transportation, farming and logging. Farming without them is conducted at subsistence levels. Moving logs large enough for lumber and building timbers without horses, is a exercise I don’t want to consider.

    #47375
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Oxen were commonly used in rural New England in colonial days for plowing, pulling logs, moving big stones and so forth. Not sure if they were used elsewhere. They’re not smart like horses and they don’t move fast but they are exceptionally strong. Where I used to live still has a lot of farm parcels from the 1600’s. They look very strange on a map given they are very long and very narrow,the reason being it was hard to turn oxen around when plowing so parcels were laid out in a way that maximized use of oxen. Modern day farmers of course own multiple such parcels so as to get configurations that make sense for modern equipment. Oxen were even used to move houses and other structures to new sites.

    #47376
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    A wealthy woman I used to ride for had a pair of oxen. I think the colonists just didn’t have many horses, access to them – and certainly not a variety of breeds. An ox is a big, ungainly creature, generally slow moving – but they can run for short burts but they look so silly. Basically, once castrated I think something is just triggered with their hormones and they …well just wanna eat. And, they get bigger and fatter. End up pretty useless. All things considered don’t you wonder how the Colonists ever survived. No wonder they died young.

    I ended up with the mule, who is a huge 18 plus hands (my biggest horse in the photos is 16.2 hands from a friend who filed for divorce and made big life changes. Looks like a big draft horse (mother was a Shire) with big ears. She could outwork an ox I’ve no doubt and is much calmer/unflappable – yet quick and oh so agile – then a horse. And, I can ride her.

    One of the reasons I also am training them all to come to me, and come full on quick – is because I know they will be valuable and become a target for thieves. Modern day ‘rustlers’. It already happens occasionally around here – more frequently with the cattle because they are easier to hide and sell. Many horses of any value are micro-chipped now – not the cattle. But a well-trained horse is going to become a highly desired animal in the future I suspect. Heck, even as it is now, to find a versatile, well trained horse costs no small amount of money. Probably have about 38k or more in horse flesh decorating the pastures at the moment. Thankfully I bred/trained 3 of them. Been wondering and talking to friends when I think about it if I could try training them to avoid a human when not under saddle (ecept me or someone able to provide them some positive ‘ok’ signal/sound) ‘Course, if the human knew how to throw a lasso with any accuracy the point would be moot.

    Would love to own a Clydesdale or Percheron someday. Love the big, chunky guys! Anyway, late. Just…think about going on a trail ride, getting on a horse or getting to know any horse people if you can.

    #47380
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tweva,
    I didn’t have the opportunity to look at the jumping video until just now. It made me think of your earlier comment about trust. A requirement for relationships of every kind, animals or human. However in this case the human trust in the animal to perform is very high. Something that hours together can only provide.

    It made me remember the horses we had on our little farm. Only one of which had the personality would I trust to jump ( preferably not with me on him). The other horses, although they were fine saddle horses, I would not have thought to train them to jump. Maybe incorrectly but the trust would not be there. I don’t know if somebody that hasn’t been on a horse at a full gallop would conjure the adrenaline it produces.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #47386
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Would love to own a Clydesdale … someday.

    Just in case you haven’t seen it, thought you might enjoy a bit of a smile. ;-)

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

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