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  • #47305
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    If you have horses and more than a few acres you can understand my latest project of the last 6 months. Training my horses to come quickly to me…full on…for 2 reasons: 1) may need to do it someday for survival/safety and 2) it’s become a PIA to wait on them to come at their own pace when I call. And, want to be able to load ‘em fast.

    You can watch the video of a guy who has done this (GREAT!) here. You can see, I am sure, why this is something I think would be well worth time spent.

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    #47311
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    Amazing!

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #47312
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    I’ll take most animals over most humans any day. The mutual respect and loyalty returned from them is hard to find in the human world. Thanks for sharing that video – amazing, yet not. Shows what respect and loyalty can accomplish.

    #47313
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    That is pretty cool. My mom raised/trained horses most of her life. She has had to let them go now due to age and just being too beat up to do it anymore. When she was training a new colt to load in a trailer she would just pull the trailer out in the pasture and leave it open. At feed time she would place their food in the trailer and just walk away. After about a week she would close the trailer up and only open it at feed time. It didn’t take long and they just associated the trailer with getting fed and would walk right in when you opened the doors, lol of course the only downside was if we were cleaning the trailer out after a trip and we opened the doors we would sometimes have visitors walk in while cleaning.

    #47316
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    For a SHTF , a mule might serve well . Way back in the day , the mountain man , and prospector preferred the mule out in the bush . Reasons were very practical , mules will forage , and they are very sure footed in rough terrain , and dont tend to be as spooky . But then again , every animal has its own personality .

    #47317
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Hi Tweva,,
    Nice to see your post.

    Matt, looks like this guy has used your mothers training techniques.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #47319
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    It is all about trust

    #47320
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good to have you back tweva. Should have known you were acquiring a new useful skill. The horse video was amazing. Never saw anything like it.

    As long as we’re on horses, I have a question. I’ve never had horses and don’t plan on it but I am curious how useful modern day horses are come a SHTF scenario. Lots of folks around here have horses. The rich have their horse farms and you see plenty of poor folks living in old mobile homes in the countryside that will have one or two horses too. They are all for pleasure. It is a rarity to see a working horse. Are the hobby horses good for anything come SHTF? Are they trainable to pull a plow for example?

    #47324
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Dearest Mountain Biker…if no cars…how r u to get about? Mules, slow, heavy duty animals. Great, but u want to get from here to there? Gonna go on foot? All of you shud learn the basics of horsemanship. Today, a head-on collision between suv and plow truck. Guess who (unfortunately) had the ‘hobby horses’? show up to help erect barriers, close road until rescue cud show up? They r/will be yr MODE of TRANSPORTATION place there first. (Not been good/happy day for me). B4 cars? How did peeps get around. F’ing horses. Learn to ride basics. Might save yr butt some day. MBiker, horses do not discriminate. They have huge hearts n will do their best to do anything u ask of them. Hobby horse. Horses do not classify themselves this way. They do what they r trained to do n follow a human, loving owners instructions to the end How do u propose getting around, other then slugging on yr feet, without a horse..hmm? What was the mode of transportation b4 the auto? Get real peeps. Learn a new skill…at least how to catch n get on a horse.Even so, u may run across some loose come SHTF..do u know what to do? Mules? Depends. That is another post. Current mule have is almost 18 hands n have fox hunted her.

    #47325
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    When using a horse for labor it’s no different then any other machine. The work load needs to match the capabilities of the power source. If you need more power use more horses. If you overload the power source it will overheat and wear out quickly.

    #47326
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    tweva, I’ve only ever been on a horse once, and that was a rented one at a resort, hence my questions. My transport plan is riding a bike or walking, though I do appreciate the fact that a horse might be a much less labor intensive transport mechanism. I say might given they need to be fed and cared for 12 months a year and the grass only grows here at most 7 months a year. I do have a fenced in sheep pasture and a hay field, the hay from which currently feeds goats. Two different farmers using the land at present.

    #47333
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Tweva,

    Have you ever checked out “Round Pen Reasoning?” It is an older book, but it helped to keep me from getting as buggered up as I did before trying that method. When I first started breaking horses I used to cross Scotch hobble them and just ride them until they gave up. They can’t buck that way. It was efficient, but there wasn’t that trust factor that makes it easy to catch them (without dumping them with a rope a few times as they run off) and they tend to need more encouragement until you get some serious days in the hills.

    Also, have you learned how to trim and shoe? I took a class back when I was a kid (high school) where I became a certified farrier. It was expensive and doing it as a job really was horrific, but I will strongly state that all people that own horses should know the basics. Even if you can’t correct gaits or do specialty shoeing, it is worth the time to at least know how to replace a shoe in the hills if it falls off.

    Great points and great post, Tweva. This is something that most people don’t think about.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #47336
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Mountain Biker- I am sure you have spares for your bike. And, I am happy you are in an area with horse people. AND, I am sorry if I was a bit strenuous – yesterday was a horrific day,not that that is an excuse. Please forgive me. Yes, horses do take care and you are always learning something with them. But then I love them, so it’s hard for me to put myself in place of someone who doesn’t/or hasn’t been around them lots.

    Where I live is far too hilly/mountains and too many roads are gravel for me to even think about a bike. The paved roads would all take me to places I would not want to go during bad times. As I age, a horse is going to be a great help. A harness, they pull logs out of woods. Attach a sledge, they can draw loads of material about. I can work them from the ground easily. Or, I can attach a cart or surry and ride along with them. If things go bad, and I live long enough to see things settle, will come in handy for me or whomever is left to be able to resupply from somewhere.

    They come in very handy for me even now. Our community group does all our perimeter trail work on horseback. This summer, my mule pulled the remains of a dock gone a muck out of a large pond onto land for a friend. A tractor could not have gotten there. Then there was yesterday. Ice storm. On top of 6″ of snow. 15F. Vehicle that had no need to be on the road, lost control, hit disabled snowplow head on. County sheriff neighbor called our group (he part of). They couldn’t get vehicles there but knew other poorly informed people would no doubt me out trying to drive and make matters worse. If you have a good horse, with the right shoes, you can help and we did.
    Blocked both ends of roads to stop more dumb drivers well before the wreck – and we could get out of their way as they slid about to a stop. Worse, we pulled what was left of the vehicle off the dump truck plow so when helicopter rescue came they could get to driver. Unfortunately, he was dead. It was awful. But thank goodness for the horses. they helped when few other ways of transport could.

    Anyway, I hope you can get to know your horse loving neighbors….they will certainly come in handy! ;)

    #47337
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Sledjockey – No, I’ve never read the book. It’s been a while since I had to break and train a green horse but I always use a pen or small paddock and a lunge line. Add weight with sand bags gradually. Concurrently always lead them on foot out into woods on trails – trained them to jump obstacles same way. They all grew up to the sound of various gunfire sounds. Introducing them to a bit is always the fun part. It is a slower process perhaps but certainly helps build the bond and trust with the horse – especially later when you are asking them to do something they think is highly suspicious! Like go anywhere near pigs. I have no idea why, but almost every horse I have ever ridden smells pigs, just smells them and freaks out to varying degrees.

    Yes, I can trim and re-shoe. Did that last week after fishing some shoes out of the mud pit of a paddock after the huge storm we had started to melt. Unh. A farrier I am not. Back-breaking work and have no patience for working with metal. Thankfully, only 1 of the 4 needs any real corrective shoes. Have 2 Quarters, 1 Appy and 1 nutcase TB. The mule is a whole other story. I’ll see if a pic of the boys will load (I have never cared for mares only geldings) ;)

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    #47347
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I think breaking style depends on how the individual views the horse. Is it a tool or a friend. I think there are pros and cons to both. One method we used to use on trouble horses or ones that liked to buck was to put a lunge line on either side of a halter, saddle the horse up and with rider aboard lead the horse into a long pit full of water that was about 4 feet deep. There would be a person on either side holding the lunge lines to keep the horse centered in the pit as we walked it through. The water and mud took a lot of power from the horse and made it harder to act up. We mostly did this after they had acted up as a sort of punishment but also to be able to keep working with the horse with less chance of injury to horse or rider. It also tired them out to the point where they didn’t have the energy left to buck.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of matt76 matt76.
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