Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #15724
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Has anyone made a water wheel for generating electricity?
    Ran across this today and am wondering how much of a pain in the ass this would be to make.

    Robin

    Homemade Water Wheel Electric Generator

    #15737
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Closest was rebuilding a WWII wind generator.
    This doesn’t look like too much of a challenge, but I would recommend using the best bearings you can get.

    #15748
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Robin,
    If you have a stream on your property you should investigate water tubines. They are more efficient and spin faster.
    Here are a few links that might be helpful:

    http://www.homepower.com/articles/microhydro-power/design-installation/microhydro-myths-misconceptions

    http://www.homepower.com/articles/microhydro-power/design-installation/electric-side-hydro-power/page/0/1

    #15755
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    Doesn’t seem like it’d be too much trouble in building one. I’ve actually been mulling the idea over in my mind as a potential alternate source of electricity generation. From what I understand, the best way to get the most energy production would be to have the water pour onto the wheel, versus having the wheel in a river/stream. That also means you do have a bit more control over the whole set up, as well as less potential damage should the river rise.

    Check out this episode of Rough Science, they make a small one.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #15759
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Red,

    The Romans figured out that an overshot wheel is many, many times more efficient than an undershot wheel. The falling water contains way more energy than water just poking along under the wheel… of course, making an overshot wheel would require at least partially damming up a water source and creating a sluice to dump the water over the wheel. But it can be done.

    Thing is, there’s a max RPM when dealing with an overshot wheel, which means you will need to build some sort of step-up transmission to spin your generator at anything approaching a useful velocity.

    Much more efficient would be to combine the two – make your dam and sluice but use a turbine like 74 said. If you design the turbine correctly, the water will “pull” the turbine instead of “push” it…. think if each blade as an airplane wing. Water hits the blade and creates a pulling effect instead of a “normal” pushing effect… you can get a turbine going really, really fast that way… but you’ll still need some type of gearing to spin the genny (which should be out of the water stream)…

    Good stuff! I give it two thumbs way, way up…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #15782
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    No matter what design is used the vertical head and gpm determine the amount of energy you can get out of the system. A big head lets you build a big wheel for more torque and gpm increases the size of the buckets increasing the wieght (torque) that came be converted to hp.

    With turbines and enclosed pipe more head equals more psi. High gpm values increases the potential to apply the psi to a larger surface area. If you can only supply a 1 inch pipe not so much power. A 12″ pipe is moving a lot of energy.

    #22660
    Profile photo of cigg
    cigg
    Survivalist
    member1

    So in design you could build a water wheel for the psi factor of a water pump than apply that to a turbine to spin the generator ? I have an old boat genny motor is shot but was thinking for a wind or a water system to drive it, it has 12v and 120v @ 33amps needs to run at 1700 rpm which be the better build?

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.