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  • #45415
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Just thought I would toss this out there…

    Been fighting a chest cold and a sinus infection for about half of this week. Which reminded me that I have never been on a deployment where I did not catch some kind of crud. Especially in cold weather. My immune system always fought it off fairly quickly – except once when I had walking pneumonia – but that doesn’t change the fact that I got the crud.

    In short: There is nothing worse than having to cowboy up and do what you gotta do when you feel like a can of hammered dog sh*t… all you want to do is curl into a ball under a blanket and sleep…

    I learned fairly quickly to keep a couple two or three little packets of Alka-seltzer Cold Plus Medicine under my canteen cup in my carrier. Always. The original stuff worked wonders. Canteen cup, water, dump in the tablets, suck it down (oh gawd it tasted awful) and in a half hour you’re good to hook. But, like anything good in this world, some idiot abused the stuff, middle, middle, middle, and it got pulled. The stuff they replaced it with works, but it’s not nearly as effective as the old stuff.

    Other than me crabbing about All Good Things in this world disappearing because of other people’s stupidity, hiding stuff like this away in your gear can make a truly sucky situation bearable. Well, okay, maybe not bearable, but at least it won’t suck nearly as badly…

    There’s other stuff, and I’ll post them in an effort to keep this little thread going… welcome other additions as well. I don’t have a monopoly on good ideas…

    Gonna go sleep now…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #45419
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    I hope you sleep well, dear friend.

    Malgus, you always make me smile, even when you feel a bit sick..sorry. Thanks

    #45424
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I can’t help on this thread. I’ve only ever been sick a few times in my life and I really don’t know the routine. Once I had food poisoning, wouldn’t wish that on anyone. Maybe twice I had a 24 hour bug type thing that went through my system in about 6 hours. Otherwise a cold every now and then but nothing that lays me low. Had one a couple years ago that did drain my energy.

    #45432
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Packets of EmergenC , like alka Seltzer , good to have in the field , as your diet isnt all that great to begin with , and might keep you from getting sick in the first place . NUUN rehydration tabs , for those that live in a warm climate and sweat , they work ! I went through a tube a day in death valley , I found lemon lime to be the least offensive flavor , none are sweet , which is the way you want it to be . Energy gel packets , some are better than others , but helps give a quick boost when you need to keep going , but feel yourself dragging a$$ . You might be able to substitute that for the military caffeinated chewing gum , depending on how you react to caffeine . After the morning cup of coffee , it doesnt do much for me . Small bottle of Iodine , works on many things . Easy to carry . Ginger powder ………in case you eat something that doesnt agree with you . Powders and tabs in general are good to have , dont weigh anything and dont take up hardly any space . I make my own “envelopes ” , by cutting small strips of paper , taping the edges , pouring whatever powder in , then taping the top .

    #45436
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Packets of EmergenC , like alka Seltzer , good to have in the field , as your diet isnt all that great to begin with , and might keep you from getting sick in the first place . NUUN rehydration tabs , for those that live in a warm climate and sweat , they work ! I went through a tube a day in death valley , I found lemon lime to be the least offensive flavor , none are sweet , which is the way you want it to be . Energy gel packets , some are better than others , but helps give a quick boost when you need to keep going , but feel yourself dragging a$$ . You might be able to substitute that for the military caffeinated chewing gum , depending on how you react to caffeine . After the morning cup of coffee , it doesnt do much for me . Small bottle of Iodine , works on many things . Easy to carry . Ginger powder ………in case you eat something that doesnt agree with you . Powders and tabs in general are good to have , dont weigh anything and dont take up hardly any space . I make my own “envelopes ” , by cutting small strips of paper , taping the edges , pouring whatever powder in , then taping the top .

    There was a rumor going around that the chewing gum in MRE’s had laxative in them… on our first deployment, we had this one kid who loved chewing gum went around begging everyone for their gum… so we gave him what he wanted. MRE’s have a habit of locking you up pretty good, sooo…

    He had a wad of chewing gum in his mouth the size of a small orange. After 20 minutes, he gets this look….

    “I’LLBERIGHTBACKYOUGUYSHEREWATCHMYSTUFF!!!!” and just tears off into the treeline at a dead sprint… which was pretty amazing because he was doing his best to make a fist with his butt – and succeeding – while still managing to sprint…

    He came walking back looking extremely exhausted about 15 minutes later… and also a bit sheepish. After we were done howling with laughter, we handled the gum with a bit more care. If there actually was laxative in the gum, then it made sense to save it until you actually had the time to do your necessaries properly…

    Once Gator Aid came out with mixable powder in packets, I always carried the orange flavor with me… it was better than that cruddy powder in the MRE’s and made warm canteen water taste about as good as it was ever going to… also salt and sugar packets we lifted from the gas station/restaurant/chow hall to make electrolytic water… what a taste treat that was (not). But, it kept you going. Gator Aid might not do much other than make you pee, but it tastes a damn sight better than gas station sugar and salt packets mixed with warm canteen water…

    Carrying stuff to patch up your feet paid dividends as well. Moleskin, powder, bandages, small pair of cuticle scissors, alcohol pads and antiseptic. Even lidocaine salve. Two pairs of spare dry socks in a ziplock baggie.

    You can’t carry the whole world, but you learn what works, what doesn’t, what’s rubbish and what’s worse than useless. That’s the crap you dump the first chance you get when nobody is looking…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #45438
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    The NUUN tabs are actually designed with pro athletes in mind , came about because gatorade……..just doesnt work and makes you more thirsty , the NUUN tabs replace salts and get into your system fast . I talked to this kid that just got out of the Army , one of his jokes was ” There is only one thief in the military , everybody else walks around looking for their sh*t ” . Thought that was pretty funny. Insoles for your boots work wonders , as we get older , things change , having more back problems or leg joint problems ? Insoles for your shoes may actually be the cure ……….its all connected .

    #45439
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    That’s pretty accurate.

    I despise a barracks thief. You learn quick to take whatever you don’t want stolen and sleep on top of it. The Army – and the Marines, I assume – berate you about locking up your stuff. They’re obsessed with it. So, everyone goes and buys Masterlocks… some guys repurpose the locks from their luggage, etc, on the cheap and use that…

    But what is little known about Masterlocks – and what they won’t tell you – is that there are only a finite number of ways to configure a lock and key. Masterlock knows this, so they split them up. They send half to the East Coast and half to the West Coast. In the military, you get folks from everywhere thrown together. Which means some keys and locks will interchange. And the scumbags know it. So, they go around with their own keys trying everyone else’s locks when nobody is around. Sooner or later, they’ll find one that’s compatible. Which is precisely why I don’t use Masterlocks if I can help it. I have a few series 5200 locks that I liberated. Those are freakin’ awesome and I highly recommend them… if you can find them. (Feebay)

    Or, they use the Mark I Combat Boot. Got a Masterlock? Not a problem. Take your boot, flip it around and bash the lock straight down using the heel. Make sure you hit it on the side that actually locks. Chances are, it will pop open if you hit it correctly and hard enough…

    Speaking of keys – I don’t know if the military has switched out to swipe cards 100%, but back in the day you used a key to get into your barracks room. Misplacing the key and/or locking yourself out of your own room was sort of a big deal. You got dinged for it. So, we learned quickly how to break back into our rooms. Go down to the hardware store and get one of those smallish pry bars. The ones less than a foot long. They’re thin enough to get between the door and the jamb. The door doesn’t go anywhere, but the jamb flexes out of the way and the door will pop open. It’s actually faster than using your key and doesn’t damage anything… they came in right handy.

    History channel ran some disaster/survival thing last year. Some ex-Marine running around in New Orleans in the destroyed areas doing the survival thing. Or maybe it was Detroit. I disremember exactly where. But he said one of the best things to carry in your gear was a small crowbar/pry bar. My reaction was: “Dude, we were doing that sh*t 20 years ago… “.

    One thing he did do that’s a good idea that I shamelessly stole was carrying a chunk of spark plug. The white bit, not the other end. That white bit will go clean through a car window with little effort. Don’t know why. Don’t care why. All’s I care about is that it works and having the means to smash out a car window with little effort might be a thing I have to do come SHTF….

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #45445
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Spring loaded center punches work really well to get through even tempered glass. We used them all the time when I worked ambulance and volunteer fire department.

    I always liked the flat nail remover type crowbars more than the thinner bladed type ones. The nail remover type ones are wider and have a bit of a sharpened edge to more easily force into the gap. Still have a couple laying around my tool box. Leave it to a Marine to figure out what works and the Navy Corpsman to make the process better!

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #45447
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Pre shtf it’s probably wise to have an assortment of tools that would not be assumed to be burglary equipment just in case you’re stopped by le. Akin to having a bat, ball and glove in the car; not just a bat.

    #45460
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    As simple as it may seem, a lot of people don’t realize that many doors are terribly unsecure against a very thin plastic card (thinner than most credit cards – more like the info cards people sometimes give out with calendars or business info to fit in your wallet). They flex nicely, and depending on the configuration of a door, can often pop open the door by fitting it on the other side of the curved portion of the lock mechanism, gradually working it further and further out of the hole until the door just pulls or pushes open. Better doors and locks have ways around that, but it’s surprising how many still can be entered using thin (and therefore flexible) plastic cards. I helped several former co-workers get back in their offices when they forgot their keys were inside, and the NCOIC wasn’t around to get in the key box. More true of interior doors than exterior ones, but some of those can even still be opened. (No, I am NOT advocating burglary, of course, nor do I suspect anyone else here is doing the same. Just sayin’.)

    #45464
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I like to have a large plastic garbage bag with me. It can be used for an emergency rain poncho for someone, rain protection for equipment, they work well as a duffle bag there’s no end to what you can throw in one and carry or move. As long as the objects are not long, pointed or sharp. They can keep clothing and equipment clean when you need to keep dirt off your material. You can disguise valuables as garbage if you must leave them insight of others.; like a backpack in the car. Just don’t forget what you put in them and throw it away…. Duooh!

    #45482
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Mal,
    This suggestion isn’t really about gear but it does have to do with a cold remedy. For sinus infections……you’re gonna think I’m nuts……..snort a small amount of lime or lemon juice up each nostril one or two times a day for two days. WARNING YOU WILL DISCOVER SINUS PASSAGES YOU NEVER KNEW YOU HAD!!!!! The atomic explosion in your sinus cavity only last a few minutes lol. The acid in the juice makes the PH in your sinuses acidic killing the infection also there are several other vitamins and minerals in the juice that will help. I have battled sinus infections all my life and just recently tried this. The infection was gone by the 3rd day.

    #45484
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    As long as we’re on home remedies, I have one for poison ivy that’s never failed me yet. Scratch it to your heart’s content and then pour vinegar on it. It burns a lot but in a way that feels good at the same time. It stops the itch and by the next day the poison ivy rash is gone. One caveat though is my body responds very quickly to things. If I get a mosquito bite, the welt only takes a few seconds to form and in half an hour it is gone entirely. If I get a bee or wasp sting, the welt and pain is instantaneous, and an hour later it is entirely gone as if it never happened. I somehow think this is all tied to a robust immune system which is why I never get sick.

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