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  • #42651
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Hi Guys,

    I’m working on something just now and need some feedback if possible? I’m trying to establish if there is an ‘average’ ratio of amounts people spend on equipment, and then on (any, if at all) training. It seems to me there is a total disparity in personal budget allocations in this regard but need to crunch some real numbers before I can expand on the idea further.

    Anyone that wants to give me a ‘rough figure’ on there spending to date on :
    A) Preps
    B) Training

    In this thread or via PM, or if you (understandably) don’t want to mention specific amounts, just quickly calculate your ratio and please share that. Mine is unrepresentative as I purchased a LOT of (somewhat specialised) equipment to go into my company (Survival School) and so it messes with the overall figures…

    Many thanks for any help/figures/info you can provide!

    Best wishes

    Toby

    #42652
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Well , thats a good question . I dont have a ratio , I look around and mental note what I need , then look around at the best prices to get it . At times , some of the things I would like to have are just too expensive , and if so , I put money away for it to get at a later date . THis is probably true for many people , cover your basics first , then spread out from there . Unfortunately , it never really ends .

    #42653
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    I agree with Tolik….. I picked up a second job to buy what I felt that I actually needed. This included a lot of firearms, ammo, equipment, fuel storage, hand grinders/mills, etc….

    Now that I am caught up I am getting ready to quit the second job and get back to building things.

    The reason I had to get a second job was because my normal expenses were higher than what allotted me the ability to purchase what I thought I needed in a timely manner. What I suggest is that you do what you would do if you were putting back for a down payment, vacation, etc. Just find a percentage to save from each check, make a list of what you need, and then get the items as you see good deals. It all really depends on how much you feel you can put part with from each check.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #42654
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Took a while to think about this, and still don’t have a good answer.

    Having started rebuilding recently after both a personal financial crisis and moving (selling/abandoning a bunch of stuff), my focus is on the little things.
    However, I’ve gotten the family on board with buying “useful stuff” instead of useless junk for holidays/birthdays so that’s actually helping. For my last birthday I received a dehydrator, it’s making a difference in what and how I/we store.

    For years my focus was roughly 80% on firearms and ammo. Being a gun nut (aka gunsmith) that figure may be low.
    Now it barely registers, at least for now. We’re re-evaluating our real needs for the rebuild.

    Training? That also depends on your concept of expense.
    As a firearms instructor, that side is covered both personally and through the business as a write-off.
    Other training? My ‘job’ requires both CPR and First Aid training yearly which I just went through, supplied by them.
    As a former Scoutmaster and current Troop Committee member, I am part of all the trainings that happen and get them free or at a greatly reduced rate (certain outside instructors classes). Plus it helps your own skills when you’re teaching others those skills, i.e. teaching the Scouts.

    Right now, we’re just trying to catch up, preps are second to real life.

    #42658
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Toby
    I don’t think many people approach preparing with a ratio in mind. I also think there are a lot of variables that could skew your numbers. Whirli is a good example. There is a great deal of training he has that an occupation or a group he belongs to paid for. The training was critical but its real dollar cost to him was 0. Peoples varying degree of abilities will also make it hard to pin down a number. People who have never done much in the outdoors but see danger coming are prepping in a panic. Some are wiser than others and realize all the gadgets in the world are no good if you don’t know how to use them, while others are trying to buy all they can “before all the good stuff is gone” and think they will figure out how to get good at using the items later. Maybe instead of focusing on the dollar ratio people do spend you could work on a suggested gear to training ratio. For example for each piece of gear train or use the piece of gear 1 hour a week until you are proficient with it. Even better still would be a list of basic skills and gear that could be used in most emergency situations and have them arranged in order of useful value. Once the list was put together a person could look at the list and determine where they were lacking and have a guideline on what they should focus on first. There are many on this forum whom this list might seem elementary to but I see knew people every day here that are just getting started. I think something like that could save them a lot of money. It might help with the “ooooo shiny” struggle as well, but that’s just my 2 cents.

    #42665
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’ve never kept track but I know I have spent far more on stuff than I have on training. That said, a lot of training isn’t formal. Having a veggie garden for example is training as far as I am concerned and I have spent a lot on gardening. A formal training that I did do that few would ever think of is I took a 6 week course (all day each Saturday) on hearth cooking. We were taught 1700’s methods using an original 1700’s hearth in a museum house. At the end of each class we made a meal of what we cooked that day. It was incredibly empowering and come a grid-down scenario will prove very useful.

    #42672
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Great answers so far, thanks Guys. Matt76, I’m sort of trending in that direction, I’m exploring the aspect that people buy/have/want a lot of ‘stuff’ but spend VERY little time either learning how to use it, OR learning how to make do without it :P I really want to write on this more, but want to have some authentic ‘numbers’ to back up my ideas, hence the original question. Wit these in hand I feel much more confident to expand on this topic…!

    Occupational/Volunteer training, that’s a great angle I hadn’t thought much about, very useful, but practically ‘free’ in ‘real money’ terms…

    Hmmm, all GREAT stuff to think more on :)

    #42676
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Matt’s and Whirli’s answers got me to thinking…..

    I have never been a big “training” guy in the sense of taking classes. After having been in the military and working with USMC grunts for as long as I did, having started shooting and hunting around age 4, and having lived as rural as I did for so many years of my life I can finally (thanks Flatlander) admit that I do take a lot of things for granted. Most people that I run into that are “class goers” are so set in their form, “scenarios,” or range habits that I find them almost ineffective if they had to perform for real. Of course EVERY class goer or class teacher will disagree with me, but I think that familiarity and understanding of how to handle the firearm in day to day situations is far more important that the funny stance taught in “tactical handgun” classes. Having lived the life I have and been in the various situations I have been in that required the use of firearms I personally don’t think they these “tactical stances” really are that beneficial in real world settings. When 90% of the people in a firefight spray and pray the 10% who can effectively operate their weapon system have a higher probability of coming out on top – imo.

    So like was mentioned by MB, you don’t have to pay for training in many cases. Get an airsoft and carry it around all day long while doing your daily tasks. Make everyone around you drop you for 20 pushups every time you muzzle flash someone and 40 every time it hits the dirt or is left unattended. You will learn muzzle control/safety in no time at all and will probably learn to keep your hands on your weapon at all times within a day. BOOM! Training on this is complete.

    Then practice marksmanship. Get good at that and then practice target acquisition drills. Once you can do that, practice fire and movement. All the while you don’t even have to have a real firearm. Much can be learned with an airsoft, several 2 liter bottles and an understanding wife…..

    Other training ideas:
    Get into SAR. You will get your FCC ticket, first aid, CPR, and learn to track all for a nominal fee or just cost of gear.
    Hunters Education
    Boy Scouts
    Explorer program
    Church groups with outdoors type programs

    Just look around. There are all sorts of opportunities out there and you don’t have to make a 5-10 year commitment. Volunteer, learn, get what you need out of the program and move along to something new…..

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #42677
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    For me most of my training is practical application. I see a need, research it, and try to do it. As a result, I’ve learned from my mistakes. Like a lot of others I tend to be a gear guy, but have reached a point where I don’t need more “stuff”.

    I appreciate what you are trying to accomplish, but I’m not sure you can quantify it. I’ve taken firearms training, but also learned a lot about gardening from a guy whose garden was the envy of the neighborhood.

    Not sure if that helps, but I would definitely be interested in the results.

    #42678
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Spot on Sled. Real world experience trumps classroom tactics every time. When it comes to firearms training, classes are good to learn strategies and basic weapons handling but every situation and every individual are different. What I am physically capable of may be very different than say a guy who weighs 300 lbs in good shape or not. Those aspects need to be taken into consideration and adapted for. Thus the reason for practice. As far as spending goes I have probably spent the most on guns and ammo, followed by supplies and have spent very little if anything on training. I also fall into a similar category as Sled and Whirli. I was never military or law enforcement but grew up hunting, fishing and camping. My previous jobs have provided training in first aid, CPR and vertical rescue. Sled made another good point that might be worthy of another list, places to get training for free or little cost. Search and rescue, volunteer fire departments, and other community facilities like the YMCA would be a good place to start. Doing a short stint as a life guard at the Y would get you CPR certification as well as first aid and water rescue techniques Toby if I had to give a ratio of my spending it would be probably around 85/10/5.
    85-guns and ammo 10-supplies 5-training but it would not be a good representation of my actual standing as my employers have spent considerably more on my training. If you were to get a ratio by experience/useful value it would look more like 70/20/10. 70-training/experience 20-guns and ammo 10-supplies and that could be a deceptive ratio as well considering it is my ratio and not another individuals. Our numbers could look the same but another older individual could be vastly more experienced than I, have more guns than me and more supplies.

    #42692
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    I have been prepping since 1983. I was still on active duty and that was a problem. The Navy spent a ton on training me and others like me.
    When I retired in 1997 I started the physical part of prepping (buying stuff.) From 1997 to 2010 my prepping expenditures were 90 % on material items (guns, ammo, food, etc etc.) The 10% remaining was spent on going to “events” of physical type.
    In my group of preppers we train each other. There is no cost involved unless it is food or more ammo to replace what we shot.
    Robin

    #42695
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    I’m always learning new stuff. I don’t know what will be useful and what won’t be. But you really never know. lol

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