Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
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  • #36086
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Great advice. One thing that is really tricky about fire is how often it gets underestimated. There is a sort of tipping point and after that fire spreads so rapidly its something many people don’t know about.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #36087
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Mtb, It sounds like you have fixed almost everything. The insulation on wiring dating back to the 70’s was plastic and you would have all romex type with grounds. I wouldn’t be concerned about an electrical fire.

    #36088
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    I’ve seen house fires that started as car fires when people park their cars to close to outside walls. They have somekind of gas leak in the engine and that catches which then spreads and ignites the house siding. The old vinyl siding burns hot and smokey.

    #36092
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I agree with 74, You should not have a problem MB.

    #36215
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    A few of the homes that I repaired had the old, old wiring. Bare wire going everywhere in the attic. It would run to a ceramic insulator and tie with other bare wires. Several times I climbed out and said I would not work in the attic. Best to check things out before you commit!
    Robin

    #36220
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    If the insulation is still on the wires and not broken knob & tube eiring is safe. The distance between the wires is helpful and the porcelain insulators work well. But don’t move any wires. The insulation has deteriorated and is very brittle.

    #36380
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The ceramic insulator wiring was used in the 1920’s to I believe 1940’s. If you touch the neutral and the positive wire and are grounded then you are in trouble. I have rewired many homes with the old wiring. Interesting the way they were done. I did a 1923 home last year so they last a long time and the copper wire were still like new when I cut them.

Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)

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