Viewing 12 posts - 16 through 27 (of 27 total)
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  • #28332
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I’m hoping my PD mans a few road blocks.

    #28333
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    Good post, only two things i disagree with personally is the idea of heading to the local armory, people do that in SHTF like katrina as often as they head to wallmart. so for me its a big NOPE, if the LEO goes home to protect his family and leaves a war room wide open to looters how long is the family gonna last. armory doesn’t interest me. Not only that, but its an easily anticipated strategic move… I recommend you send Jethro through that door first to collect your treasures.

    As much as i hate COD, ( and i do, i really hate COD)

    I believe 100% that the ability to generate a mental map, and the development of strategic thinking that ALL war games encourage has as much value as the tactics and muscle memory developed in physical real life training, during which btw, you will never be exposed to nearly as many psychology of enemies, and I would never dismiss any chance to learn anything about anyone. People who say the internet is anti social, games are anti social have mental issues that starts with a capital STUBBORN, something new and novel they have never even dreamed of encountering is gonna surprise them one day, and it won’t surprise me a bit when the younger crowd starts pulling all these wonderful tricks they have learned from going to war EVERY… SINGLE… DAY…

    But you know, if you want to close yourself off to new ideas or ways of thinking thats your choice ***** eating grin*.

    All I have to say to that is, can I have your stereo?

    “A mans life on earth is war.”

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #28335
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    One thing all the Day-z & Arma types are learning is to shoot first & ambushes just so they can take your gear and not give it a second thought. .

    #28339
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    I was creating a video series a year or 2 ago in regards to human psycology and day z. But decided not to upload it because i did not have editing software. Also the ethics… of teaching people things like that…

    If I still have the ambush footage I will upload it this week. I just wont explain anything in it, it should be pretty evident that i knew exactly what was going to happen, and why the vic was going to go where he went … because i have seen the behavior repeatedly both in the virtual world and real life…

    its like corners… check your corners… real life and virtual, its the same rule… first person shooter or war stratagy… people love corners… its a human quirk you can observe in almost everything we do…

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #28537
    Profile photo of Inshala
    Inshala
    Veteran
    member4

    KOS,

    Good counter-point in regards to COD. Personally, I hate COD because I’ve seen the influence it has on much of our youth…not in the sense of creating antisocial behavior, but in creating a false sense of experience and knowledge. We’ve referred to these guys as “Army Nerds” from time to time. The only reason why I even mentioned COD is because I read a lengthy post by another member that could have only been inspired by a video game. It lacked any common sense, but was VERY technical.

    In regards to your statement, I suppose it is the closest team building/problem solving simulation to a SHTF situation that is offered to the general population. Let me ask you this: Instead of a video game, how do you feel about paint ball? The reason why I offer this alternative is because a video game offers no apathetic experience to the scenarios it processes. By this, I mean that I remember playing a COD-type video game and thinking, “There is no way in hell I can carry this much gear and run this far and this fast!” Although I have never played civilian styled paint ball, I was thinking about organizing a team and keeping honed that way.

    "If I'm gonna die, I'm gonna die historic on the Fury Road."

    #28538
    Profile photo of Inshala
    Inshala
    Veteran
    member4

    unDRGrond,

    You had a plan and you were open-minded enough to adjust it to the situation. That’s pretty much the bottom line to my whole post! I have to admit that I really liked your original plan, but as you quoted, “Best laid plans….”. Unfortunately, I have no fine-tuned carry-out load organized. My current idea would look something like:
    1) AR platform main patrol rifle. I’m leaning towards an M16A4 clone since I want the reach and velocity of a long gun combined with the versatility of an M4 carbine. Unfortunately, it is ILLEGAL for me to own one of these in Occupied New York.
    2) Beretta M9 as a sidearm. Let me just say that I strongly dislike the Beretta M9, but I’ve trained so frequently with it that it’s as familiar to me as my own living room. Also, 9MM is still more common than .45 ACP and is still the primary pistol of the U.S. Armed Forces. Unfortunately, I am limited to buying the NY SAFE Act compliant version.
    3) Remington Mod 700 in sniper configuration…simple, light, and proven distance shooter. Used by BOTH police agencies and military, it is also fully legal to own in my state without any serious altercations or limitations. The only problem would be figuring out if I should get it in 5.56X45 in order to keep the need for ammo streamlined or 7.62X51 for that extra power.
    4) Mossberg 500 with ghost ring sights. Again, used by both military and civilian police its a good room clearing/CQC/MOUT weapon, and legal in my state.
    Needless to say that I would not be carrying all of theses weapons with basic combat load at all times.

    "If I'm gonna die, I'm gonna die historic on the Fury Road."

    #28539
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Inshala,
    I’m pretty certain the post regarding COD is by a person with no firearms experience and some other factors clouding his thoughts.

    I like your loadout options but have the same limitations in carrying capacity (as we all do). It means outfitting a small group with various weapons like a squad would have. I think I can outfit 10 members with a various long guns and hand guns.

    #28540
    Profile photo of Inshala
    Inshala
    Veteran
    member4

    Whirlibird,

    “Is gun, is shoot”. LOVE IT! I read in another post, somewhere in the forums, that you are the resident firearms expert. I look forward to hearing your input on such topics.

    I know exactly what you mean in regards to favorites. The first large bore rifle I recall firing was an old, lightly used German K98 Mauser WWII bring back. It was a simple weapon (except for stripping the bolt), the action was smooth, the weight was moderate, and the recoil rudely reminded me of what I was shooting. I grew up shooting 8MM Mauser and even entered junior level competition shooting using a WWII German bolt action rifle. I must admit that I was pretty good with it. I often romanticized that a sniper configuration of it would be my primary weapon should the SHTF. As I matured, I realized that it was not practical. As is, in a “peacetime” situation, finding noncorrosive 8MM Mauser ammo is difficult and EXPENSIVE!! I couldn’t imagine how difficult it would be scrounging for ammo after supplies are long exhausted. On the other hand, if I had the opportunity to use one, I think that I would be proficient in using it more so than your modern military-style weapon. So….I get your point.

    As far as armories are concerned, I think most of the readers are getting “wrapped around the axle” about that suggestion. A police station armory, as well as a National Guard/Reserve weapons room, should be a vaulted chamber similar to the safety deposit box room at your local bank. It would be, by no means, an easy nut to crack. It will be; however, the source by which such supplies are distributed. As I mentioned earlier, the hardware will have to be issued out to the patrols and now more accessible than locked up in a safe. I was trying to avoid the obvious for fear of what the reaction would be, but when hell breaks loose, there will be DEAD soldiers…there will be DEAD police officers….and there will be DEAD civilians that might have the needed items on or near them. Chances are the recently deceased LE and military might have what you need. I know, it sounds ghoulish and morbid and, truth be told, I hate mentioning it….but it’s pragmatic. Example: If you come across a military police patrol that was ambushed and currently off fighting the aggressors, it might be a good time to pick over whatever hardware was left behind before they return.

    "If I'm gonna die, I'm gonna die historic on the Fury Road."

    #28542
    Profile photo of Inshala
    Inshala
    Veteran
    member4

    74,
    Team dynamics…that’s a whole ‘nother can ‘o worms! lol
    I completely agree with you, though.

    "If I'm gonna die, I'm gonna die historic on the Fury Road."

    #28566
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Inshala wrote:</div>Whirlibird,

    “Is gun, is shoot”. LOVE IT! I read in another post, somewhere in the forums, that you are the resident firearms expert. I look forward to hearing your input on such topics.

    I know exactly what you mean in regards to favorites. The first large bore rifle I recall firing was an old, lightly used German K98 Mauser WWII bring back. It was a simple weapon (except for stripping the bolt), the action was smooth, the weight was moderate, and the recoil rudely reminded me of what I was shooting. I grew up shooting 8MM Mauser and even entered junior level competition shooting using a WWII German bolt action rifle. I must admit that I was pretty good with it. I often romanticized that a sniper configuration of it would be my primary weapon should the SHTF. As I matured, I realized that it was not practical. As is, in a “peacetime” situation, finding noncorrosive 8MM Mauser ammo is difficult and EXPENSIVE!! I couldn’t imagine how difficult it would be scrounging for ammo after supplies are long exhausted. On the other hand, if I had the opportunity to use one, I think that I would be proficient in using it more so than your modern military-style weapon. So….I get your point.

    As far as armories are concerned, I think most of the readers are getting “wrapped around the axle” about that suggestion. A police station armory, as well as a National Guard/Reserve weapons room, should be a vaulted chamber similar to the safety deposit box room at your local bank. It would be, by no means, an easy nut to crack. It will be; however, the source by which such supplies are distributed. As I mentioned earlier, the hardware will have to be issued out to the patrols and now more accessible than locked up in a safe. I was trying to avoid the obvious for fear of what the reaction would be, but when hell breaks loose, there will be DEAD soldiers…there will be DEAD police officers….and there will be DEAD civilians that might have the needed items on or near them. Chances are the recently deceased LE and military might have what you need. I know, it sounds ghoulish and morbid and, truth be told, I hate mentioning it….but it’s pragmatic. Example: If you come across a military police patrol that was ambushed and currently off fighting the aggressors, it might be a good time to pick over whatever hardware was left behind before they return.

    Don’t know about ‘expert’ but I do make my living gunsmithing and training.

    Gonna ramble a bit here.

    Last first,
    Dead people and their stuff.
    Touchy subject, especially for LE types.
    While I can understand the picking up of useful gear and making use of it, there are inherent risks.
    A number of LE guns are ‘marked’ with badges, PD markings and special serial numbers. Suddenly how you came into possession of that gun/gear would be a serious question from any LEO that you’d come across later. That ‘family’ tie of those behind the badge and all.

    Another threat, whoever killed those people, are they still around? Why did they leave the gear and stuff?
    Are they watching and using the people/gear as bait? Boobytraps?

    Next, most PD armories are either a closet or part of the evidence room. Secure? That varies heavily.

    That Mauser you mention, it’s not a bad choice, it’s just one that must be well thought out beforehand.
    I have a ZF-41 8mm Mauser here that I’ve dumped into a beat up sporterized stock.
    Good ammo is danged expensive and rare.
    But at the same time I have a couple hundred rounds of good handloaded hunting ammo in new brass, a portable reloading setup, a bullet mold and all the needed gear to sit at a fire or table and restuff the empties for a long time. I have the same setup for a number of ‘emergency’ guns.

    With that Mauser, I’m better armed than many out there, as I have spent hours at the range with it, and in the field. I know where it shoots and it’s and my capabilities with it.
    That couple hundred rounds equates to thousands of pounds of big game meat, possible defensive use, and uncounted small game critters.
    And a 8mm bullet at 10Y will make a bad guy change his mind just like a .223 or .308.

    It is certainly not ideal, not fast or flashy.
    But it’s paid for and it’s here waiting.
    And that beats the trick AR sitting on the shelf at work, or the local gun shop.

    Some may be surprised how well you can do in an “urban rifle” class with a decent old bolt gun.
    Fact is, I like to mess with my students in the larger classes and have them line up, set down their rifle and gear, then take two steps either right or left.
    That way they get to use someone else’s gun/gear and experience something different.
    I often put a levergun or bolt gun in the mix to mess with the shooters.

    Scrounging ammo.
    Tough one. There have been ‘salted’ rounds over the years left behind in various locations to mess with insurgents. I certainly would be careful depending on circumstances as to what I was picking up. Much depends on the how long and where, as to this possibility.
    The Germans and Russians both left ‘bad’ ammo behind in various locations in WWII and Afghanistan.
    Might someone do that again?

    We can always look at “Butter Knife Guns” and cause some people a number of nightmares.
    The BKG, that old deer rifle/shotgun/pistol that grandpa left behind with a handful of ammo.
    It can defend you, it can provide meat, and it can be used to gain a better gun.
    Once you have gotten that newly ‘dropped gun’ from above, you pass the BKG off to someone else to do the same.
    Then you use your capture to gain other arms and gear.
    That pistol may supply you a rifle, which may gather some grenades and a LMG.
    It all depends on circumstance and your scruples.

    #28688
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thank you Inshala, good post, great points.

    #29314
    Profile photo of Vep
    Vep
    Survivalist
    member4

    A lot of SHTF prepping can depend upon what ‘SHTF’ actually is. In the USA, the sudden calamity tends to be localized, like Katrina. However, even in Katrina it wasn’t a war, and a pump shotgun, hunting rifle, or a handgun was typically more than enough to discourage looters. Did anyone there need many $thousands in weapons and ammo?

    For example, one guy put his irreplaceable items (photos, documents, etc) into a backpack, loaded his M1911, and took a bicycle north until he found a bus stop that was still operational. He then took a bus to a regional airport and then caught a flight to relatives.

    IMHO, too many survivalists and preppers in the USA spend too much material resources and mental energy prepping to fight a war. Too many are bullet rich and dollar short, or they have lots of ammo, but food and medical has been a secondary priority. If you have the extra cash and a fortress, by all means store what you want if it makes you happy. Just remember that odds are, like most of us here, that you aren’t in military anymore and you don’t have the supply or medical backup the military has. So, taking their approach to things will, at some point, turn into an exercise in futility. For a survivalist or prepper a different approach is needed.

    The one SHTF that we know is coming, it’s not speculation, just math at this point, is an economic crash. Those are usually a long, slow, grinding catastrophe, not a sudden, one day or overnight deal. Unless your fortress is absolutely secure economically you might have to relocate as things worsen, and it’s hard to do that with several tons of gear. Do you owe money on your house? Do you rent? If the answer to either is yes, be ready to move if need be.

    There are many other events which can also force a relocation, most of them actually. Anything you cannot move in one trip is a wasted resource. So, something to consider is keeping your logistics simple, practical, and workable. Keep your planning low key and sustainable. Defense planning is a given, but food acquisition and replenishment is a much higher priority. Always keep in mind the high possibility of, “What if we have to leave and not come back?”

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