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  • #7350
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    For the folks that have (and gonna have) BOL in their plans some qualities need to be there.

    For example for me it is land (usable), water sources, fuel sources, group of people ( some kind of community, friends or family etc.) reasonably distance from urban centers, conditions for setting some good defense (natural barriers, using some advantages etc.) possibility of using multiple ways to get there (in case of road blocks and similar) etc.

    What are the your concerns in setting up your BOL?
    With what you are satisfied and on what you need to work more?

    #7364
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    - Good land for crops and animals
    – Several options for obtaining drinking water
    – It can be defended well
    – Different options for alt. energy production (wind, solar, hydro)
    – Away from large population centres and strategic military targets
    – Not in an area prone to much natural disasters
    – Preferably have lots of trees for cutting firewood/building material
    – Many types of wild game an fish

    Those are what I think you should look at when considering a BOL. A few things can be added, or subtracted, but like I said that’s what I like.

    In my situation, we don’t have much land, but it’s pretty good. Lots of good water, with rivers, ponds, and 2 wells for me. Pretty easy to defend, especially at depth which is what I advocate. I could set up a multitude of different alt. energy production if I could throw the money/ingenuity at it. I’m in the middle of no where so that’s great. We do get bad storms and hurricanes, and there’s always the threat of fire no matter where you are. Tonnes of wood to be had, the same goes for fish and game.

    So overall, I’m pretty well set location wise.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #7371
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Looks good Mr. Red, I am pretty much satisfied too, but I still need to work on alternate energy production.

    #7376
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    We looked and looked for a few years.

    As getting older, wanted a place we could afford that was in good condition,
    – had some infrastructure already as felt we were a bit ‘late’ to the game
    – good soil
    – controllable and various water supply
    – some timber for wood
    -within a day of a smaller place that eventually might become a resupply/trade place
    -not easily reached from major roads
    -higher than 500′ elevation
    -protected by mountains (for high winds, flood issues)
    -in/near small farming/country community of like minded people still with skills
    -defensible – ways to get up higher and see for a distance what might be coming/going on/approaching
    -place to raise fish

    Biggest problem right now is lots to do and never enough hands or time to do all would like and still wrok/practice skills. Universal problem

    #7382
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    To me it would depend on if the location were meant for short or long term use , if short term , protection and safety . Long term , remoteness , ability to perhaps grow things , protection ,and safety ….in either case , access to water reasonably close by would be my considerations .

    In some parts of the country , there are low populated areas , some with a spiderweb of logging roads , etc. It would be possible to go mountain man for a time . Maine for example , Alaska for another . The right vehicle to get there , for example , in the Southwest , lot of empty land , but getting to places might require you to dump your truck/car and then proceed in a quad or on foot .
    Once you have scouted an area , and are reasonably confident of it , you could go ahead and get a head start on the food situation . There is what some people call ” commando gardening ” , its risky only because there is no guarantee that anything will happen , but can be done all over .

    Basically you let nature take its course , you plant seeds in an area , with fruits and vegetables that self seed , obviously there needs to be water or enough rainfall , so when you do it , is important . Then hopefully , when you get there , you have several plants that have taken over an area for you to use . Yes , birds and animal will eat them while you are gone , but sometimes that also helps spread seed around .

    #7384
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I would like to add , sometimes you can do this legally , my experience is in the SW , in my state , there are vast areas that are owned by the state , you may not be able to buy it , but it is very common for people to lease it ….ranchers do this a lot . Then you have legal reason to be on the property and fix it up ( discretely ) as you wish . Google earth could be a good tool for basic scouting .

    #7640
    bushrat
    bushrat
    Survivalist
    member4

    Being retired, we had to unfortunately make some compromises. Stuck in a small community, we are at the end of a dead end street. A fair amount of wood is available on the property and within a short walk. We have garden space big enough to provide for ourselves and maybe two other people, blackberry bushes, and will be putting in a couple apple trees soon. Some small game in the immediate area, but would have to walk about 300yds for deer or turkey. So I would imagine everyone else will be hunting the same game.

    My dream property would be min 5 acres, a year ’round pond and/or creek (that may sound funny, but we lived in areas where not every creek or pond was full throughout the year) and a good well. Lots of small and large game, and fishing available, about 50% trees and sitting back in the hills with one dirt road in and out. Relatively level, but with good drainage and about an acre of garden space w/ berry bushes and fruit trees.

    These are some of the things i would want on my dream property.

    #7642
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Just a note, Tolik. Maine may have a spiderweb of logging roads, but most of Alaska is either mountain, or muskeg (swampy with zillions of mosquitos–even drive the wildlife insane). There are only 5 roads in all of Alaska (well, maybe 7). Most people travel the rivers, via boat in summer, sno-go or pickup truck in winter on the ice. Or of course, bush plane. Don’t forget the darkness of winter there, or -60F winters…been there, done that… Many people dream of bugging out to Alaska, but unless you’ve been there a while to get the feel of it, it’s what I call “magnificent but merciless.”
    For the young and strong, a great place. For the old and rich (lots of equipt) also great. Poor and old (me), not so much.

    #7664
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I have only been to Alaska in the summer , but I did live in Maine for a few years , they do have a spiderweb of logging roads , most are abandoned because they only use them for a single season , but the old ones will get you very far into the interior . I was just mentioning both those states because they both have a relatively low population , and you could theoretically go inland and live undetected .

    #7666
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Samoa …………that would be a good place to be trapped , not many tourists go there , and has a low , friendly population . They dont depend on the world for much of anything and vice versa .

    #7669
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Don’t haveba BOL anymore, moving changed thst.

    Requirements?
    Water
    Tilable land
    A growing season
    Fish/game in area
    Timber of some sort

    There were areas back in Iowa and Missouri that fit that perfectly.

    #7691
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    Great tips here, everyone.
    I don’t currently have a BOL, so these tips are very helpful while I choose one.
    Thanks!

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