Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 32 total)
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  • #23557
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    I am leaving early next week for a job in North Dakota. It is a long way from there to Florida, approximately 2,200 miles. So I have been giving thought to how I would get back home if the SHTF. I have a few contacts along the route, family and friends, that I could stop at but I figure I would ultimately end up on foot for the final leg of the journey if I was unable to get fuel or have vehicle issues.

    I will be there with my son and his father in law, so I would not have to go it alone and I have one friend that it looks like will be going up there in a month or so. If something happens we would most likely traveling together to get back home so that would be a bonus because there is strength in numbers.

    So I want to prepare for being able to drive and/or walk, hitch hike or beg, borrow or steal transportation to get home.

    I have a few ideas but am open to any suggestions. Please comment.

    #23559
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Buy some Life Straws so you can drink out of any water supply. Leave early when you see it coming so you are not traveling when SHTF. Pheonix walking from North Dakota to Florida in a SHTF would be an epic journey equal to Lewis & Clark. Only they probably had an easier time of it then you would on your trip. I think you will have a lot more hostile Indians to contend with.

    #23562
    Profile photo of ronym
    ronym
    Survivalist
    member5

    always carry foldable bike in your car
    it’s better riding a bike
    than walking by foot
    by foot we can walk 10-20 km per day
    but by riding a bike even 40 km are possible
    and by the way… carrying foldable bike are not only for SHTF situation
    we can use in our daily life
    ( sometimes driving a car even in our work area are not possible, like in mining company, fuel refining facility, electric plant, etc… imagine if we have to walk 2 km from parking area to actual workplace
    or we can use bicycle as emergency “mobile unit”

    #23564
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Pheonix let’s be blunt. The likelihood of you traveling 2,200 miles in SHTF and making it in time to be of help is about as likely as winning the lottery. We are talking about a major SHTF where standard transportation is a no go, be it EMP, Gov takeover or whatever other variable you want to apply. I don’t know what level of preps you have at home now but If the threat is so widespread that standard transportation is unusable for any distance, what is the likelihood your loved ones will still be in place by the time you arrive home. Even if you had all the supplies you needed and were able to travel 22 miles a day that’s over 3 months. I think your best prep would be to put whatever measures in place that are needed to make sure those left at home can make it without you. I know this idea sucks and the thought of not being there breaks your heart but it is what it is. I’m not saying don’t even try to go home but a heck of a lot can happen in 3 months and that is what you need to prepare for. You may make it home, it’s just a matter of when. The other option is don’t go.

    #23570
    Profile photo of ronym
    ronym
    Survivalist
    member5

    come on…
    at least give him a “hope”
    .
    yeah… sometimes just relying “hope” cannot help us
    when reality kicks in

    #23571
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Good advices.
    It make sense to think about water like one of the priorities, to have mean to drink clean water.
    It is good thing that you are not alone, that you have two men that you can trust.
    That kind of distance would be almost impossible to cover in case of some serious SHTF event. I would consider to brake that trip in some small parts, with lot of “stations” ,maybe to give a thought about that, to have as more possible (and secure) stops as you can.

    Think deeper, it is more likely that you gonna need camping gear (walking many miles on foot) then extra fuel most probably it is gonna be impossible to drive all the way, dangers, low profile etc)

    #23572
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    He can get home, just leave before the shtf so your not fighting everything along the way. That would apply to anyone that has to get somewhere.

    #23573
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Of course 74, best choice always is to recognize coming SHTF and be home on time, but sometimes it is impossible to see it coming.

    #23575
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Pheonix, ronym is right buy bikes for everyone and the water filters since water is heavy you will only be able to carry so much at the beginning. With a bike riding 10 miles an hour you can do 100 to 160 miles a day.

    #23579
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    How long do you anticipate being away? If it’s a long time maybe you should look at having your family follow you, or at least move several states closer to you.

    My normal advice for prepping is to give oneself as many options as possible, so if one path closes there may still be scope for action in Plans B or C. I like to map things out as a flow chart, containing all possibilities I can think of; If Action A is blocked by Obstacle 5, then turn to Action B; that sort of thing. It seems to me that your situation has so many unknowns and is so great in distance that you need as many options as possible. That you have only a week to prepare makes things more difficult.

    Given the distance involved, I’d say that any regional or short term crisis isn’t going to be a significant factor as you should be able to get close to home fairly soon in, for example, a hurricane or local grid down situation. It’s more likely to me that the real problem you might have to deal with could be a long term or nationwide crisis which would rob you of the normal infrastructure that would ordinarily get you home. Therefore I think you should plan for that more than a small crisis.

    My suggestions are expensive and may not be options for you, but I put them up anyway in case there’s something useful amongst them.

    Can you fly a plane, and navigate? If you can your situation suggests that a small plane and a cargo of fuel might be your best option.

    Failing that, a large vehicle in which you can store a huge amount of fuel [which you would have to buy in advance and keep in rotation so it isn’t around long enough to go ‘bad’], as well as camping equipment, water, and anything else you can carry for a journey that could take you weeks or longer. I’d favor a proper truck for the cargo capacity, and have a friend go a mile or two ahead on a motorcycle as your scout who can radio back any problems ahead.

    If you can afford it, and you trust your friends who live along the way, pay them to have a resupply stop waiting for you, because you might need that.

    Obtain highly detailed maps of everywhere you might go or be diverted to, as info about back roads and little known lanes and the terrain might get you through and around blockages.

    Carry lots of small bill cash; if the currency is still accepted but credit cards are out you will be in a better position.

    You could consider setting up your family to make an escape from Florida on their own if you can’t get back there in time.

    That’s all I can think of for now.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #23582
    Profile photo of Amanda11
    Amanda11
    Survivalist
    member3

    Hello Pheonix,

    I read through the responses, and I think everyone assumes you are driving there and back (or are you flying?). Your initial question and the thread of conversation are definitely interesting; I’ve wondered about that as well.

    #23583
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Phoenix, it’s good you’re prepping/thinking now about SHTF and travel irregardless of what you end up doing. May help in situations that are unforeseen in the future. If not already have battery operated emergency radio that you can monitor emergency services communications. If you have a smartphone (& it works in SHTF) there are emergency/disaster services apps that can help stay informed of what’s happening — Examples:

    http://www.grabpak.com/the-ultimate-smartphone-disaster-preparedness-app-list/

    http://www.ubalert.com/

    http://www.redcross.org/prepare/mobile-apps

    http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2012/10/29/apps-to-get-through-natural-disaster/

    My wife and I are staying on Kodiak Island this week and next and I share your concern but don’t worry because, as you’re doing, I’ve taken a handful of precautions….alternate maritime transportation, friend is bush pilot, good kit etc. Also big fan of satellite phones and we and family members back home have them. Perhaps, if budget allows, check into it.

    http://www.outfittersatellite.com/blog/globalstar-satellite-phone/satellite-phone-providers.html

    Other than communications — wilderness first aid is good training and definitely firearms training if you do not have already. Selco’s SHTF School online course is helpful. Work on developing that mindset.

    Godspeed,
    Chester
    PS North Dakota can have serious weather conditions. Get to know ins-and-outs of the climate you’re in.

    #23586
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I was not trying to sound like a buzz kill. We as preppers prepare for the worst and hope for the best. Worst case is Pheonix would have to walk the whole way. There are so many variables just in SHTF circumstances alone that it would be impossible to prepare for every one of them and be able to hike home with the gear. I find myself hundreds of miles from home on a regular basis due to work. The terrain that lies between where I am and home is no walk in the park. I have family members/ friends in place that will make sure my immediate family gets to our BOL in the event that I am not home when SHTF. I will meet them at the BOL as soon as I can. As I stated above I do not know Pheonix’s preps or if they plan on bugging in. Those factors play in to how long Pheonix has to get home before his family has to leave. For the distance being discussed ways of procuring additional supplies will be just important than the supplies carried. If you are hiking you will run out of your carried food before you get home. Same with water. I would recommend a small light .22, some snare making materials as well as a slingshot. Water containers, multiple means of water purification and fire building tools will be a must as well. A good knife will not be optional. A 10’x10′ piece of plastic or tarp would go a long way in keeping you dry and out of the elements. A compass. I carry a light weight net type hammock in my bag as well. It’s a place to sleep off the ground, can be used as a net or used as a bag to carry things. Hopefully you will be able to drive the whole way there and won’t need all this stuff but it is a place to start if you can’t.

    #23588
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Phoenix,

    Some good advice here. I would like to lend my own viewpoint to the matter…

    You’re thinking about it all wrong. You’re thinking “Well, if my car/truck dies, then we’re back to using shank’s mare (hoofing it on foot).” Wrong.

    Let me relate an anecdote that was told to me by a SF Master Sergeant a very long time ago..

    There’s two groups of soldiers drinking in a bar. One is comprised of Rangers from 2/75th and the other is comprised of SF troops from 1/10th.

    An orderly runs in and says “There’s going to be a war tomorrow in (insert distant city)! You all have to be there by tomorrow!”

    The Rangers put down their beers, ruck up and start humping it to (insert distant city).

    The SF guys have several more rounds of beers. Then they steal a car, put their gear in it and drive to (insert distant city).

    The point of all this is mindset.

    Yeah, you can hump it the whole way – all 2000+ miles of it (by the way, your boots won’t hold up if you try that). Or, if it’s SHTF, you and yours can steal (“appropriate”… “liberate”… whatever euphemism you want to use) a suitable car or truck and drive there. If it breaks or you blow a tire and there’s no spare, then steal another one. Point is, when SHTF, all the rules go out the nearest handy window. Why should YOU play by a set of rules that does not apply anymore? Yeah, yeah, I know because morality, law and order, etc, etc… but if I were staring down the barrel of having to hump all my stuff 2000+ miles? Yep… stealing a car or truck becomes my first priority. No gas? Steal a diesel and make fuel from old cooking oil, lye and octane booster… yeah, it will clog the filter and/or make the truck run like shyte, but so what? It’s SHTF and there will be stuff laying around for the taking… even stealing a bike would be better than humping all that crap 2000+ miles…

    Carry a funnel, a bucket, a hammer and a screwdriver with you… you don’t need to syphon fuel from old cars. Just get under it, put the bucket under the fuel tank and knock a hole in it with the screwdriver and hammer… owner’s probably joined the Choir Invisible anyways, so the fuel is just gonna sit there and go bad…

    Will you run the risk of getting shot? Yep. But in a SHTF situation, you’re gonna run the risk of getting shot anyways… often for any reason, or no reason… might as well make risking your life worth it.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #23686
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Phoenix, have you ever been in North Dakota in the winter?

    As one who has lived and travelled across the area you would be trying to get home through, let me give one very serious piece of advice.
    Plan to hole up.

    The northern plains, mountains and midwest kill people every year.
    Winter here is nothing to toy with. 4 (5?) years ago, in eastern Colorado we went from 60f to -30 in two days. And it stayed in the negative numbers for over a month.

    Travel in that weather is laughable, I’m sorry but there’s a lot of inhospitable country you are looking at, regardless of the weather.

    Now lets consider logistics.
    Assuming you had a king cab pickup, diesel fueled with a full 28 gallon tank, and a hundred gallon tank in the bed of the truck, and got 20mpg, you could cruise in on fumes. Thats assuming the roads were clear and you didn’t have to detour to cross the Missouri and Mississippi rivers anywhere. What are the chances of clear roads in a crisis?

    Okay enough on all that.

    Gear to get out with:
    .308 rifle with .32acp adapter. With a couple of boxes of each ammo you are set for any game you run across on the ground.
    Wiggys sleeping bag system.
    Knife and hatchet.
    Heavy duty canvas tarps.
    Cook pot.
    Canteens (plural)
    550cord.
    Boots and heavy socks.
    Cold weather gear.

    The list is endless but these are the first musts on that list.

    Sorry, 2200 miles is a long way to go.
    Look at the pioneers and the covered wagons. Look at the times and routes they travelled. There is a reason for the times and routes.
    There are places you couldn’t pay me to cross on foot, even on horseback its sketchy. And you’re gonna be in the thick of it.

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