Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 101 total)
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  • #39154
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I have posted this before on this trend. I live in the city so this year I have started growing in pots. Potatoes, Tomatoes, Lettuce and so on. You can bring then in at night and out in the day time when you can watch them. No other way.
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    #39155
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Looks great Freedom

    #39156
    Profile photo of johnredcliff
    johnredcliff
    Survivalist
    member1

    Thanks for the ideas. So if you have them in containers are they very heavy? Do you carry them by hand, or with a two-wheeler or something like that? I wonder if anyone has figured out how much you would need to reap in order to be supplied from your efforts?

    This actually reminded me of being in Portuguese areas for work about 15 years ago doing deliveries. They were living in the heart of the city, but most of them had a little garden plot and a couple of chickens now that I think of it. I had forgotten about it til just now. Wasn’t thinking of this kind of thing back then.

    #39160
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    johnredcliff, Some you can carry but others that are heavy you can buy the round wheeler for round pots to be able to bring them in.

    This is the first year my garden is all in pots. It was a test run to see how it would work. Well the tomatoes have been much better then all the ten years I have been doing this. I also have an area in the second floor of the house which I am planning to grow there next year. Second floor will be harder to see the plants.

    #39176
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    If you use pots there are factors to consider.
    They dry out faster then plants in the ground so more watering time is required, (unless you use an automated system like the rain gutter type posted here in the past)
    If you move the plants indoors for protection daily in the morning and again in the evening will use both time and energy that you might need for other purposes.
    Moving them in and out could attract unwanted attention.
    Damage to the plants is more likely then stationary plantings.
    A large storage space will be required doubling the space needed for plants.

    #39337
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    74, In the cities there is no other way because in a SHTF time they will go after all foods. After the first six months if you are still alive then outside growing is the way to go.

    Well here is an update on my garden test. The Cherry tomatoes have been great, I have picked over 1,000 and the trees have another 1,000 more. I am using them every time I cook. The large tomatoes have had some bugs but I have picked over 50 and thing I will have another 50 more.

    The Lettuce was great for three months now. I have two pots left but it is starting to get to hot for anymore so these are the last Lettuce for the year.

    I have many papayas and pineapples growing now. The great thing about pineapples is you don’t have to do much to them just watch them grow the same goes for papayas.

    The growing in pots is only for anyone that is living in the cities. Also this doesn’t guarantee that someone will see them in the daytime but if you are guarding them in the daytime then they will come at night to find that the plants are not outside.

    Many in a SHTF will only take food when there is no danger but will not attack since they know that they may get shot.

    #41056
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Spring came late this year, but then it was warmer than normal allowing plants to start catching up, trees leafed out these past few days, the apple trees bloomed yesterday,…..and we had a frost last night. The high-low thermometer in the greenhouse said it got down to 33 inside but the thermometer is on an inside wall so it is possible to have gotten lower around the outside walls. I’ll know soon enough if any of the seedlings froze. Same with the fruiting shrubs outside that had all leafed out and or bloomed these past few days and the rhubarb I was planning to start harvesting. I won’t know for at least a month about the apples though. Either little apples will start forming or they won’t. My young pear trees bloomed too and I was hoping maybe I’d get my first pears from them this year. We’ll see. This could be the last frost of the season, or not. Will get into the 30’s again tonight and then warm up again. Clear windless nights like last night allow the coldest air to settle in the valleys such as I live in. Can’t do anything about it.

    #41248
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good thing I didn’t listen to myself and plant the veggie garden. The night following my “last frost” had another frost, and then this past Friday night we had an even colder night. I covered over the plants most susceptible to the cold but it wasn’t enough for my newly planted seedless grapes. The sheet they were covered with kept the actual frost off them but the cold permeated the sheet anyway and froze the leaves. About half of each plant died. I suspect they’ll live but now they’ll put their energy into trying to regenerate what the cold damaged rather than really growing. My mulberry tree had just started budding out and all of the buds were killed. I had just planted it last year and was pleased it had made it through the winter. It too will now put its energy into regenerating rather than growing. I’m sure we’re done for the season at this point and will put in the veggie garden this week. Its all rototilled and ready to go. Odd year. An endlessly cold and unending winter followed by a warmer than normal spring, but with late frosts anyway. If the pundits are right and we’re in the early part of a 30 year cold spell, gardening will be a challenge. We’ve had two endlessly cold and unending winters in a row, last summer was cooler than normal, and the forecast is for this summer to be cooler than normal. All of that is manageable so long as we don’t get summer frosts. I don’t think there is much risk of that happening though. We just need 3 frost free months (June – August) a year to grow what needs growing.

    The good news is it looks like my apple trees weren’t damaged by the frosts. I think it’ll be a bumper year for apples.

    #41249
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB, I was thinking about you when I saw the weather map and everywhere north of here was going below freezing. It’s been cool here and slowed down the flower gardens noticeably. My biggist issue is the lack of rain. We’ve had one short thunder shower in the last month for about .5″ of rain. Average rainfall is 3.5″ per month. I planted seed in the vegetable garden 3 weeks ago and hardly anything is germinating. The soil is like dust unless I water, and the lawn is yellowing an looks like we’re at the end of August.

    #41253
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    It’s been dry here too. The little seasonal stream that feeds my pond is down to a small trickle and will stop altogether within a couple days if it doesn’t rain. Normally that stream goes dry in August and then comes back in Sept.

    #41319
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I have a lot of plants coming up now that I started to water. It still hasn’t rained this month so I’m going to keep it up until harvest time. White and red potates both spouted, sweet corn, beans, peas, pumpkins, watermelons, squash and some other suff that I cant recall at the moment. Now I have to finish the fence.

    I’m wondering how much seed other people have stored? It’s my next important prep.

    #41323
    Profile photo of johnredcliff
    johnredcliff
    Survivalist
    member1

    Haven’t looked back on this thread for a little while.

    I had the same problem with apparent frost damage one day. I had one raised bed with kind of a rim or border to it. The plants all died down to the rim more or less. I am not sure if they will be a loss. I had another experimental bed that I put black mulch around. That one seemed to do well, even though it was lower.

    We have the same problem in New England- the ground is bone dry. I have been watering every day.

    #41333
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I just finished putting in my garden a couple hours a go and the 1st rain in quite a while should start in about half an hour, just a quick thunderstorm but it will help. My yard has started browning out which I can’t recall ever happening in May.

    74, I have set aside a lot of seeds in my basement. It doesn’t get above 60 down there in the summer and drops to maybe 45 in the winter so hopefully the cool temps will help preserve them.

    #41346
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    This part of North Texas was, was that is, in sever drought. That all changed this month. As of this month we have surpassed the total for all of last year. Last year total was 31.67 inches and now this year we are already at 35 inches! 20 inches this month only!
    If I had anything planted it would have washed away. I have not seen my yard dry in over 2 months!
    Robin

    #41359
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Late yesterday afternoon/early evening we got two waves of thunderstorms come through which gave quite a drenching. More rain is expected on Saturday so our mini-drought seems to have ended, though the rainfall total will still be down for the year thus far. At least I won’t have to water the garden for a while.

    The floods in TX are a reminder that people should always look at the flood potential when they decide where to live. In the event a time comes when there isn’t any disaster relief, recovering from floods could prove impossible. It isn’t that hard to determine if a location is subject to flooding. First and foremost, any place that has flooded in the past will flood again someday. Maybe it’ll be this year, maybe it won’t be for another hundred years, but it will happen again. Beyond that, study a topographic map. It is not that hard to see where the water will flow should a dam break. It is also not that hard to see where the topography narrows so as to cause water upstream to back up during flood conditions, or if a given area could have a bowl effect where flood waters will accumulate. I have always studied the flood potential before buying properties and did the same with my son when he was looking at houses. I became flood-aware the year I graduated high school and the place my Dad worked at was badly flooded out.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 101 total)

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