Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 101 total)
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  • #35829
    Profile photo of carpedebass
    carpedebass
    Survivalist
    member3

    Good to know, 74. Thanks!

    #35830
    Profile photo of carpedebass
    carpedebass
    Survivalist
    member3

    Thanks for the info Mountain Biker. Some of the rocks do cause the tiller to lurch. I try to remove those as soon as I come across them.

    #35833
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    If you are located in a hot climate your grandfather may have added rocks on the bottom of some of that part of the garden. You moving it around may have pulled them up. Just thinking this is done for some plants. Not sure if the rocks were all under the soil before you started.

    #35834
    Profile photo of carpedebass
    carpedebass
    Survivalist
    member3

    Really Freedom? I didn’t even know that someone would add rocks for moisture control. Makes a certain amount of sense though. But the area is very rocky naturally, so I don’t think he’d have had to add them. I am in a hot climate. Central Texas can be very hot and dry. I’m thinking I may be messing up by removing the rocks.

    #35835
    Profile photo of carpedebass
    carpedebass
    Survivalist
    member3

    I’m looking at a product now called “Semaspore” that is supposed to be good at controlling grasshoppers and is considered organic. Anyone ever use it for grasshopper control? I’m also seriously considering putting in a chicken coop but using guineas rather than chickens. Pest control and eggs to boot!

    #35838
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I am not sure about the product since we do not have many grasshoppers here in South Florida.

    About the rocks if added I am not sure about moisture control since rocks do not hold on to moisture.

    #35839
    Profile photo of carpedebass
    carpedebass
    Survivalist
    member3

    Oh, Freedom I misread your post.

    #35840
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Rocks, gravel and sand make the soil more porous and aid drainage in clay or other poor draining soils.

    Humus, organic material like peat and composted strawn, hay or leaves will act like a sponge.

    BTW carpedebass, I’m doubtful if a traditional style electric fence will stop wildlife. Maybe you have something else in mind?

    #35842
    Profile photo of carpedebass
    carpedebass
    Survivalist
    member3

    I don’t know 74. As I stated, I have no clue what I’m doing in terms of gardening. I’m sure that is painfully obvious to all by now. I know deer will jump a fence that isn’t 8 feet tall, but rabbits may be stopped if it’s low enough? Also cattle will have to be kept out of it.

    #35845
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Well it will be a good experience anyway. One theory is to grow enough for everyone including the pests.

    Keep the egglayers out of the garden untill it has grow up a bit, they love small green shoots.

    #35846
    Profile photo of carpedebass
    carpedebass
    Survivalist
    member3

    74, will do! Hopefully this garden will be large enough that I can share a little bit with the bugs and critters and have plenty left over. That is if I can actually get anything to grow. I don’t exactly have a green thumb. This is a bit overwhelming for me to be honest. But I figure there’s no better way to learn than just jump in there and make some mistakes.

    #35847
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    deer can jump an 8 foot fence unless you wire string with ribbons the top using any terrain change near the fence to get in we use a 12 foot fence 2 feet into the ground and ten feet up around garden and animal barns. we use chain link. depending on size of fencing job you can get it cheap from china if in bulk.. remember to cement all poles in and use good quality galvanizing.

    the fencing rolls are very heavy so doing this manually is unusually hard would suggest renting a tractor with a fencing spool. and an auger to dig the holes. if your soil drains or is dry enough do all the holes first. then cement the poles once done then put up fencing.

    you can also find it at military surplus sales locally

    then again i live in wild territory where we are in their space not them in ours.

    #35848
    Profile photo of carpedebass
    carpedebass
    Survivalist
    member3

    Namelus, thanks for the info.

    #35858
    Profile photo of Ron S
    Ron S
    Survivalist
    member6

    carpedebass, you have received some excellant advice from many sources and I agree with them all. I will also advise you to look into companion planting. Some bugs that are attracted to certain plants will not go near them if you have planted certain other plants near them or even encircling the rows or the entire garden. Planting certain flowers adjacent to your tomatoes will not only repel some bugs but will also cause some of the bad guys to think you just have a pretty flower garden, as they drive by your location they will see the flowers and ignore the fact that there are vegetables there too. Tilling your compost into the soil is a great idea. You might also consider putting grass clippings throughout your garden or you can also use straw. Using either on your garden will keep down the weeds as well as retaining the moisture. Also, because you are not walking in there all the time to weed your plants, you willf ind that it will be easier to till when you are ready to till again I knoow from experince that if one covers the ground around potatoe plants they can be harvested just using your fingers( no digging required). I just brush the clippings back, dig into the soil with my fingers to expose a potatoe to see if it was large enough to use and pick it if it was. If not big enough, then I just covered it back up to let it grow some more. This is not an original idea with me as I read about it in ORGANIC GARDENING MAGAZINE about 40 years ago. My experience was that my potatoes, tomatoes, purple beans, yellow beans, lima beans and my okra all did well. And my peppers also liked it too.
    You might also look at stringing string over your garden to discourage the birds as they will fear getting their wings entangled . I also have heard that putting blood around your garden will keep away the rabbits. I tried that one year and it seemed to work but it will wash off and has to be replenished after you water or it rains. I used blood meal but there are probably some other ideas out there.

    #35860
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    carpedebass, “Oh, Freedom I misread your post. ” No problem, this happens all the time when we are writing a post, we ether misread or we write the word which may not mean what we really what to say.

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