Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #12607
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I thought this might be a good topic to share insight with less experienced guests of this site. Do you remember the first time you tried to clean game? LOL I sure do. What a mess. I will start off with a tip on skinning wild hogs. Hog hide is very tough and usually caked with mud, neither of which are friendly to the sharp edge on your knife. The hide is also very well atteched to the meat.

    The best thing I have found to skin hogs with is a utility/razor knife with a hooked roofing blade. Blades are cheap, sharp and you won’t get into the guts with it. Hang the hog from the hind legs with a spreader bar if you have one or use a strong piece metal pipe and tie the legs to it just below the hocks(their version of elbows) and hoist the hindquarters to about head level. Cut a ring around all 4 legs at the elbow joint. Be careful not to cut the hamstring tendon in the hind legs as it will make it difficult to keep the hog hoisted up if you do. Now cut the skin from one hindquarter elbow joint down between the legs and up to the other hindquarter elbow joint. Next with the belly of the hog facing you make a cut down the ridge of the hindquarter, down the side of the belly, and all the way down the back of the front leg to it’s elbow joint.

    Repeat this step on the other side. Next cut the skin from between the legs around the anus and tail. Depending on how big the hog is the next cut can be repeated as needed. With the hogs back facing you make a cut from the center of the hindquarter down the sides all the way past the front shoulder. You should now have a hide divided into 4 strips, a belly strip, 2 side strips and a back strip. Use your regular knife to star seperating the top of the strips from the meat. Once you have them started you can use your hands and peel the pig like a bannana. It is much easier to remove the hide in strips instead of all in one piece.

    #12608
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Here is a ruff sketch for reference

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    #12614
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Same as a goat!

    #12636
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    one faster  way keep  when tied securely to tree  and you get a  roll of skins as big as news paper  connect a vehicle tow cable and  drive off slowly peeling hide from body make sure to have a tarp under it  for when hide rips free if not a tall tree so body swings not touching ground. WAY WAY faster to do

     

     

     

    #12641
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    namelus, agree that is the way we have done the goats.

    #12654
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I have heard of that but never tried it. Hmmm guess I’m gonna have to now.

    #12656
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    matt76 Yes you do the cuts the same way but you tie to the tree and pull the hide off. My father has been doing it that way since he was 17 and he is 84 now.

    #12659
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Another good tip on skinning squirrels. Cut the skin width wise across the back. Work index finger from both hands under the skin. One pointing up the spine the other down the spine. Once you are far enough in to get a grip pull both hands in opposite directions. The skin will tear around the mid section and pull off like a sock from both ends. With practice you can skin a squirrel in about 10 seconds.

    #12674
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    I thought this might be a good topic to share insight with less experienced guests of this site. Do you remember the first time you tried to clean game? LOL I sure do. What a mess.

    It is definitely good topic, one of those that I want to read more about. Thanks for starting and sharing Matt.

    #12689
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Matt – just curious what do you do with the wild hog skin? Last fall when we slaughtered a hog we used this recipe to make Henderson’s pork scratchings. I was not a huge fan. But I was thinking a wild hog skin might be tougher/thicker probably if it’s older?

    #12690
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tweva,

    Are scatchings the same as scrapple?

    #12695
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Tweva,
    Wild hog skin is indeed very tough. It could be tanned and used for something designed for high abrasion. Wild hogs generally have a lot of parasites like ticks, lice or fleas on their skin. I don’t think I would try to make a food item out of it.
    Some Native American groups would use the thick shoulder section of a large boar hide for a shield. The thick gristley layer of skin was like concrete when dried, great for stopping arrows and even some light black powder rounds.

    There was a Mexican family that lived behind us when I was young that made pork rinds from pig skin. These were domestic pigs not wild. They would take a large metal tub and build a fire under it. They would use 5 gallons of peanut oil, a gallon of orange juice and some other seasonings and fry the meat and skin in it after it haf been cut up in small strips. It was really good.

    #12782
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    1974 – no they are something like the homemade version of pork rinds – thicker usually. I got Chef Fergus Henderson’s books ‘The Whole Beast’ and ‘Beyond Nose to Tail’ cookbooks for Christmas and we used his recipe for the skin:

    #12783
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Thanks Matt! Very good to know!

    #12795
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    tweva, When I cook my pig I marinade it the night before with sour oranges, garlic, and some salt. I cook the pig about 6 to 7 hours, high needs to be three concrete blocks high or 24″ high on it’s ribs side. The fire needs to be on the two ends, no fire in the center and keep the fire at a mid heat, no flames.

    Now comes the very important part. After the 6 to 7 hours that you see it is done now you take the pig out of the fire and lower the concrete blocks to only one or 8″ off the fire. Now you get the pig and brush cooking wine with salt all over the skin on the pig and put the pig on the skin side back to the fire, make sure to move the fire all over, no more to the two side like it was before but all over the bottom of the pit. Leave it for about 5 to 10 minutes. You need to keep an eye on it now to see the skin fry up. It will taste great.

    I think this will work for the wild hogs too.

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