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  • #7911
    Ghost
    Ghost
    Survivalist
    member3

    Just wanted to share some thoughts on the subject of foraging as it’s been mentioned in a couple of threads here, which coincides with a comment someone made on another forum regarding Chris Mccandless.

    If you have the chance to take a foraging class I’d recommend doing so, just collecting a couple of books on the subject and waiting until TSHTF is a bad idea. Even without a foraging class you can teach yourself but you need to be doing so now while you have the sources to cross check and confirm, never eat something unless you’re 100% sure what it is, if in doubt chuck it out.

    Some wild foods are an aquired taste and some just taste bloody aweful, again waiting for TSHTF might prove a bit of a shock to your taste buds.

    There are several easily recognisable foods, Nettle’s, Thistles, Gorse, Ribwort & Broadleaf Plantain, Hawthorn (Leaves, Haw buds and Flowers) and Dandelion are all common in both rural and urban area’s and in my opinion a good solid starting point for gathering, preparing/ cooking and getting a tatse for wild foods.

    Just some of my thoughts, opinions vary,

    If at first you don't succeed, excessive force is usually the answer.

    #7931
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    I agree and learn how to prepare them now so can actually eat them.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #7933
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    This time of year (or soon) there is wild asparagus. If you walk along the shoulder of rural roads you can find it. Late summer the plant is in it’s mature state and is easy to recognize even driving in the car. Because it is a perennial you can mark it on a map and go back in the spring to cut it in season.

    If you have a topographical map of your area you can mark all of your findings and other important info for later use.

    #7940
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I need to take a class on foraging, this is an area that I am missing, do not know enough.

    #7994
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thanks Ghost!
    I definitely don’t know enough about foraging. A class would be great.

    #8008
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Euell Gibbons literally wrote the books on foraging.

    Christopher Nyerges has a couple of good books and does a good class.

    #10423
    Profile photo of OldAccounts
    OldAccounts
    Survivalist

    removed

    #10427
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Paddle,
    You are so lucky in that regard. As you say in the US Northeast the number of plants edible plants are fewer and finding them is more time consuming. After the leaves fall off determining what plant you are looking at becomes more difficult and the choices are diminished.

    #10430
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I am still studying all the wild edible plants that are in the South Florida area, there are many here.

    I also grow a lot of fruit trees here.

    #10581
    Profile photo of OldAccounts
    OldAccounts
    Survivalist

    removed

    #10665
    Ghost
    Ghost
    Survivalist
    member3

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Paddle Asia wrote:</div>
    I made a video a while ago of me and Ms. Moo (girlfriend) walking around in our yard full of edible stuff, most of which is available in the jungle. There are a few more things in my yard that are edible that I didn’t talk about. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4GxeRB0Meg

    I enjoyed that Vid thanks Paddle, the dogs adorable I lol’d when Ms Moo ate the sour fruit (sorry) I looked up Pak Tam Leung because it looked so much like Ivy (which I believe is inedible) but googling Pak Tam Leung didn’t yield anything.

    If at first you don't succeed, excessive force is usually the answer.

    #10729
    Profile photo of OldAccounts
    OldAccounts
    Survivalist

    Removed

    #10731
    Profile photo of OldAccounts
    OldAccounts
    Survivalist

    removed

    #11947
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10
    #12021
    Ghost
    Ghost
    Survivalist
    member3

    Thanks Whirlibird interesting read.

    If at first you don't succeed, excessive force is usually the answer.

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