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  • #51780
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    As survivalists and preppers we all know that one can make pine needle tea, but few know just how bad it tastes. Same for “Brigham bush” (needs sugar!!!).

    But start looking around your area right now. What is edible, what tastes good?
    Wild strawberries, raspberry, gooseberry, all easy to find and identify. Growing up, there were a dozen mulberry trees just down the street.

    Morel mushrooms, aka po’boy crack, are around in some strange places, but always taste great. Helpful hint, use a mesh bag when collecting, that way you are spreading the spores around so you get more. Everyone wants to use plastic nowadays but there’s a corresponding reason why the morel patches are dwindling.

    Right now there are countless books and websites that tell what is edible. All too often it’s survival oriented. Sure you can eat the “X” layer of tree bark, but is that something you want to feed your family?
    You may pay $10 for a fresh greens salad which includes dandelion leaves, (Get em young) watercress, and more.

    Out in our front yard there’s a crabapple tree, another in the neighbors. I really need to start crabapple jelly this year.

    Behind the building at work, half a dozen apple trees.

    Time for a change, back to basics.

    #51781
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    If you have space for them, plant some fruit trees now given it’ll take a while before they yield much. Incorporate edible plants into your landscaping. For example use strawberries in lieu of traditional ground covers. Via runners they’ll quickly fill in as much space as you allow them. Plant a few blueberry bushes as decorative shrubs. Use rugusa rose plants as a fence. They’ll be very fragrant with brilliant flowers and make for an all but impenetrable fence. Their thorns will rip your skin off and they are extremely hardy too. At my last house I used to cut mine down to the ground every few years when they started to get ratty looking and within a few months I had full sized bushes again. Stop using weed killers on your lawn being the dandelions, plaintains, and perhaps other weeds are edible. Once the lawn is mowed if it is green the lawn still looks decent. Daylillies are edible and will spread as much as you allow them and make for a nice part of the landscape.

    #51784
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Nice thread, WB & MB. It reminded me of what I just ran across the other night – an old resource that was “hiding” on my hard drive that I’d totally forgotten about. Now that I “found” it, I don’t even remember having had it originally to download. It’s actually a link contained in another reference I did obtain back in 1995, somehow (according to the file dates on two files). And the resulting web site (listed in one of the files from 1995) is a wonderful find.

    Plants can be exceptionally useful, and much is available about them – if one knows where to look. I’ve got a whole new area to re-start learning. Years ago we were beginning to get just a little competent in using herbs for fairly basic treatment, but got sidetracked when we came upon homeopathy. As impressive as that field is (despite the naysayers), it’s far more complex than what individuals can master themselves. Unlike homeopathy, I’m relatively convinced that having some excellent resources on herbs, and getting to know what’s available right around us, could become highly valuable and much easier to learn than homeopathy – both for food (as both WB and MB pointed out) as well as healing. So, if this is of significant “keeper” and reference value, great! If not, nothing lost:

    http://www.swsbm.com/HOMEPAGE/HomePage.html

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #51786
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Suntheanine with caffeine and ginseng generally …. Green tea leaves. A lot of herbs can used in tea. Ephedra sinica, banned but available on the net. Good for congestion. Cinnamon mixed with alcohol – hot damn cinnamon.

    #51798
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Whirlibird, don’t overlook the use of crabapples to make pectin, to jell other fruits. My sister used to boil and mash a potful of crabapples, strain the juice and can it. Then to make jelly of other fruits and berries, she added the crabapple pectin to make it firm.

    I agree with Mountain Biker as to planting edible landscaping. We only have a tiny lot (.2 of an acre) but everything I plant is edible. No poisonous stuff (iris etc even though beautiful is poisonous to eat.) Pansies, daylilies, violets, etc.

    Don’t laugh but I planted a row of lamb’s quarters in our little veggie garden as an experiment. They taste great, like a good spinach, although the leaves are small so it takes a long time to pick (snip ‘em with a scissors). While as weeds, most grow a foot or two high, along the roads and in waste areas, my plants grew over 8 feet tall, huge bushes, in good garden soil. And the seeds are reportedly edible also but haven’t tried them yet.

    A word of caution: Henbit (which constitutes most of our yard LOL) is supposed to be edible as well. But it is also a stimulant and did not make me feel well after eating a bowlful. Make sure you are compatible with the stuff you forage BEFORE things go down.

    I have a large stock tank garden against the house, filled with different herb plants. Good for cooking, and for some medicinal use as well. But I am not one to rely on herbs for serious conditions. Stock up on medx and antibiotics too…

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    #51800
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Just ran across this site: “Edible Weeds”

    http://www.ediblewildfood.com/

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #51803
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    We planted a small orchard a few years ago, as you all might remember me saying.

    Depending on the age of the sapling you plant and the type of tree, it could take years for them to mature enough to start producing fruit and nuts.

    Some fruit trees are self-pollinating. Some are not. You need to know which is which. Good rule of thumb is that if you are going to plant a fruit or nut tree, then plant another near it. The birds and insects will cross-pollinate the trees and your yield will be much greater, even with “self pollinating” trees.

    The nut trees we planted – walnuts, almonds – will not be producing anything for awhile. Too young. But, there are black walnut trees growing nearby. The meat inside is good and most times they are there for the taking – if a land owner even cares, they’ll be more than happy to let you take all the walnuts you want. As I said, the meat inside is edible and the shells can be ground down and made into a brown clothing dye or a stain. They can also be ground fine and used to polish spent cartridge brass for reloading.

    Easy way to get to the nuts inside when you harvest them is to spread them out on your driveway and literally roll over them with your car. The walnut shell inside won’t break, but the outside bit will come off.

    Almonds are a super food. They are calorie and fat dense – 12 almonds have about 100 calories and 10g of fat. Also contain magnesium, Vitamin E, antioxidants, etc, help fight diabetes and heart disease.

    We currently have 3 almond trees in our orchard. The tree and bug lady from the county extension was surprised to see almond trees growing so well – it’s a tree you do not normally see here. We have the All-In-One Almond tree and Hall’s Hardy Almond trees. The All-In-One is a good general tree, but the Hall’s is more cold-hardy (meaning during normal seasonal changes, both types will produce nuts. But if there is a particularly cold winter and something bad happens, the Hall’s will still produce)…

    Within sight of me right now is a willow tree. While not as common as they are farther south, they are planted as an ornamental. There is another about a mile from here. I take notice of these things. The willow bark can be made into an “aspirin” tea (actual aspirin was synthesized from the bark of the willow), and it works, but it tastes nasty.

    Willow – when rendered into charcoal – is also the best wood to use if you are making Black Powder (willow charcoal + sulpher + Potassium nitrate), but I think Willow is more valuable around here as a medicinal than a source for charcoal. Plenty of other hardwoods can be used for satisfactory gunpowder. Leave the Willow for medicinal use.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #51806
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Our squirrels collect the black walnuts from our trees and hide them. One time I had a wood pile which had been sitting for awhile. When I finally stacked it I uncovered a cache of walnuts. I just left them and sure enough the squirrels came and took them away. We have apple trees but that means we have lots of deer friends. Every night the come like the shadows. If we could chip them and track them on a screen they would make a great alarm system. A running deer is a deer that’s been frightened by something or someone. We used to have duck but an owl came and killed them. This farming thing is you vs. the animals, the birds, the bugs, the weather. Nature is our enemy, the grocery store/farmers market is our friend. Lol

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 3 weeks ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    #51808
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Our squirrels collect the black walnuts from our trees and hide them. One time I had a wood pile which had been sitting for awhile. When I finally stacked it I uncovered a cache of walnuts. I just left them and sure enough the squirrels came and took them away. We have apple trees but that means we have lots of deer friends. Every night the come like the shadows. If we could chip them and track them on a screen they would make a great alarm system. A running deer is a deer that’s been frightened by something or someone. We used to have duck but an owl came and killed them. This farming thing is you vs. the animals, the birds, the bugs, the weather. Nature is our enemy, the grocery store/farmers market is our friend. Lol

    LMAO! “You vs the animals, the birds, the bugs, the weather…”

    From your mouth to God’s ear. Sometimes, I get so frustrated I’m like “I WILL WIPE OUT EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM CRITTERS I CAN FIND ANY WAY I CAN! I DON’T GIVE A S*** IF IT’S EVEN AGAINST THE GENEVA CONVENTION!”

    But, I don’t really mean it… it’s just frustration. Usually I find a way that is, ah… “less destructive” than what I first thought of…

    Our plum trees are *about* ready to start cranking out plums… and I heard through the coconut telegraph that bears LOVE plums. They will pass up acres of apple trees to get at one plum tree… and destroy it in the process.

    If that is true… then there is a problem. I like bears. Well, I respect them as a fellow Apex Predator anyway. Bears are “No Touchy – Off Limits” for me. Unless it is coming right at us or something… But also I don’t want all our plum trees to be destroyed because Smokey wants a snack…

    Still working on the duck thing… trying to build an island for them to protect them from the raptors and coons, etc..

    Guess we will have to see how this plays out.

    Tomorrow: putting down Sevin to kill off the grubs and ticks, then tilling the garden…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #51809
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Bears and sharks have one thing in common to me , and that is , the only good one is a dead one , wolves also . Make the woods and waters safer , kill ‘em all . Some enviro , do – gooders , thought it was a good idea to try to re introduce wolves back into Northern Arizona . They were exterminated from that area for a reason . Ranchers and rural people dont want them around ! My guess is , they will be wiped out again , but the evidence will be buried , now that they are ” protected ” .

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