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  • #15383
    Profile photo of Tsar Alexander
    Tsar Alexander
    Survivalist
    member4

    I was looking at this lately

    http://www.nass.usda.gov/Charts_and_Maps/Crops_County/boundary_maps/indexgif.asp

    It has crossed my mind–what happens when the economy collapses, and the megafarms won’t be able to deliver food, if they can grow it in the first place without oil based products?

    I wonder how much local agriculture can handle? I somehow sense it will not be enough in most places. Does this mean there will be a mass die off (50%+ of the population) in America, or will somehow people find a way around this problem, and will local farms expand during and after a crisis to handle more food?

    Just some thoughts. Would love to hear everyone else’s opinion/experiences.

    #15386
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Tsar I can assure you local agriculture in most places will not be enough to fill the gap from megafarms and imported produce/food. Except for the independent and small farms located where there is water and sun and warmth most of the growing year, think about it; it takes time to ramp up and plant more (assuming you have land ready to cultivate), then you have to wait for it to grow…..hope like hell mother nature doesn’t take your crop for one reason or another. Most independent and small farms rely on tractors and machinery too. They gonna have diesel, spare parts? They gonna have/find enough seed?

    This is why it is important for you to learn to grow your own food – or as much of it as you can – based at first on the simplest diet that you will actually eat and still get the calories you will need. Hopefully these are easy to grow almost anywhere vegetables and fruits; and perhaps supplemented with whatever you can shoot/fish and eat. I wrote a post before on why I think people should begin now to simplify their diet.

    I grow much of my own food now. What I can’t grow easily are many grains or enough grains to keep me in flour etc., and to keep too many additional animals that can’t survive (and still have energy to work in the case of horses) without at least some grain. I am field trialing growing rice now – but even if it works out it would not be enough for me to base my year round diet on rice. Grains take a lot of space to produce the volume presently being consumed by the average American every year.

    #15388
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    I’m not optimistic in collapse scenario feeding those who can’t produce food. Particularly in the just-in-time supply chain that has evolved for the mass food markets.

    #15391
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    I compare this to the dustbowl years.

    While it was hard on people, most survived. They may have lost the farm, but they survived.

    Most people, most places can’t grow enough food for the summer months, let alone year round. Where I am, the growing season is a joke, the soil is rock and the deer/elk eat everything the mexicans don’t steal.

    Where I grew up, a different story altogether. Gardens grew like weeds, plenty of water, good soil, long growing season, one could relatively easily make a go of it. And they did during the bad years.

    Today its not just the climate, the location, but it is a laziness that is in every part of life. TV remotes, you don’t even have to get up to change the channel anymore, a true example of being lazy.
    Work in the yard? Thats why we hire people. Lazy!

    A couple of years back I called a citizen about a deer that had been hit by a car. He left it, it was too far from the road to drive over to so he didn’t have to carry it. How lazy do you have to be to not need free meat?

    #15395
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    All the great farmland in New Jersey (The Garden State) I knew as a child is now under expensive but shoddy cookie-cutter housing “developments”. The untillable land is what is left. Money-greed is currently more important than agriculture. When things go down, true priorities will suddenly become stark reality. I would hate to see the situation back there if it happened…

    #15402
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>wildartist wrote:</div>All the great farmland in New Jersey (The Garden State) I knew as a child is now under expensive but shoddy cookie-cutter housing “developments”. The untillable land is what is left. Money-greed is currently more important than agriculture. When things go down, true priorities will suddenly become stark reality. I would hate to see the situation back there if it happened…

    Nah, you’d do exactly what I’d do.
    Grab a bowl of popcorn and watch ‘em go at it.
    From a safe distance of course.

    #15427
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Money-greed is currently more important than agriculture.

    And this is exactly what will bite the average joe in the bottom. I think especially in colder climates where you have only one growing season, things will get really rough.

    In most cases in western countries those who worked the land with primitive tools have died already or are even multiple generations in the past. Most of the common knowledge from the past is now “weird” to know.

    Anyway, I think prepping and survival is a whole lifestyle and closely related to simple living. I do enjoy simple living so the prepping part is just an extension of this. Plus I like weapons, hiking, camping… so survival skills are right up my alley too.

    It’s great to see how many people here really enjoy the lifestyle. Getting back to the basics does not only make you more prepared it also connects you with some important values in life again. Even if the future would look great and perfect I wouldn’t do anything different.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #16957
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    In a collapse, yes many will starve because local agriculture at best might keep that local area going, but they’ll never be able to feed the suburban/urban areas. I think that lack of clean water & sanitation and lack of a modern medical infrastructure could well cause more deaths more quickly than actual starvation. That and violence, especially in urban areas. Summer heat in the south and lack of winter heat in the north would take a toll too.

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