Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 35 total)
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  • #15029
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    I ll try to present later whole process in separate post, with pics.
    Here s few videos of smoke houses for meat.

    (more “complicated” dryer)

    simple barrel style dryer

    It is slow process, with lot of recipes (everyone have his own, what type of meat, what type of wood, how long etc) Each recipe includes advice to drink a lot of home made booze while drying the stuff :)

    One more good source of food here (in rural ) is homemade fruit jam. Whole process is make without electricity, with old style wood “machines”, later that mass is boiled inside big pan over the open fire.

    In war that kind of jam (apple) was pretty valuable as a substitute for sugar. It can last 4-5 years in jars.

    #15030
    Profile photo of Hillbilly
    Hillbilly
    Survivalist
    member3

    So I use 55 gallon drums, steel with clamping ring tops. I think they are airtight. I bought mine for $12.00 each at a surplus store. The owner was making jokes because he bought 50 of them for $5.00ea. Just make sure there food grade and not old oil drums and they need to have removable lids. Just for the record, there not only mice proof but my friend has his in a barn and they are Bear proof too! I have discovered that with basics in mind, one drum holds enough beans and rice to last each person a year.
    Keep in mind that other drums with salt, sugar and coffee and other go alongs are necessary. I use a foodsaver vacuum packer for a lot too.
    Even the old dented up drums are good for things like toilet paper, as long as the lids fit and can be sealed your good to go.
    How much to store? I just keep going, I figure that family members will come to my place when things get dicey. I just keep going but I started a long time ago so now it’s all about rotation. I don’t think it’s a good idea to bury them as rust would win out in the long run.
    My father use to say ” your worth what you know son” so I have learned how to make liquor, beer,process meat and grow food. I just ordered tobacco seeds, plan on a lot of that, barterable production.
    Good luck all..

    #15058
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Selco wrote:</div>
    . In war that kind of jam (apple) was pretty valuable as a substitute for sugar. It can last 4-5 years in jars.

    That reminds me of Apple Butter they used to make back where I grew up at one of the museums (living history). Big iron pot slowly stewing for hours on end, the smell would draw people for miles.

    It never lasted years though, a jar may last days, maybe. Can enough and it might last through the winter, but I doubt it.

    #15102
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Survivalist
    member4

    Hillbilly, if you’re looking at growing baccy for trade (and I hope I’m not trying to teach my grandma to suck eggs here!) there’s a bit to the growing, picking and curing processes depending on your type of tobacco and what you want to make with it.
    You might like to visit the WLT forum; the guys (And a few gals) there will help you out.

    #15358
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    That reminds me of Apple Butter they used to make back where I grew up at one of the museums (living history). Big iron pot slowly stewing for hours on end, the smell would draw people for miles.

    One of the “advantages” of my BOL place is that people there are used to hard life, with very low income, so they are forced for decades to live on they own way.
    Old knowledge is still alive there, simply because they forced to live like that. So life without electricity and other benefits is nothing disastrous there. Old skills of producing food, hunting, and everything else is still in use.

    When SHTF it is not going to be paralyzing blow there.

    #15378
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Selco, the poorer countries and poorer areas will not have any problems. The countries that are advance technologies and depend on the internet for everything though are the counties that will see a lot of hunger, death, and maybe war.

    #15392
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Hillbilly,

    You sure you all don’t live down the road from me? :)

    Just watched my neighbor plant a couple 50 acres of tobacco… every year they plant, and every year they stop and offer to buy my truck, and every year I politely refuse and we pull a cork together… good people.

    Hey Hillbilly… if you all make likker, just make the good stuff – corn likker – and not that sugar likker they got coming out of Atlanta. Good for degreasing truck and tractor parts, but sippin whiskey it ain’t. Popcorn Sutton would roll in his grave if he knew they were making that stuff…

    Good call, bird-dogging those steel drums… now you got me wanting to lay in a supply. Don’t forget your coal oil… a 55 gallon blue drum is only a couple 300 bucks or so, delivered. Probably less if you source it locally. 55 gallons divided by 5 oil lamps = a pretty long time, I guess.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #23366
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Hillbilly wrote:</div>So I use 55 gallon drums, steel with clamping ring tops. I think they are airtight……snip…. I have discovered that with basics in mind, one drum holds enough beans and rice to last each person a year.

    Today I bought two 55 gal plastic drums for food storage. As Hillbilly commented they will hold close the the amount of food for one person for one year. I have been buying as much supplies as I can afford adding what I can as I go along. Well I really haven’t been stocking up like some others for years so I’m behind the eight ball on real requirements.

    I am using rice as a base staple to determine the required volume of food for each person for one year. One cup uncooked rice = 700 calories so each person needs at least 2 cups (uncooked) per day 1400 calories plus proteins and fats. 2 Cups of rice = 0.88 lbs. So rounded up to 1 lb per person per day = 365 lb per person for one year.

    A 55 gallon drum will hold about 440 lbs, one year of rice 365 lbs and about 100 lb of beans.

    #23376
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Rice, beans, pastas and such are very cost effective calories and so like most preppers I have lots set aside, but I also have focused on making sure I have plenty of other items (canned meats, veggies, fruits etc) so as to better assure reasonably balanced diets. For psychological boosts I have included some dessert items too. Don’t forget to include vitamins in the stash too.

    #23403
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    74, rice, beans and pasta is the way I started. Now I just add small amounts to the stock. What I am doing is can foods like can hams, chicken, vianna sausage, lots of sauce for the pasta, can pink salmon, tuna, sardines, cooking oils, and some soups.

    #23406
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    74, when you have a little extra cash order at Walmart some of the Augason Farms long life can foods, they last 25 to 30 years. Wallmart gives you free shipping on $50 orders.

    I order these items,

    Augason Farms Emergency Food Country Fresh 100% Instant Nonfat Dry Milk, 29 oz

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Augason-Farms-Emergency-Food-Country-Fresh-100-Instant-Nonfat-Dry-Milk-29-oz/21777157

    Augason Farms Emergency Food Cheese Blend Powder, 3 lbs To use on the pasta!

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Augason-Farms-Emergency-Food-Cheese-Blend-Powder-3-lbs/21777164

    Augason Farms Emergency Food Scrambled Egg Mix, 36 oz

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Augason-Farms-Emergency-Food-Scrambled-Egg-Mix-36-oz/21777156

    There are many more but these are the one’s I get the most of. Just enter Augason Farms and look around.

    #23437
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Free, MtB, Thanks. I have been buying loads of other foods as well. I’m just nowhere near having 3200 lbs of food in the house that we would need if we had to stay in place.

    #23461
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    When buying food in bulk you NEED to do two things either incorporate or get buying club status at the local wholesale levels, if you can get over a certain dollar amount they give you the stuff at the prices the stores pay. This goes for better brand items as well. It saves in general 25-50% of the price and can be delivered to your place.

    Incorporation helps as you can avoid some taxes as well, you can also pass on savings to normal friends who buy bulk items as well, still cheaper than a store though wal mart sometimes has ridiculous deals which are loss leaders.

    #23474
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    One can also shop the LDS (Mormon) locations and sites online for canned goods. (US and Canada)

    http://store.lds.org/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Category3_715839595_10557_3074457345616706237_-1_Y_image_0

    I’m not LDS but I am surrounded by them.

    Depending on your local grocery stores, they may have bulk purchase sales occasionally, our local store has case lot sales 3-4 times a year. Very handy for picking items up.

    The Provident Pantry aka Emergency Essentials brand of LTS foods is fairly priced and they have a sale going on right now. http://beprepared.com/#default

    #23482
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirlibird, thanks for the link will be on the look out for sales.

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