Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 35 total)
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  • #14930
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    I lost much of my stash to mice. Looking back maybe God was telling me something like, “Don’t do that again!” I would like to hear/start a string about what is needed per day per person to survive. There are a ton, no two tons, of web sites out there which love telling folks what is needed. I want to hear from folks here that have lived through times like mentioned.

    I think my time in Mogadishu is what made me go over the edge on what to stock and how much. This time I want to talk about this subject and find answers from folks I trust.

    Robin

    #14932
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Robin, If you think that you will have problems in the future with mice then you need can foods or store the food that is not in cans in steel trash cans or other steel containers. Rice, beans, grains, pasta all can be stored first in Mylar bags add oxygen absorbers and heat seal the Mylar bags. I buy them here,

    https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/packing_your_own_food_storage/packing_with_oxygen_absorbers.htm#.U4JC33aGcdA

    Once the food is in the Mylar bags you put them in the steel trash can and seal with an aluminum tape. This will stop the mice.

    The beans and rice are great because it has protein and you can add almost anything to it. For the pasta I buy powdered cheese.

    #14936
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    How often you checking your storage? Is it stored in bags, containers or buckets? I prefer canned food, and trying to keep my storage clean and checked a lot.

    I also like storing in buckets, but here it is not so easy to find good (for food) buckets.
    Jars are good ideas too, and keeping it in small packages (flour,sugar,rice…) instead big bags.

    Good idea is to look how much you eat today, and go with 1.5 more, or 2x for the time when SHTF.
    Your life when SHTF will be probably harder, you gonna work harder, and you gonna need more energy.
    It is about how much you need per day, or about how much you suppose to have per day.

    How much to store? As more as you can.

    Now, I need to say here that my experience with food from the SHTF time is kinda “interesting”, and I can not tell you how much I needed in SHTF, because I never had enough, I always needed more.

    Most of the time I did not have enough food, I was hungry more or less for months. So it is possible to survive with dramatically low amount of food. But it is not movie, I suffered a lot, both physically and psychologically, lost weight, get bunch of diseases, lost teeth, my performance sometimes was joke…

    Actually I still feeling consequences from that.

    #14938
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Robin start with understanding calories required.

    In this chart please note that they consider ‘active’ as ‘Active means a lifestyle that includes physical activity equivalent to walking more than 3 miles per day at 3 to 4 miles per hour, in addition to the light physical activity associated with typical day-to-day life’ ……and add more for SHTF type work. Stress alone burns lots of calories.

    Then know which foods provide the most calories and stock heavily in those: oatmeal, rice, wheat (the products you make with them) , and peanut butter, dates, coconut milk, cheese, meat, chocolate and oils I think are high in calories and not too bad for your health. Then add all the other stuff to go with it.

    Working a very small farm now, I burn calories. But, haha, don’t need to pay for a gym membership either.

    The best I have ever read, and from my experience I agree, is this post and inventory list from Granny Miller of her food storage list. True, she – like me – grows/raises and cans/processes most of her own storage – but I think it would give you a place to start. Each family is different in what food they like. But if you have calories in mind and read her post/look at her list and add/subtract and adjust it would be a good place to start.

    If you eventually want to grow and process some or all of your own food – her chart on how much to plant for a family of four of different vegetables etc is invaluable.

    She has been living this life and doing this for years – being self-sufficient as possible. Her blog will keep many people occupied for hours.

    HTH

    #14943
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    tweva, you are right on the calories.You need about 2,000 a day and if you are working a lot maybe 3,000. But you better have some protein too.

    #14947
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    It depends on your size physically The MDRIs for calories can meet the needs of the average Army personnel. Men and women should have 3,250 to 4,600 and 2,300 to 3,150 calories, respectively, per day, which will fluctuate based on size. The Departments of the Navy, Air Force and Army say the daily calorie requirements are based on a 174-pound, 69-inch man and a 136-pound, 64-inch woman. Individuals who are smaller than the reference size will require fewer calories, and larger individuals might have higher needs.

    Activity level and environment also affect caloric needs. Federal guidelines say heavy work or prolonged, vigorous physical training can increase calorie needs by 125 percent. Cold temperatures can increase calorie requirements by 5 percent to 10 percent, and individuals who perform strenuous work at altitudes above 10,000 feet might need 6,000 to 7,000 calories or 50 to 60 calories per kilogram of body weight per day

    When having to work all day  and on forced march  you can do 10,000 calories in a day. average MRE is 1300 calories.

    storage of food you need pest abatement in layers i use pain field generators, traps, mammalian sentry  and steel bins for storage, i got a bunch of used steel filing cabinets to store the 5 gallon pails in auctions for pennies cause they look ugly.

     

    #14967
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    The beans, rice and corn were in vacuum sealed bags. I had it all on steel self-standing shelving. Away from anything that could be used to climb into the bags. All was off the floor by at least 12 inches. ******* got in somehow. They chewed into the rear of the bags.

    I am now the Plastic Container King.

    I have owls that live in the water tower in my front yard. I never have had trouble with mice. Guess the owls may have taken a vacation to Florida.

    So far I have killed two snakes. They came in looking for mice.

    Thanks Selco for the information. Tweva, Freedom and Namelus: that is exactly the information I needed.

    Thanks to Wal-Mart I now will be caning verses buying food for after SHTF. Even that is going into plastic totes.

    I have 6 large plastic tubs ready for planting. This I will dehydrate and vacuum seal.

    Protein will be from deer, wild pig and fish. I don’t have to leave my front yard except to fish.

    Robin

    #14973
    Profile photo of Jayman
    Jayman
    Survivalist
    member2

    This may not be useful to you at this time, but there are a number of businesses – ice cream shops, dry goods stores, restaurants etc – who get products in 1 gallon or  5 gallon, air tight plastic buckets, and after they remove the contents, they trash the containers. If you ask, most will be happy to give you the buckets. You can pack them with bagged foods, add a dry pack, then if you want, seal the edges around the lid with silicone caulk to make doubly sure that the contents stay dry even if flooded.

    Sorry that you killed the snakes, though – I usually slide a shovel or something gently under them and take them to the creek bank a few hundred yards behind the house. I did have to kill one, years ago, because my dogs were barking at it and i was afraid it might – understandably – bite one of them. Felt bad about it, but that was a case of necessity.

    Good luck.

    #14978
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Robin, I buy at Wal-Mart the Augason Farms can foods that last 25 to 30 years. Wal-Mart has the cheapest prices.

    #14982
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    if you are using steel shelving you can use the dog cone anti lick  type collars on the bottom to stop pests( mice rats from climbing won’t stop bugs. the collars can be made of  any material but i use plastic or metal both seem to work fine just have to be at 6 inches off ground at the bottom and at least 6 inches taller at a 45 degree or closer to the main pole i have heard  people using pvc pipe to cover legs for a 12 inch section too slick to climb. seen rats climb 12 feet verticle on a stucco house wall so steel shelving not a problem at all.

     

    go to a housing recycle store we get ours there since Mylar packed the buckets  only need lid and food grade. get them with lids for $1 each just need to wash but i do that anyways before food packing.

     

    if buying a lot you can call local ropak rep and get a bulk deal on a pallet worth of buckets.

    The only thing different in HDPE food grade is the type of chemical used for the release/anti stick chemical. if using mylar it should not  penetrate the mylar to contaminate the food if washed using soapy water as it is a surface treatment of the plastic not an embedded chemical as far as my knowledge goes on it.

     

    #14984
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Robin,

    Do not discount the old ways of preserving foods because they’re not “new”…

    Taking a bit of mineral oil and rubbing it over (coating) a fresh egg will allow it to keep much, much longer than normal. My old addlepated brain says eggs treated this will will last months, but best to test that premise out on a batch of eggs now while we are in plenty…

    Also, someone sent me the recipe for Scottish Eggs – basically a hard boiled egg that’s been peeled and coated in steel cut oats. Eggs treated this way lasted much longer for a journey, but I have no idea how long they remain viable. Best to test.

    Biltong. Get with Leopard. Maybe they know the recipe. Also pemmican. Traditional pemmican used rendered fat, bits of jerked meat and cranberries. It kept so well, the Lewis and Clark expedition survived on almost nothing but pemmican for their explorations. The fat is just packed solid with lipids and calories – the raw fuel your body needs during heavy exertion. Dried meat provided protein and the cranberries provided Vitamin C. I made some before. It’s actually not bad. Very filling.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #14986
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    At my BOL we are using recipe for drying the fruit and meat on old traditional way ( barrels and smoked houses). It is great way for preserving the food, and also that stuff is very tasty.

    And it is not so hard.

    #14991
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Selco,

    I’d be very interested in the recipe/process used to dry fruits and meat in your area of the world…

    Just because we don’t do it here in the US, does not mean it’s not a good idea…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #14992
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Malgus wrote:</div>
    Selco, I’d be very interested in the recipe/process used to dry fruits and meat in your area of the world… Just because we don’t do it here in the US, does not mean it’s not a good idea…

    Actually some of us do dry/dehydrate meat, fruits and vegetables.

    The secret is to go big. The larger dehydrator is a key factor, the little ones just don’t have the capacity to deal with a deer/elk or any other large critter.

    The new dehydrator I’m building is 30″x30″x 4′ high. With slots for 16 trays, or 4 trays of strips hanging. Just remember to rotate. The last one was left when we moved, no room to bring it.

    Here’s an article for thought:

    http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/hooker41.html

    Biltong:

    http://www.africhef.com/Biltong-Recipe.html

    http://www.markblumberg.com/biltong.html

     

    And a three part article that is well worth the read.

    http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/aldridge138.html

    #15028
    RROAMM
    RROAMM
    Survivalist
    member2

    if you are looking for canning jars, hit up your local thrift stores and the like. We picked up over 16 cases (192 jars) of pints and 10 cases (120 jars) of quarts for $ 100.00. most of them had never been used and over half had there rings and bands.

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