Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #26553
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Hey Everyone!

    We’re getting the first dusting of snow here and winter will soon be upon us. I spent a few mins today checking the ‘essentials’ in my car. While I have much more stuff than this, I would consider this the minimum equipment to have in a car with me, just thought I’d share it.

    All of these items are easy to obtain and should not be expensive:

    1) Jump start cables (and now how to safely use them) I prefer to buy ‘heavy duty’ cables as I have had a couple of monumentally spectacular ‘close calls’ with the cheaper, thinner ones.
    2) A spare fuel can with nozzle (90% full)
    3) A warning triangle
    4) A high visibility vest
    5) A small foam pad (to kneel on if changing a tire or inspecting underneath the car)
    6) A static tow rope. I use caribiners on either end to allow for quick attachment/removal.
    7) A head lamp and spare batteries
    8) A pair of work gloves
    9) One or two spare pairs of warm gloves/hat/socks
    10) One or two wool blankets
    11) High energy long life snacks (I keep in the glove compartment)
    12) Hand sanitiser
    13) ‘Fix a flat’ emergency tire inflator
    14) A snow shovel
    15) A physical road atlas (in case all electronic options are unviable)
    16) Depending how you dress for work a pair of good boots and a warm jacket in the trunk maybe required…
    17) Roll of duct tape
    18) Wet wipes

    It’s also worth checking your jack, spare tire, jack points etc are all in good condition and working properly…

    Even if it’s not winter near you yet, it’s still worth a few minutes getting these or similar items stowed away in your vehicle! Hope this helps :)

    #26568
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Excellent list! Add to that: Bottles of water (it doesn’t pay to get dehydrated esp if stranded. Can keep one or two inside your jacket to keep them from freezing.)
    Hand warmer packets (I find changing a tire in icy weather drains/numbs my hands in short order, then I skin my knuckles etc easily.)
    In our current location, a good rain jacket/poncho since cold wet rain is more hypothermia-producing than cold powder snow.

    #26571
    Profile photo of Ghost Prime
    Ghost Prime
    Survivalist
    member6

    Toby, good idea. You may also want to check out your regular winter gear to see how it works in the real world. Last winter, it got down to -10F with a -30F wind chill. I took advantage of the weather to put on my heavy winter clothing and go for a hike. I discovered two weaknesses in my gear that I have remedied so don’t forget to check out all your gear, not just put it in your car/BO bag/ etc as it must work.

    For God, Family, Country, & Liberty!

    #26573
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Foe anyone buying items on the list, make sure the carabiners rated strength matches the tow strap. Toby maybe you could post the rating of the carabiners youe are using.

    #26638
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    Great Timing!!!
    Lots easier to assemble the winter Emergency Pack now, rather than later…

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #26657
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Carabiners are rated to 4000kgs if I remember correctly.

    As the winter temps. are routinely -20c or below, I don’t keep water in the car as it just freezes. I mentioned I have a bunch of other stuff in the car, one of which is a spirit stove with fuel, so if I need water I would melt the ice/snow.

    Yes, it is essential you check your winter gear to make sure it’s up to the task!

    Thanks for the comments so far :)

    #26667
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    4000kg = 8818lbs Pulling heavy vehicles out should probably be done with higher rated rigging to be safe.
    More info at:

    http://www.offroaders.com/tech/Tow_Straps.htm

    #26794
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    I have a 10,000 pound Warn on the front of my suv vehicle (detachable) when I go into the woods or need to use it. But to actually use it to full potential since my vehicle is only 4000 pounds I would have to hook rear end to a tree or something. In fact this winch is way to strong for my vehicle but I also have a truck with a bumper able to take the weight. I can’t imagine breaking grade 8 bolts but you never know. I lifted the front of my truck off the ground trying to take down a tree limb once. Thats why its called the art of winching. Nice to have though.

    #26841
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I used to live in Maine , and every year , Maine State troopers would find somebody dead by the side of the road . Most of the time the reason is the same , they underestimated the weather , and attempted to walk to that little town that didnt seem that far away , instead of staying put in their car . Now I live in Arizona , the desert is a different ball game . A large tarp is a must to have , as temps inside a car will be higher than outside your car ……even if its 117 degrees out .

    #26845
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Tolik, I would add that people who freeze to death in the manner you describe invariably didn’t have proper cold weather gear in their vehicles. Most winter clothing is more designed to look robust than to actually be robust, and for those who go from a heated house to a heated car to a heated store or office it is fine. They only discover that they are inadequately dressed when they have to be outside for a long time in the cold.

    #26847
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    That is a good point .

    #26851
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Having had my share of frozen fingers, toes, and ears over the years, I learned all are preventable. It just takes a little effort when you are buying clothes to focus on functionality rather than fashion. Then again, maybe I do look fashionable when I wear this hat? It keeps my head and ears warm on the absolute coldest of days.

    http://www.furhatworld.com/wool-buffalo-check-rabbit-fur-aviator-hat-red-p-1279.html

    #26852
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews
    #26854
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    The Russian ones are good too but I stick with the New England look. Easier to blend in that way.

    #27331
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Great points. And yes, getting people to understand the problems of extreme weather is becoming more and more challenging as so many move from climate controlled space to climate controlled space and purchase clothing based on fashion instead of functionality…

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.