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  • #52194
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    We had our 1st frost of the season last night and a pretty good one at that. The autumn-like weather began a week or two ago and so not a big surprise getting a frost. I didn’t do a garden this year so no impact on me. Our son is building a house and I’m part of the unpaid unskilled labor force. I couldn’t do that and a big garden too.

    It was a pretty mild (though wet) summer. It never hit 90 which is fine with me. The days that it got up into the 80’s were tough enough. Of course as much as I prefer cooler weather I am cognizant that the Vermont forests are full of reminders of the farms that were there and then abandoned in the 1800’s when people moved west for better lands and a more conducive climate.

    Neighbors and I picked apples from my trees yesterday for a cider making party we’re having on Monday. I have a small cider press that we use. I love autumn.

    #52199
    Profile photo of Inshala
    Inshala
    Veteran
    member4

    Personally, I would have preferred a slightly longer summer. Last winter was far too harsh to not have some relief. Here, in Occupied NY, Summer was the last week in June and the first two weeks of July. Oh well…no sense in lamenting what cannot be controlled.

    What kind of crops does Vermont soil yield?

    "If I'm gonna die, I'm gonna die historic on the Fury Road."

    #52201
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    As you might guess most farms in VT are small family farms. The terrain does not lend itself to large tracts that can be corporately farmed. Traditional dairy is in decline as it is just too hard to compete with the big corporate farms in the midwest. The ones that do OK have gone organic or supply the regional cheese and yogurt manufacturers, or that make their own. Some farms have switched to small scale beef operations for local markets. The land is good for sheep and goats too. Most farms grow their own hay and corn for their animals. Apples thrive here and there has been huge growth in making hard cider. The Woodchuck and Angry Orchards brands are headquartered here. I have seen a trend towards trying different things such as grapes for wine, hops for local microbrews, honey etc. Anything that might keep the farms afloat. There are as well farms that do a certain amount of veggies for Farmer’s Markets and grocery store “local produce” sections. Locally produced is very popular here.

    The two things we are best at is making maple syrup and growing stones. Maple syrup is part of our cultural identity. The fake “Aunt Jemima type stuff doesn’t cut it here.

    As for stones you don’t even have to plant small pebbles in hopes of them growing into big ones. They seem to grow all on their own as the freeze-thaw cycle slowly brings them to the surface. We have to assemble the stone walls ourselves though.

    I did read somewhere a govt. study that said VT is the only State on the East Coast that has enough agricultural resources to feed its own population. Of course only 624,000 people live here.

    #52205
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Well inshala and MB…..Since the eclipse summer just seems to have stopped. The night temps went down with a bang to low forties and below. The heating season has begun. And a cold rain fell…. Our county in Ny has an unfunded medicaid mandate around its neck. To pay the taxes and farm/work here you might as well be a slave. Everytime i eventhink about owning more land or building another house my feet balls freeze. We are not retired but under this system we’ll be working boobs the rest of our lives. Truely here its possible to become poor very quickly and nearly impossible to make large increases in income. They should erect a statue of Marx in Albany and a statue of RELee in Manhatten next to the bull. Short description of York. Sanctuary state with a free tuition problem for underfunded snowflakes. Tell us what you make, we’ll charge what you can afford. Gas up 23 cents in two days since Houston. $3.17 for ethanol free premium 91. Just another 33 cents and it won’t be worth starting the car to go to work. $3.50 a gal. Bad news about refineries and the colonial pipeline. A very expensive rebuild needed. The trail of broken insurance companies is going to be awesome. President Trump will be able to go to congress & liberal republican swine and demand the wall. Kick out the Daca babies and Paul Ryan. Then there will be action. Irma goes to wash yes. Then demo antifa gets flushed. One can hope.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    #52212
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    We’ve been very fortunate here in our area – too much rain for a few weeks almost non-stop, but overall not bad. I’m not even sure it officially hit 100° this year, though 99° certainly was probable, and our home thermometers both showed just barely over 100° once or twice – still not too bad for an entire summer here. We’ve only gotten down to the very high 60°s a night or two so far. So, I’m hopeful that we can still get in a decent fall garden now that the spring/summer veggies have all seen their last days. Best crop we’ve ever had – ever, anywhere.

    The wild card for us now is Irma. If the current forecast holds, though we won’t get what Florida will get, it could be exceptionally bad here if Irma comes up the west coast of Florida and hits the panhandle. It’s been years since a major hurricane came up through that area and got us (still quite a bit inland from the Gulf). But this storm is getting scary – 180 mph winds and hurricane force winds wider than the entire Florida peninsula. If that spares most of Florida and heads up into GA/AL, we’re in serious trouble. Toilet paper? √ Water? √ Protection? √ Food? √ But also hordes of ****-cockroachus now populating the area since Katrina (came and never left – better “pickin’s” here than goin’ back to Nawlens). Could get interesting. Flood insurance? Uh…. not in a flood zone (that’s what most of Houstonians thought, so ….).

    So, we’ll all (hopefully) check back in a week and see what else has been dealt to a nation that refuses to wake up and fly right….

    Brulen and Inshala, my heart goes out to you. I finished high school and college in NY, went into the military, and never looked back. I had a friend in college that went into the Air Force and promptly changed his residence to where he was stationed. He filed his final income tax form with NY, and made the check payable to “Rocky’s Welfare State” (which tells you how long ago THAT was!). They cashed it without comment. I LOVE parts of NY, especially the Finger Lakes region, and even some of the outskirts of Buffalo. But there is nothing – not a single thing – that could ever induce me to move back there. As I said, my heart goes out to the two of you – I understand!

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #52230
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Frost? I can wait a while.
    Still around 54 when I go into work at 430.
    Considering the 5′ of snow in my front yard last year, I can wait a while longer.
    Never really appreciated a snow blower until we moved here.

    I am done with the forest fires to the west I will admit. The moon looked nasty an hour ago, with all the smoke in the air.
    A few are saying that some of these fires won’t be out until the snow falls. How’s that for fun.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Whirlibird Whirlibird.
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