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  • #45452
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    For the 2nd time in a month someone I know has had a fire. Now insurance will pay to rebuild and firemen will quickly respond but post-SHTF fires will burn until they run out of fuel and there won’t be any insurance checks coming. Not that anyone is ever purposely careless with fire, come SHTF best we be extra careful. A month ago on a different property that he owns in town the farmer who pastures sheep on my property lost a barn full of hay, wool, and equipment to a fire started by hay that wasn’t fully dry igniting. This morning was also on a farm. A fire started in an old barn used as a repair shop and quickly spread to a trailer next to it. An old woman I know had lived in that trailer ever since the main farmhouse burned years ago after lightening struck it. Rather than rebuild back then she put the money into the farm. Even if she had insurance on the trailer it wouldn’t come to enough to buy much of anything, and who wants to start over yet again in their 80’s. She’s resilient though and between her 7 kids, 19 grandchildren, 19 great grandchildren, and many many friends she’ll be OK but were this post-SHTF, what others could do for her would be very limited as compared to today.

    #45456
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The #1 killer of Mountain Men was being burnt out of the cabin in dead of winter, at least that was their fear. Throngs of people are still killed today from fires, much less survive a winter afterwards.

    If you eliminated electricity fire prevention would be easy; keep your combustibles away from ignition sources. Keep flammables outside your domicile.

    Because we use electricity, and run wires throughout the buildings we live in fire prevention becomes more difficult. The arc flash of an electrical short is about 2000* F. It will ignite most anything. It doesn’t help that electrical insulation is combustible. Make certain that your electrical system is installed properly and don’t mess around with the wires if you don’t know exactly what you’re doing.

    #45458
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    So it goes without saying that SEVERAL decent-sized fire extinguishers (monitored for proper pressure) are an essential part of preparations. And unfortunately, many people simply don’t know all the various ways spontaneous combustion can occur – even a pile of old newspapers, old photographic film, etc.

    Plus, what is stored near what? We keep our 1 pound bottles of propane, as well as the larger ones, in a shed quite a distance from the house, for example. But spray cans are bad news. Ever tried a Bic lighter with Right Guard deodorant to fry insects when you were a kid? Those are mini-flame throwers! They do “wonders” when they blow up. Do an inventory and look what’s flammable, where it’s stored (particularly if it’s in the house), and re-arrange if appropriate. Plus, if you have a gas water heater in a utility closet, what’s also in there slowly building up fumes that could be ignited by the pilot light, or the sudden burner ignition when the heater comes on?

    Good thread!

    #45506
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Big open box of baking soda next to the stove works wonders!
    Robin

    #45551
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Robin, I’ve got a few fire extinguishers throughout our house – With burglar bars on every single window – it’s a must. And then a box of baking soda. Many people will ask – why the baking soda in every cupboard. I often think it is a fire risk to keep jerry cans with fuel inside the house… but outside the house the fuel would get stolen or worse. They will use it to burn the house down.

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