Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #29238
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    my father finally went to c a doctor about surgery for his carprol tunnel. (spelling sorry)

    they prescribed an anti depressant ffs…

    pms-amitriptyline 10mg

    anyone have any intel or experience with this for pain? i do not trust reviews on the web.

    rest assured this doctor is now under my micro scope…

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #29242
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    amitriptyline is a steroid is won’t reduce pain. It will make him feel very tired.

    #29244
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    *cracks fingers* everyone should have a pit bull in the corner when they visit a doctor…

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #29245
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    KOS, does your father have diabetes with the carpal tunnel problem? Or has the carpal tunnel problem come after using power tools (vibration)?

    #29246
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Kos,
    The doc is tring to cure the illness instead of treating a symptom.

    #29247
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    negative c, just carpal tunnel. 74 he will be going to surgery soon hopefully.

    mmm, just gonna be skeptical till i get the facts straight. nerve pain and inflimation… i would have expected an opiate… not a psyc med…

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #29248
    Profile photo of hillbilly chic
    hillbilly chic
    Survivalist
    member2

    my husband has carpal tunnel syndrome also plus permenantly brokenvenicular bones in both wrists [not sure if im pronouncing these words wright]] the largest bones in your wrist had surgery says its a big mistake i dont trust dr.s personally they get too many kickbacks and free samples from the drug companys were all mill workers down here carpet,well till they went to south america anyhow,so lots of repetive motion problems,anti depressants are not for pain when i have to have a tooth cut out i make them prescribe me talwin its extremely strong also older drug from when they had to do 20 years of testing before allowed on market i dont take as prescribed only as needed also anti depressants are full of estrogen not good for any man google it ,good guy look out for our elders hillbilly chic

    #29251
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Here’s some ideas for alternatives before surgery. The suggested are on page 9 but the background on carpal tunnel is worth reading.

    http://www.lef.org/protocols/neurological/carpal-tunnel-syndrome/page-01

    Have you tried vitamin B6 from rich food sources?

    http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/abcs-of-nutrition/vitamin-b6-the-under-appreciated-vitamin/

    If he’s really inflamed finding the reason for the inflammation should be the number one focus. Serratiopeptidase is great for inflammation and will reduce pain associated with inflammation but it’s just a band-aid on the problem until you find what is causing the inflammation and stop it at the source.

    #29254
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    i will have to ask him, stubborn as he is, he is about ready to try anything right now (hence my skepticism), diagnosed 2 years ago, just can’t tough it out anymore.

    suicide and seizures are not exactly the kind of side effects you want to play the lottery with…

    and being on psyc meds are a convenient excuse to seize weapons…

    tyvm for the info, digesting it now.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #29260
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Steroids reduce swelling, for carpal tunnel and other inflamation injuries, they work well.

    #29261
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Serratiopeptidase worked really well for me when I had inflammation and pain. You can buy it in a health food store. I’m very sensitive to medicines, and as far as I know it’s completely safe.

    Did the carpal tunnel problem come from vibration from power tools or repetitive use injury?

    #29270
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    still have not found anything mentioning this drug for this use, but the night is young.

    C, hes done it all as far as work goes. does a lot of office work now a days.

    i would feel better about this medication if the wiki said for pain and inflamation and not for major depression, chance of seizures, suicide or black tounge… i will re read it to make sure i haven’t missed it. (odds of winning a money lottery are 1 in 176 million, i want to know the numbers for this drug… i know how insurance works… doctors love insurance…)

    this doctor… better know what she is doing. people in prince george have brain damage… enviro is so toxic they don’t need to spray for insects…

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #29288
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    KOS go find a good chiropractor that practices graystons techniques and see if they can help, it hurts like hell but works as it breaks up the scar tissue and you learn how to “nerve floss” to stop the binding up pinching which is cause of carpal tunnel, most surgeries dont fix anything long term as the scarring comes back.

    depending on where the bind point is you will need to “work” the area at home every day. this involves a rounded but pointy object think old worn tooth from a saber tooth tiger. you can make one in shop. I know it works first hand, i have full motion and strength back two other family member can hold a coffee pot, or open jar top after surgery. i can cut 1/8 iron plate with tin snips now again.

    #29291
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    namelus, sorry we are way passed that. that kind of pain with this much damage, the man would have to be sedated or pass out trying… something i get to look forward to in my future, if i live that long.

    well im done surfing the net for answers, i am going to crack open a few encyclopedias… id rather something tried and true for inflammation, and a non reactive pain killer to go with it… than this two month dose of amitriptyline which it sounds like she wants to increase the dose over time… because surgery may take that long to happen… and from what i read increase in dose is increase in chances…

    The pamphlet she sent home with him is insulting to say the least… and from what i gather about her reputation she has a real attitude, makes sense considering where she is from. Wish i knew where to go for a second opinion around here… best place is edmonton…

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #29292
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Kos – the doctor is not crazy prescribing this. Opiates do not help nerve pain. They may zone you out enough so you don’t step in front of a bus to get away from the constant pain, but that’s about it. I have had lots of nerve pain in my life and can tell you that much. Amitriptyline is standard treatment/often best treatment for nerve pain. I’ve taken it and am alive. It did not change my mental state at all while on it. See following:


    Many people living with chronic pain are daunted by the prospect of long term or even permanent drug therapy. What are these drugs, are they safe and how do they work? Concerns such as these can stop people persevering with medicines that may offer a real, life-enhancing solution to their condition. Dr Mick Serpell explains how amitriptyline works and gives reassurance about the side effects that you might experience, especially in the early stages

    The main aims in managing chronic pain are to relieve or to reduce the pain and, just as importantly, to improve your quality of life and get you doing more. There are four approaches to pain management:

    1) physical therapy (physiotherapy, acupuncture, TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation), etc.

    2) drug therapy

    3) regional analgesia (injection of drugs around nerves or other tissues)

    4) psychological therapies (techniques which improve coping with pain).

    Two types of pain

    Doctors describe pain as either nociceptive, neuropathic, or a combination of the two. It is important to distinguish between the two types of pain, as they need different medicines.

    Nociceptive pain is pain that starts off as a response to tissue damage or a painful stimulus like a hot surface. Examples include mechanical low back pain and degenerative or inflammatory joint pain, and so it is easy to understand why nociceptive pain is the most common form of chronic pain. Although these pains may begin as purely nociceptive, over time there may be changes within the nervous system that may result in neuropathic pain.

    Neuropathic pain may also be the result of nerve damage that makes the nerve overactive. Therefore the drugs used for neuropathic pain are aimed at stabilisation or “calming” of the overactive nerves. Perhaps it should be no surprise that drugs used in other conditions where nervous tissue is overactive or “excited”, such as epilepsy or depression, have turned out to be useful medicines for chronic pain where the nerves have become overactive.

    Drug therapy

    Conventional painkillers such as codeine and ibuprofen are used for nociceptive pain. They are often not effective for neuropathic pain. Most of the drugs used for the relief of neuropathic pain were originally developed to treat different conditions. For instance, amitriptyline is an antidepressant drug but is now probably used more commonly for pain than for its original use. The situation is the same for some anticonvulsant drugs, which are used more frequently for neuropathic pain than epilepsy.

    Change your lifestyle

    Always remember that the medicine alone will not be enough. While drug therapy can play a major role in the management of pain, changing your lifestyle (such as building up your fitness and getting more exercise), as well as learning to manage and cope with your pain better, are also vital to the successful outcome.

    General principles of drug therapy

    Your doctor will start you off at a low dose of your medicine and this is increased up to a suitable dosage and taken for sufficient duration until you obtain noticeable pain relief (or experience severe side effects). This procedure of increasing the dose step by step while monitoring the effect is called “titrating the dose”. If there is no relief the drug will be stopped. Your doctor is likely to gradually wean you off the medication over one to two weeks, to avoid potential side effects from sudden withdrawal. If you get partial, but inadequate pain relief, a second different drug can be prescribed in addition.

    Once you are on the right dose and drug combination for you then you may continue on the medication indefinitely. You and your doctor may decide that you should wean yourself off the medicines gradually every six months or so to ensure they are still necessary for you.

    Most doctors agree that medication for chronic pain should be taken “round the clock” rather than “as required”. It is easier to keep pain at bay rather than trying to control it after it has been allowed to resurface.

    Antidepressants

    The tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline, are the “gold standard” for neuropathic pain as they are the most effective and best-known drugs for this condition. They can also be useful for chronic nociceptive pain, especially if there is a neuropathic component to it. They appear to work in the nervous system by reducing the nerve cell’s ability to re-absorb chemicals such as serotonin and noradrenaline. These chemicals are called neural transmitters. If they are not reabsorbed they accumulate outside the nerve cell and the result is suppression of pain messages in the spinal cord.

    All in the mind?

    The way antidepressants give pain relief is completely separate from the anti-depressant effect. The dose required for treating depression is much higher (often over 150 milligrams (mg) a day) than the doses used for pain relief. Also, there are many different antidepressant drugs available that are effective for treating depression, but only a small number are also effective pain killers.

    It is important that the patient is given a full explanation of the rationale for antidepressant therapy. It is not that the doctor believes your pain is due to depression. So do not think that you are not being taken seriously and that the pain is “all in the mind”.

    Of course, depression can occur with chronic pain, but it is usually an understandable reaction to the pain and improves as the chronic pain improves. However, if severe, it too may require treatment with an antidepressant drug.”

    After the surgery – have him do what Namelus suggests or it will come back eventually. IMO HTH

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