Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #33412
    RROAMM
    RROAMM
    Survivalist
    member2

    found this on thesurvivalmom.com, it is a nice read and down in the comments section, a commenter went and did a USDA RDA calculation on the nutritional value of the meal plan.

    http://thesurvivalmom.com/famine-menu-food-storage/

    It is a good start for someone just beginning to get their food storage going.

    #33417
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    RROAMM, thanks for the link. I like thesurvivalmom.com. It’s a good, common sense website.

    Here’s an example of a very simple survival rations from Sharon Astyk. Since I cannot eat grains, my rations look very different:

    http://eatkamloops.org/how-many-independence-days-do-you-have-each-year/

    #33421
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thank you , that is interesting . Buckwheat is another grain that is very versatile .

    #33445
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Thanks for the link.

    #33484
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>RROAMM wrote:</div>found this on thesurvivalmom.com, it is a nice read and down in the comments section, a commenter went and did a USDA RDA calculation on the nutritional value of the meal plan.

    http://thesurvivalmom.com/famine-menu-food-storage/

    It is a good start for someone just beginning to get their food storage going.

    Esther Dickey wrote Passport to Survival in 1969. Scrounging around a second hand bookstore years later I bought it for 7 bucks. Same thing but more recipes. Four foods to use and store. It doesn’t mention buckwheat. A small oversight with so much wheat and oats around. I did just see a story about a shortage of buckwheat in Russia though. It doesn’t seem possible to me unless its being stockpiled. That’s a signpost. Russians prepping up to US destabilizing the world. Food prices going up. The turbulent 60s and 70s all over again but more so.

    #33486
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    It probably is being stockpiled or diverted ” somewhere ” , as that is one of their popular staples , has been for centuries . I read an interesting article awhile back , about how American farmers in the 1800’s started to switch from growing corn over wheat , because they could get better crop yields .

    #33489
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    This article probably addresses the issue.

    “Following the news of a bad buckwheat harvest, panic buying of the traditional foodstuff sent prices soaring in a sign that some analysts say is likely linked to economic anxieties, not harvest yields.

    The run on buckwheat “indicates people’s expectations of an upcoming economic crisis, to which consumers are always keenly attuned,” said Natalia Kolupaeva, a retail analyst at Raiffeisenbank.

    Prices for buckwheat started to grow at the end of October on reports of a bad harvest in the Altai region in Siberia, which produces about 40 percent of the buckwheat in Russia.

    News of the bad harvest spread like wildfire, causing consumers to panic even in regions hundreds of kilometers away from Siberia. Several large retail chains reported that customers were buying out stocks of buckwheat as soon as they appeared on the shelf.

    Since then, the average wholesale price of buckwheat has spiraled up to about 45 rubles (96 cents) per kilogram, with prices growing by up to 80 percent in some regions, according to news agency RIA Novosti.

    State statistics service Rosstat reported Wednesday that prices for buckwheat grew by 27.5 percent on average since the beginning of November.  

    But analysts said there is no logical basis for double-digit price hikes.

    “Russia is expected to produce over 700,000 tons of buckwheat this year, more than enough to meet the annual demand, which is about 650,000 tons.

    “The growth of price [for buckwheat] is noneconomic, so when things cool down prices should drop by about 30 percent,” Vladimir Petrichenko, the head of ProZerno analytical center, was quoted by news agency TASS as saying on Wednesday.”

    “This is just hysteria cased by the poor harvest in the Altai region,” he added.

    http://www.themoscowtimes.com/business/article/russia-s-traditional-economic-barometer-swings-toward-crisis/511479.html

    #33512
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Sounds like the panic hoarding of .22lr…

    #33516
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Doesn’t it tho ………..just goes to show that peoples lack of self control create artificial shortages . Ammo in this country is a very good example , Manufacturers produced as much as they always have , they even went full bore to try to keep up demand of a panicked public , with no self restraint , but in reality , there was no shortage . Then here comes all the paranoid conspiracy theories by the fear mongers of all the survival web sites , when in reality , THEY ( the public ) , and they alone , are the ones to blame . glad you mentioned it .

    #33699
    Profile photo of Vep
    Vep
    Survivalist
    member4

    Ester Dickey meant well, but her plan is very wheat intensive. Wheat is a labor intensive to prepare. Mrs. Dickey was Mormon and Mormons store large amounts of wheat as part of their contingency planning because Joseph Smith said to do so in the Doctrine and Covenants (one of the books in the Mormon canon alongside the KJV Bible and the Book of Mormom).

    Excessive amounts of wheat can also be hard on the digestive and immune system, especially for the very young and very old. Like a lot of Mormon food storage plans, her plan is also very powdered milk intensive. If your ethnic background isn’t White European, then you could have a problem with that. Other races have a much higher rate of lactose intolerance that Whites do once a person hits puberty.

    For an emergency stockpile, rice and lentils is a better choice. Together they supply most of the nutrients that you need. they store well and they go a long way. Rice doesn’t rely upon grinding and other time consuming, messy preparation methods. you just cook it. Lentils are the most nutritious of legumes (beans) and they are the only legume that doesn’t require pre-soaking when dry. They are also one of the least expensive legumes you can buy.

    For a basic food supply rice and lentils, plus salt, a few inexpensive cooking spices from Walmart, multivitamins, tea, coffee, and drink mixes. Drink mixes are important in that they make crappy tasting but otherwise biologically safe water drinkable. Tea and coffee can do the same and are comforting. High citric acid drink mixes have a tangy taste that also covers up the taste of inexpensive veterinary oral antibiotics that come in a water soluble powder.

    #33712
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Avoid spices like Curry and Cumin , simply put ………..They Stink ! , like a fat man on a tread mill , and can be smelled a long distance away , they are also so pungent , that the get onto your clothing and person , very similar to the way cigarette smoke does .

    #33719
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    White rice, black beans, red beans, all types of beans have great protein. Tea, coffee are good too.

    #33720
    Profile photo of Vep
    Vep
    Survivalist
    member4

    The basic spices I’ve tended to stockpile for basic food storage are powdered onion, powdered garlic, Italian seasoning, dried serrano peppers, bay leaves, hot sauce, salt, and black pepper.

    The powdered onion, powdered garlic, and Italian seasoning I get in quantity are the inexpensive 5th Season brand at Walmart.

    One thing I forgot to add to the previous list is a natural oil, like olive oil. It provides necessary calories and fat, plus necessary omega-3s fatty acid to your diet. People are used to hearing about diets limiting calories, but for an emergency food stockpile you want to pack in as much calories as possible. One quart of extra virgin olive oil is 7680 calories, or 120 calories per tablespoon.

    A minimum daily ration of half-pound of dry lentils is 520 calories, and a half a pound of dry rice is 800 calories, so that is 1320 calories per day as a bare minimum survival ration which will also keep your stomach filled. Add in six tablespoons of olive oil spread out over 3 meals that is an extra 720 calories per day. At 2040 calories, per person, per day, that diet is the equivalent of 3.7 McDonalds ‘Big Mac’ hamburger sandwiches per day. It will keep you alive, and you can enhance your food storage from there.

    In addition to the multivitamins, sore an excess of vitamin C tables. That is the one nutrient our bodies cannot manufacture and flooding your system with it boosts the immune system which is your #1 protection against disease.

    #33723
    Profile photo of Vep
    Vep
    Survivalist
    member4

    Often in history famines are not a complete absence of food, but a functioning food shortage

    For an example from modern history of what could be called a functioning food shortage, but not quite a famine, would be the food shortages and strict rationing during the occupation of Germany following the end of WWII.

    During that time, one eyewitness account talked about a typical breakfast for a single, widowed, working mother of six children and her kids. It would be a slice of bread each and a cup of tea. That was it, it was all they had. The kids still had to go to school, and she still had to go to work every day.

    Their dinner would be doled out from a single pot of potato soup. The ingredients for the family dinner would be one potato, one onion, and a half pint of milk. That was for one adult female and six children.

    #33724
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Vep ,
    being a southwesterner , I have access to almost every chili around , ever tried dried Ancho peppers ? they are not hot but have a very strong , rich , smokey flavor . Dried , they are black , but reconstituted are dark red , similar to a chipotle . Jalapeno powder is another one I store .
    Here is another WW2 one : German POW’s held by the Soviets ( early war years ) , thin potato soup consisting of mostly water , some potatoes , and once in a while , barley . That was lunch and dinner at the same time . Breakfast was a cup of tea and a very small portion of bread ( if available ) , after that sumptuous meal , they could look forward to a day full of hard labor in freezing temps .

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