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  • #2570
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Family Survival: Let’s not forget the kids

    Survival-Family-Bug-Out
    If a disaster should happen, and you have children in your home, who’s survival are you going to think about first? Your kids, of course. But does your current survival plan really include your children? Have you rehearsed your plan and tested your gear? If not you should.

    Family Survival goes beyond teaching your children how to evacuate your house in case of an emergency…..because in some disasters, your house may only be a distant memory and you and your family are forced to bug out with hopefully more than just an emergency blanket.

    Here are some ideas on how to think about your kids, through their different life stages, while planning for emergency preparedness.

    INFANTS:

    In this category, we may need to take some advice from the hippies. Breast feeding and cloth diapering are the way to go should a disaster arise. Let’s face it, you’re not going to be running to Wally world to buy formula and pampers, so why not be prepared by utilizing these two methods of baby care in the first place? A nursing mom can keep her baby going indefinitely in even the most dire situation, as long as she has some access to water and nutrients for herself. What could be better preparedness than that?
    Another essential infant survival tool to invest in, is a good baby carrier or sling. In the event that you have to move somewhere on foot, this is an absolutely must. Additionally, they also work well for sleeping, as most infants will sleep wonderfully in a sling, and when disaster arises the last thing we are going to be carrying around is a pack n’ play. You can also get carriers that are more sturdy and can hold children up to 40 pounds by manufacturer recommendation.

    TODDLERS/YOUNG CHILDREN:

    Clothes and Shelter: Do you have items for your young children packed in your bug out bag and your car emergency kit? You should, because most likely your child or children will not be able to carry their own emergency kits. If they don’t make sleeping bags small enough for your little one, try sleep sacks, they go up to toddler sizes. What about all weather gear? Think extremities – hands, feet and head. Your child’s light-up princess tennis shoes simply aren’t going to do the trick in the event of TEOTWAWKI. Look for some sturdy all weather boots or shoes. Also think about a few good pairs of warm socks (Smart Wool) as well as good gloves and a hat. Also make sure you have a tent or shelter that fits your whole family, not just your one man Rambo tent. Always plan like SHTF will happen in the worst possible weather.
    Food: Even in a disaster situation, your kids might be picky. Yes, when they get hungry enough, will eat whatever you have, but you might be worried about their nutritional needs. That’s why your survival gear should include supplements & vitamins that are also safe for your children. Organics supplements are made solely from organic fruits and veggies, so they are perfectly safe for even the youngest child. If your child is too little to swallow a capsule, simply open the capsule and sprinkle the powder in food or liquid. Like I said, when they are hungry enough, they will surely eat it. Also remember Murphy’s Laws of SHTF – “Food, you still don’t have enough.”
    Medicine: Young children are a lot more susceptible to getting sick than adults, so we need to be prepared for this. On this topic, I try to keep a healthy stock of herbals and over the counter meds just in case.

    Rehearse – It is hard to rehearse for shtf or a natural disaster with young kids but you can come close with a camping trip. You first choice will always be “bugging in” or staying home with small children, but like we said earlier, that may not be possible and you might be forced to bug out. Go on an overnight camping trip with your emergency survival kit / bug out bag and what you can pack in the car in five minutes or less. While this might not be the perfect rehearsal for emergency survival, it will give you an idea of things you are missing for you and your family. Plus it will be a nice enjoyable time in the woods with your family.

    OLDER CHILDREN

    While you might think you don’t need to do as much to prepare your older children for Survival Family Bug Out surviving a disaster, this is simply not true. Survival might not be something they’ve ever thought about, so your first job is to get them thinking about it. Instead of packing a bug out bag for them, help them pack one for themselves. Explain to them what they need in it and why. Make sure not to instill fear in them while doing so, because this won’t help. Instead, by talking with them sensitively and realistically about possible disasters and helping them prepare themselves, you can give your children a sense of power and also instill valuable lifelong lesson that they might someday pass on to their own families.
    GET THEM OUTDOORS. Exposing children to nature is one of the best ways to teach them about survival, in a natural and fun way. Get them off the couch and away from the video games. Here are some ideas for what to do instead: Take them hiking or camping, Teach them how to garden, fish or hunt, Show them how to start a fire (once they are mature enough to handle it), Get them involved in Boy Scouts/Girl Scouts,Brownies/Guides,Local cadet core.Teach them the basics of cooking! Sign up for a local survival or emergency preparedness course, Build a “Lean To” shelter or a snow shelter.
    Most importantly, make it fun, and this way they will learn skills that they can use not only in a Boy Scouts Survival Training Putting Up a Tent disaster, but for their whole lives.

    While we all hate to think about anything bad ever happening to our children, we need to prepare ourselves so that if something bad does happen, we can rest easy knowing that we have done everything we can to keep them safe. We hope these tips will help you to find a starting point for thinking about survival preparedness for your own Survival Family.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #3305
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    The main killer of children and old is dehydration from diarrhea, without treatment or clean drinking water this is a big concern. What do you have in your bag for it how many doses? what do you do when it runs out?

    Simple charcoal ( activated is better) will clog the back side and help with cleaning ones system, just dont use chemically treated wood.

    children make noise, you will need to enact a quiet signal and have it instantly followed or you jeopardize everyone in your group. You only move as fast as slowest member of your group. your only as invisible as your worst/noisiest person.

    when walking in a group or trail i know families like to group up, in a SHFT situation spacing is a life saver if running into shoot first ask second types.

    the things we now take as personal space and privacy are things that will potentially get you killed ie in need to go pee and no one watching. i like my own room. personal space become a premium most cant afford better to practice before so it does not become an issue.

    #3319
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Blue berries, starchy foods such as potatoes and Chamomile tea can help as well.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #3663
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Agree with Namelus, children especially very young dehydrate very easy, so think about causes for that and try to stop it to induce dehydration (diarrhea, vomiting).
    Bad food, bad water and poor hygiene are things to think about here.
    And yes, most sensitive are very young and very old, in another words weak ones. Remember that when SHTF small things can cause problems that at the end can kill you.

    #7231
    Profile photo of Mottmfly
    Mottmfly
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Thank you for this post. I have twin 19 month olds and I didn’t think about what to do for diarrhea as a mode of dehydration. I’ll look into activated charcoal.

    One of the responses included a “quiet” signal. I’ll try to enact that but at this age I’m not sure how that will fly.

    Thanks again,

    Mott

    #7245
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Mott I am a mom of two here is something to look into as well, might be easier to get into the twins then activated charcoal. Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS) You can find recipes online for making at home as well but here is a name brand for stand bys.

    http://pedialyte.com/

    We have this brand here in Canada, which leads me to believe you guys in the states likely have it as well.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #7247
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    A child with diarrhoea should receive oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution and a daily zinc supplement for 10–14 days. Diarrhoea medicines are generally ineffective and can be harmful.

    Made at home: ORS Solution A special drink for diarrhoea

    Give the child a drink made with 6 level teaspoons of sugar and 1/2 level teaspoon of salt dissolved in 1 litre of clean water.

    Be very careful to mix the correct amounts. Too much sugar can make the diarrhoea worse. Too much salt can be extremely harmful to the child.

    Making the mixture a little too diluted (with more than 1 litre of clean water) is not harmful.

    Diarrhoea usually cures itself in three to four days with rehydration (drinking a lot of liquids). The real danger is the loss of liquid and nutrients from the child’s body, which can cause dehydration and malnutrition.

    A child with diarrhoea should never be given any tablets, antibiotics or other medicines unless prescribed by a trained health worker.

    The best treatment for diarrhoea is to (1) drink lots of liquids and oral rehydration salts (ORS), properly mixed with clean water from a safe source, and (2) take zinc tablets or syrup for 10–14 days.
    ********************************************************************************************************************************
    What is ORS? ORS (oral rehydration salts) is a special combination of dry salts that is mixed with safe water. It can help replace the fluids lost due to diarrhoea.
    ****************************************************************************************************************************
    When should ORS be used? When a child has three or more loose stools in a day, begin to give ORS. In addition, for 10–14 days, give children over 6 months of age 20 milligrams of zinc per day (tablet or syrup); give children under 6 months of age 10 milligrams per day (tablet or syrup).
    ***************************************************************************************************************************
    Where can ORS be obtained? In most countries, ORS packets are available from health centres, pharmacies, markets and shops.
    *******************************************************************************************************************************
    How is the ORS drink prepared?
    Put the contents of the ORS packet in a clean container. Check the packet for directions and add the correct amount of clean water. Too little water could make the diarrhoea worse.
    Add water only.

    Do not add ORS to milk, soup, fruit juice or soft drinks. Do not add sugar.
    Stir well, and feed it to the child from a clean cup. Do not use a bottle.
    *******************************************************************************************************************************
    How much ORS drink to give?
    Encourage the child to drink as much as possible.

    A child under the age of 2 years needs at least 1/4 to 1/2 of a large (250-millilitre) cup of the ORS drink after each watery stool.

    A child aged 2 years or older needs at least 1/2 to 1 whole large (250-millilitre) cup of the ORS drink after each watery stool.
    ********************************************************************************************************************************
    What if ORS is not available?
    Give the child a drink made with 6 level teaspoons of sugar and 1/2 level teaspoon of salt dissolved in 1 litre of clean water.

    Be very careful to mix the correct amounts. Too much sugar can make the diarrhoea worse. Too much salt can be extremely harmful to the child.
    Making the mixture a little too diluted (with more than 1 litre of clean water) is not harmful

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #7249
    Profile photo of Mottmfly
    Mottmfly
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Thank you Gypsy. We have a few bottles of Pedialyte but I’ll put a case or two into the plan.

    Appreciate the info!

    Mott

    #7255
    Profile photo of Mottmfly
    Mottmfly
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Printing this out.

    Thanks!

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