Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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  • #34728
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    For the cities.

    Imagine that.

    http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/09fde45a-8053-11e4-9907-00144feabdc0.html#slide0

    Historically correct even.

    #34733
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    You are correct that in economic downturns many do go to urban areas. Even in good times most people go to urban areas. I think the US population is now 80% urban/suburban. Rural areas are barely holding their own population-wise and many areas are seeing actual population declines. We’ve had this discussion about young people and immigrants heading to the cities. The key word here is “downturn”. Come a collapse, people will not be going to the cities. Spain has not collapsed. It still has a functioning govt and infrastructure. They are in a downturn and what little economic opportunity exists is going to be found in urban areas.

    #34734
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    The situation remains the same, Rhodesia collapsed, the people went to the cities. The farms aren’t safe, farmers are still being murdered for their farms.
    South Africa is collapsing, people are still heading to the cities.
    The same farm murders happen in SA, there is a safety in numbers and one has to get goods and services somewhere.

    The lone farmers/families are targeted, same as elsewhere.

    #34735
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    The younger people all want to live in little neat burbs. Their education in college adapts them to communal living and finding friends to share expenses. Old age communities around here start at age 55. They put them out in the country now.

    #34736
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    When Communism collapsed in Russia , and a real economy was put into place , created literally 100’s of ghost towns , because all the small villages emptied out into the cities , as the cities are the only place where jobs are .

    #34740
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    85% of the UK population now lives in cities, I suppose that’s where the work is, people here either travel 60 miles a day to work or if they work locally its all part time(less than 16 hours per week), Devon is the highest priced place for housing outside London but is a low wage/ high unemployment area. mind you if everyone else were to leave here and move to the city you wont hear me complaining!!!

    British Survivalist.

    #34742
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Come a collapse in the US, I sure hope folks go to the cities then rather than flee to the countryside. Not sure what they’re going to eat or where their water or heat will come from when the infrastructure ceases to function.

    I’m not sure any of the examples provided represent a true collapse. Those places still had functioning infrastructure, even if not fully reliable or efficient, and they still had functioning central govts even if they were corrupt and inefficient. To me collapse includes a failure of the infrastructure and an absence of a functioning central govt.

    #34744
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>MountainBiker wrote:</div>Come a collapse in the US, I sure hope folks go to the cities then rather than flee to the countryside. Not sure what they’re going to eat or where their water or heat will come from when the infrastructure ceases to function.

    I don’t think anyone is thinking of that when they move to a city, I’m sure its all about getting a good job, well paid, and all those nifty little ELECTRICAL gadgets they are going to buy to make their little lives so wonderful and entertaining.

    British Survivalist.

    #34746
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MtB,
    I think an economic collapse in the US would not create a failure of government, probably more government. More limits and restrictions on everything. High crime rates & riots, seizure of savings & assets. Fewer cops and fireman.

    #34747
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    an economic collapse would affect any government, yours or mine, they can only function by paying for stuff with your taxes and mine. no money no influence, it takes money to grease the cogs!!!

    British Survivalist.

    #34749
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    For a lot of people moving to a city is about the ease of getting welfare benes and services. The food bank here is small and stretched to the limit. To get to Social services may require a two hour bus ride. There have been instances of the county giving low income families houses to live in while they work a minimum wage job. It doesn’t work out, they leave. There are better jobs but not enough people who can afford to live in the area, its too expensive. People are already gravitating to larger cities. In an economic collapse it will speed up. Only the wealthy will live outside the cities eventually in second homes and hobby farms or in retirement villages. The Guaranteed Retired Pensioned Invested the check is in the mail folks. Alongside the hunters preppers survivalists homesteaders and gun owners who know the cities are wastelands and won’t have anything to do with them. Fun and friction all around as everyone protects his turf.

    #34751
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    only for the ones that survive, in an economic collapse it’ll be whether someone can feed themselves and their families or not. banks will shut, welfare checks and pensions wont be paid, less food in the shops.you wont be able to travel if you haven’t got the money for the bus, the train or the fuel to put in your own vehicle if you can still afford to run one. all the government services will be pared to the bone, maybe refuse wont even be collected, roads wont be repaired and drains wont be cleared. how long before the whole system grinds to a halt??

    British Survivalist.

    #34753
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>lonewolf wrote:</div>only for the ones that survive, in an economic collapse it’ll be whether someone can feed themselves and their families or not. banks will shut, welfare checks and pensions wont be paid, less food in the shops.you wont be able to travel if you haven’t got the money for the bus, the train or the fuel to put in your own vehicle if you can still afford to run one. all the government services will be pared to the bone, maybe refuse wont even be collected, roads wont be repaired and drains wont be cleared. how long before the whole system grinds to a halt??

    Without electronic transfer of funds….. minutes.

    #34754
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    for most sheeple that’s it, the end of the world as far as they are concerned, oh dear, they cant buy their “coffee to go”….might as well be dead then!!!!

    British Survivalist.

    #34756
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I think the differences amongst us here are the degree of what we consider a downturn vs a collapse. When others switch to using the word collapse, I am still calling those circumstances a downturn.

    Ignoring the semantics of how bad it has to be to be considered a collapse, maybe we should be paying attention more to conditions in South Africa and how people are adjusting to what to some of us looks like that country slowly unraveling a little at a time. Yes it has become dangerous for farmers and others living in the countryside there, but what would the trigger points be for conditions to be even worse in their urban areas? Leopard has shared articles about the risk of grid collapse and areas running out of water. That’s pretty serious stuff but are the urban areas finding ways to adjust to even that should the outages grow longer and longer? She has also shared a lot about the high crime rates and level of violence and some of the steps people take there to protect themselves. She is already living in one of the potential futures others of us talk about maybe happening someday.

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