Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #43745
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Pretty good article – it’s good to get a basics refresher now and again. We get so caught up with other things, the fundamentals go ignored… I’m guilty of it, same as anyone else.

    Good point, here:

    Here is the bottom line: If you are going the route of the lone wolf or secret squirrel isolated from any community, then you are already dead. You might as well hand your food and supplies over to someone else with a better fighting chance. The lone wolf methodology is the worst possible strategy for survival. And if you look at almost every collapse scenario in history from Argentina to Bosnia to the Great Depression, it is always the people with strong community who end up surviving.

    Worth the read…

    http://www.alt-market.com/articles/2690-economic-crisis-how-you-can-prepare-over-the-next-six-months

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #43759
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good article. The not going it alone part is why we bought our place in a small hamlet. I did not want to be isolated. Last week some newer folks in town invited us over for dinner. At one point in the conversation we were talking about the drug problem that every community faces, and I commented that though crime rates are very low here, drugs are behind most of it in this area…..convenience store robberies, house breaks etc. They said they don’t worry about that being how isolated their house is. All of you here know what I was thinking, but I didn’t say it being I had already sized them up as nice folks but utterly clueless on SHTF matters. No useful skills that I could discern either.

    Personally I don’t know how to just bring up the topic of prepping without somehow becoming the crazy guy, being that is what most folks think of preppers. Instead, what I have done is establish myself as a hard worker, a neighbor/friend who helps where and as I can, and someone with some useful skills. At the same time I have made mental notes of skill sets that various neighbors have.

    #43763
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Finding a doctor willing to do assisted suicide might be tad bit better than feeding a neurosurgeon who generally is a specialist. By the end of three weeks without food most druggies will be ready for the reaper. As for telling people you have skills I would tell them you have only one – killing woodchucks at 400 yards.

    #43764
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    There is a new book out. The Knowledge, how to rebuild your world from scratch by Lewis Dartnell

    He’s a scientist. If that qualifies him to be a survivor, I don’t know. In the end our society is split into the haves and have nots. If we have certain things we are obviously better off. Not having those things will make quite a few people hangry. That’s life. With all the tech around its still not very different from 200 years ago or 10,000 years ago.

    #43767
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    In this case you could couch the subject using specific known events like power outages, and being snowed in for a couple of days. A week with no power & no heat can change your perspective. Beyond that they probably need to discover their own frailty.

    You might help them with the idea they have about isolation equating to safety. A low crime rate is not the same as no crime, and being alone where no one can see or hear you does not make you safer. I’m sure you could find a diplomatic way to explain to them reality.

    #43768
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Isolation is good and bad, with no one to hear your screams….
    The number of murder/rapes in the countryside during shtf events is deplorable.

    But basically, as a good neighbor, remind them that the snow does fall, trucks don’t always arrive, bad things happen.

    My home town never had a tornado hit, until it did.
    Blizzard of ’81?
    Denver in ’94?
    People run/slide off the road.

    Without skills? Trainable.
    Invite them to the home canning class where everyone goes home with a couple jars of homemade soup. For those days when they don’t have time to cook/emergencies.

    Start slow, they may end up your best help.

    #43769
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    74, I have seized opportunities as appropriate to test the waters so to speak looking to see if the person might be receptive to carrying the conversation further but they rarely do. Usually the issue is power outages where I’ll say something to the effect of it not being a big deal, we have heat (wood stove), water (hand pump on well), and septic hoping it might spark something more than they should buy a generator. If I remind them that home generators are really only designed for short term events, then I know for sure if they are receptive depending upon whether they can conceive of an outage greater than a few hours. They rarely can. The other thing I do when giving away the bounty from my garden or giving folks my homemade bread (bakery quality if I do say so myself) or am canning or otherwise preserving stuff from the garden is how great it feels to be able to fend for myself in this manner, looking to see what kind of reaction I get.

    The isolated folks I referred to are at the end of a dead end road on the side of the mountain with no neighbors in sight, wealthy folks retired here from NYC with quite the nice place, views of my little valley and all. The road ends with the driveway to their house (which is fairly close to the road and totally visible) and the gate to an estate of a mega millionaire if not billionaire. Most folks around here probably don’t know their home is there but everyone knows that estate is there, and I can well imagine that estate being targeted post-SHTF on the assumption it is good pickings. Druggies aren’t going to go up that road looking to rob that estate now because even the dumb ones must know that there would be some form of security, but post-SHTF is an entirely different story. If we get to know those folks better I will try to help them along, but I didn’t detect even a hint of awareness last week at dinner.

    #43776
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    It’s a constant struggle to see if people are paying attention. Spoke to a neighbor about what to do if there is a major power outage to feel him out. His response was he would go to a Holiday Inn until the power came back on. I asked what if the hotel did not have power. He shrugged and said that “they” would take care of it. Could not define who they were, but was sure they would take care of it.

    Guess I wont get much help from him during a SHTF scenario. Depressing that so many are clueless about the danger that lurks around the corner.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 9 months ago by Profile photo of Roadracer Roadracer.
    #43779
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    I know, I know. It’s really a waste of energy and just creates barriers. The large estate is definitely a magnet. So after it is looted and the bad guys runout of food up there, where are they going to go?

    #43780
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    MB, Road, 74…

    Spoke with my best friend the other day. We’ve drifted nearer and father over the years, but we’re still best friends – been that way since we were both 16…

    His biggest worry is that sh*t will go down while he’s away. He works for an energy company and is gone 2 weeks out of every 4. I told him his family had a place reserved here on the Doomstead, no questions asked.

    But, to show the mindset of folks – and no disparaging my best friend intended – but the following took place between me and him:

    “Do you have a rifle of military usefulness?”
    “No, but I’ve got a couple shotguns.”
    “You should really invest in a rifle of military usefulness.”
    “What can that do that my shotguns won’t?”

    My best friend was Air Force. He wasn’t a dirt monkey or a dogface. Still, his comment took me aback.

    My reply:

    “Shotguns have their place, but a rifle of military usefulness has no equal. Shotguns are only good to 50 yards (meters). With slugs, you can double that to 100 yards (meters). But that’s about it. With the 30 calibers, one shot can smash an engine block. Can engage targets over 800 yards (meters) away if you’re good enough to hit. One shot can damn near cut a man in half. My advice is to acquire a rifle of military usefulness, several dozen mags and at least a couple thousand rounds of good ammo.”

    You cannot automatically assume someone’s mindset will match your own, their knowledge will match yours, their awareness… I talked about how dire our economic situation was, and he was almost oblivious to it. But he was acutely aware of what will happen when sh*t goes sideways. I told him he should have at least a few weeks of food and water set back, and he said “Where would I put it?”… my answer was “Wherever you can find a space.” If he and his family had to abandon their digs quickly, there’s no way he could bring it all, but that’s a choice you have to make – ditch your stocks for a more secure location, or sit on your food and defend as best you can…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #43781
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “You cannot automatically assume someone’s mindset will match your own”
    This made me laugh a little, hasn’t happened in 60 years. But I agree with your post. I have a similar circumstance with a local friend. He doesn’t want to talk about it even though it’s obvious he’s prepping. Only has one shotgun, doesn’t want to practice. He’s surrounded by neighbors in a suburban area and wants to stay in place. I tried to help him see things differently and it went nowhere. If/when it turns to lawlessness I expect him to come running, well if he makes it anyway.

    #43784
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    The herd animals always stick together and for that matter die together as well. In some instances its a strategy that works and in others the odds are not in your favor. I’ve been in a similar situation before and declined an invitation to join a primitive living survival group. But I’m more connected to my own lifestyle. Alas the technology today is as dangerous as it is useful. I understand it better than I do living in a tepee. Visiting the third world in ok for a while. I just don’t envision living there permanently.

    #43785
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    The herd animals always stick together and for that matter die together as well. In some instances its a strategy that works and in others the odds are not in your favor. I’ve been in a similar situation before and declined an invitation to join a primitive living survival group. But I’m more connected to my own lifestyle. Alas the technology today is as dangerous as it is useful. I understand it better than I do living in a tepee. Visiting the third world in ok for a while. I just don’t envision living there permanently.

    I know… wall tents are much more comfortable. :)

    Was thinking if we have ‘overflow’ here on the Doomstead. A sturdy wall tent made of Sunforger canvas and a smallish cast iron potbelly stove would be a pretty fair semi-permanent setup… especially if you have the extreme cold weather liner for the tent. It wouldn’t be 21st century living… wouldn’t even really be 20th century living… late 19th century? Sure. Potbelly stove, oil lamps, feather pillows, wool blankets and down comforters? That there is right cozy… I wouldn’t mind that at all.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #43787
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Yesterday The folks across the way had an end of summer cookout and had me bring over my cider press to use as part of the party. Early on before most of the folks got there one of the daughters said something to me about I can make cider too, and from my own trees? She lives a couple towns over and had never been over to my place, but she knew I had a big garden and had been supplying the neighborhood this summer, and she knew I made bread, and so the cider just added to the list of what I did. I seized the opportunity to hopefully plant a seed by just responding “If the world falls apart it’ll be good to know how to do some things.” When the cider making began, folks were a little apprehensive about trying it, but then kids jumped in asking if they could help and began feeding in the apples and operating the crank. Then the grandmother to several of them starting helping with the bottling, and soon enough various others came over to take a turn feeding apples, operating the crank, doing the actual press, or doing the bottling. A few seemed to be pleasantly surprised at how simple it all was. I got to talk to folks about how to pasteurize it if they want it to last a long time vs just letting it turn to vinegar. Most of the cider went home with people, with reminders that I want the glass jars back. Whenever I learn how to do something new and useful it feels empowering and I think I can learn to do even more. That’s what I’m hoping a few of those folks went away with.

    #43788
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Malgus,
    I was in a few wall tents set up with a raised wooden floors. It made the tents much more livable then a tent with a fabric floor. Just a thought.

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 9 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
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