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  • #19507
    Profile photo of lci115lewis
    lci115lewis
    Survivalist
    member3

    Last week I picked up a duct knife to give it a try. Fixed 6″ blade, one side is serrated the other is plain and came out of the box just about sharp enough to shave with (shaved the hair on the back of my hand easily enough, don’t know if I would trust it enough to really shave anything though). The brand/model I picked up from Home Despot is the Malco DK6 (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Malco-Duct-Knife-with-Serrated-Edge-DK6STS/202223126), unspecified type of stainless steel. I got this planning to give it a try as a gardening knife. If I like the blade style enough, I plan to “upgrade” to the Klenk version with rosewood grips ( actually the have a number of nice looking utility knives with rosewood incorporated in the grips).

    Anyone have previous experience with duct knives and have any comments on them? Supposedly at least the Malco version has odd blade geometry that can make it hard to sharpen, when it needs resharpening I was intending to reshape it to a more standard edge bevel, probably around 22-25 degrees.

    Rob

    #19543
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    lci – Looks like a nice knife although I have no experience with it. You said you wanted it for your garden. It should do well!. Myself, I went to a couple of thrift stores and found a bunch of Henckle serrated steak knifes (some with fat wood handles) and keep a bunch around to do stuff with. friends see them here and there and say ‘You use your STEAK knives in your GARDEN?’

    I sharpen knives. It looks doable. No worries. Enjoy it! I am sure it feels great in the hand.

    #19545
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    It’s hard to tell for sure looking at the picture but it looks like it could have 30+ degree bevel on the cutting edge. That can be good or bad depending on the intended use. If you are going to use it like a machete it is fine but for slicing you might be disappointed. The odd recessed grind down the sides may make it hard to get a 22-25 degree edge on it. Your stone may contact the transition from the spine of the blade to the recessed grind not allowing you to reach 22 degrees. 30 degrees is still sharp enough to cut string and thin rope with. The serrated edge should handle anything heavier than that however it might not be as clean a cut. The blade itself looks pretty sturdy and should hold up well. It would be great for aerating soil and prying up stubborn weeds(wouldn’t be so good for the edge though). I have a putty knife with a very similar handle and it is indeed very comfortable and being rubberized it will provide a slip free grip. The smaller serrated edges are not as easy to sharpen but the larger serrations are no problem. You will just need a tapered round stone. Garden tools take a lot of abuse. A knife that doesn’t make you cry if something happens to it is always good to have. This one looks sturdy and is not overly expensive so I think you did ok. Go take it and give it the what for and see how it holds up. It would make a great review. Better to find out it’s weaknesses now than when you are depending on it.

    #19546
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    They are not bad , just get a good one like a Klein .

    #19581
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    My eldest son carries the Klein brand duct knife on his hip and uses it as an everyday tool. Works great to cut holes in couches and mattresses to make handles to carry them when we are cleaning out a house.

    #19602
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Looks like an awesome knife for using while gardening. Is the serrated part of the blade good enough for cutting some smaller branches?

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #20245
    Profile photo of lci115lewis
    lci115lewis
    Survivalist
    member3

    I will find out this weekend how it works, the Cat’s Claw is getting out of control again and needs trimming, that will be a lot of good abuse to see how well it will hold up. I usually use a utility knife with a disposable blade to cut it off the block fence, so we will see how it does. Plus I will be putting in a corner post for a new pergola tomorrow morning, there will be plenty if ivy to saw through around there.

    I have usually used an old Lee Enfield bayonet for weeding, it started off blunt and is slowly getting polished to an edge. That is a trend I have been noticing with British military accoutrements from the Victorian and Edwardian eras, may be of dubious utility for the professed purpose, but make for excellent gardening tools.

    Rob

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