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  • #30164
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    I used to sit in my great grandmothers kitchen drinking cold ginger beer. The smell of rusks drying in the oven. Even though I was little, I can still remember holding the basket for the eggs. She new when the time was right to pick the fruit from the trees. We ate fresh guava’s and mango’s. Fresh full cream milk every morning. She was always busy in the kitchen. Nothing went to waste.

    Today I need to google for that knowledge. Found this information. Not so sure about the bleach part. Think I would rather use Milton.

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    #30172
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Maybe you would like my recipe for ginger beer!

    http://eatkamloops.org/traditional-ginger-beer/

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    #30178
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks for the posts. It reminded me that I had black walnuts drying at the top of the stairs. This is the 1st year I tried harvesting my black walnuts. Last week I removed the outer hull which was hugely labor intensive but come SHTF we won’t be tossing any food source, so I figured best to try it now. I then rinsed them off, and laid them out on paper towels to dry, but did so upstairs (where we never go except when we have overnight guests) because they have a strong odor to them when wet. And then I forgot they were there. Still not dry so I have them in front of the wood stove now. Black walnuts are incredibly hard to break open so that’ll be a learning experience too when I get to that step.

    #30198
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Ah ! Thank you C. It’s really a traditional recipe. Think I will try yours a week before Christmas. I will also ask my grandmother how her mother used to make it. I can remember being asked to check if the raisins are floating in the big white cast iron bucket. It was poured out of glass bottles and toward the end of the holiday the last bit definitely had ‘skop’ – a bit of a kick. Modern recipe I found http://whatsforsupper-juno.blogspot.com/2007/06/old-fashioned-home-made-ginger-beer.html

    I love walnuts, but do not get to eat them often. It sounds interesting. I think they must be able to breath a bit if you store them long term. We used to crack open pecan nuts by putting two in your hand and giving them a squeeze. We also get macadamia nuts and cashew nuts. I had a almond tree in my garden in the Cape province. I know that you need to do your homework before harvesting some nuts – as the outside fruit can be poisonous sometimes.
    We pay a lot of money for a small packet of nuts here…

    I think I am going to try and grow lentils. http://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-lentils-pots-96545.html

    #30200
    Profile photo of Ron S
    Ron S
    Survivalist
    member6

    MountainBiker: I have harvested Black Walnuts and you are correct, they are hard. What we do is to set them aside for several months until the green outer husks turn black. After they turn black, lay down old newspapers or some kind of sheeting and then tap them with a hammer. the outer husks will turn to powder but will come off easily. Then lay the walnut on a vise or other solid surface(we use a piece of railroad rail ) and then break the walnut with the hammer. You can dig the meat out with a nail or a nutpick. Yep, very labor intensive, but so worth it. By the way, when the nuts are still green, you can rub the green husks over a scratch in your furniture and conceal the scratch. If you do try that, I would suggest you try it first in an inconspicous place to see if it meets with you or your significant others approval. Ron S

    #30201
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    LOL Ron S, where were you when I needed you last week struggling to get the green outer husks off? Next year I’ll do it your way. And yes the natural dyes that come off them is pretty strong.

    Leopard, I wish I had paid attention to my grandmother’s cooking when I was a kid. She had an old cast iron stove that burned kerosene and did everything from scratch. She grew up on a farm in a remote part of the Gaspe region of Quebec (where the St. Lawrence River enters the ocean), a place where you had to be self sufficient to survive. More important than cooking was her knowledge of home remedies. We only went to the doctor or the hospital for stitches, surgery, and vaccinations, and I suspect she could have handled the stitches if my mother had let her.

    #30214
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Everyone should learn how to place a few good stitches or two…or three. SHTF time will come in very handy. Not just on humans, but for livestock as well. I have taught some of the guys by having them practice using fruit roll-ups (unrolled) – best approximation of skin for fine stitches I’ve been able to figure/use- a piece of deer with the hide still on for deeper wounds.

    MB – we place the walnuts in a burlap sack a it less than 3/4 full and drive the truck over it.

    #30215
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Oh and MB we crack the shells open easily with this

    #30219
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>tweva wrote:</div>Oh and MB we crack the shells open easily with this

    There wasn’t anything there when I clicked on it.

    I have heard of the driving over them technique. Doesn’t that make a mess of the nuts themselves when the shells break apart that way? I envision having to pick little pieces of shell out of the nuts.

    #30220
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    MB sorry – long day
    We drive over them to remove husks. Then you remove the hull from the shell (shells don’t generally break even run over by truck) Use this nutcracker (works the best of all we first tried) to crack shell. Thing is – it is very difficult to get a full, intact piece of black walnut meat out of the shell. Now matter how careful. Just so you know and don’t think it is only you when it comes time to pick em. Tedious job but if you do with someone else it keeps hands busy while talking. I use a hoof pick (clean) cause I can hold the handle easier and it goes quicker than a regular nutpicker or nail. Can get more omph behind it. Hoof picks at local coop for cheap. Maybe because they are oilier than english walnuts. Then we put them in mesh bags (like onions come in – can get from uline) and hang them up to dry out.

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    #30224
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    MB – oh I forgot – if you can find an old corn sheller that works at antique store – they also work to remove the hull if you don’t wanna run over them! HTH My old sheller died long time ago.

    #30226
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks tweva. One of those heavy duty nutcrackers is what I have in mind. I’m thinking of trying Ron’s suggestion of letting the outer husk dry up completely first if it comes off easy that way like he says. Next year. Already did it the hard way this year.

    #30233
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Well, give it a try but we were taught not to leave the hulls on long to get the husk/hull off because they will mold. This is what the nutgrowers org says ‘If black walnuts are left in the hull/husk (the softer, green to brown outer shell) they will mold. The hull needs to be removed. If you leave them in the hull too long after they fall off of the tree, they will transfer color and flavor to the nut meat. You need to remove the hulls as soon as possible. ‘ This from Iowa State: ‘ The nuts should be hulled immediately after they have been harvested. If the hulls are allowed to remain on for any length of time, the juice in the hull will discolor the nut meats and make them strong tasting. The stain also discolors skin, clothing,concrete, and anything else that it touches. There are various ways and devices to hull walnuts — a cement mixer, corn sheller,automobile wheel, and squirrel cage are possibilities. Hulls can also be removed by stomping the nuts under foot or pounding with a hammer. After hulling, thoroughly wash the nuts to remove hull debris and juices. Small quantities can be washed in a large bucket or tub. At this time, the good nuts can be sorted from the bad ones. Unfilled nuts float while filled nuts sink. (Rubber gloves should be worn when hulling and cleaning to prevent staining of the hands.)’ After washing and sorting, allow the nuts to dry for two or three weeks. An excellent way to dry nuts is on a wire screen. Spread the nuts in shallow layers (no more than three nuts deep)and dry them in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area. A shed or garage is usually a good place to dry walnuts.’

    My grandfather would never let us waste even a day (although we tried :) ) after we collected them to start husking em. Can still hear the lecture abt it.

    But, maybe if you keep an eye on them as they dry in the hull it’d be ok – don’t know as wasn’t taught that way. Just to let you know.

    #30235
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks for the ginger beer recipes! Loved Bundaberg Ginger Beer when I visited ‘me Mum’ in Australia…and had a recipe from a lady in the Glasshouse Mountains which I lost during one of our many moves. It had yellow Sultana raisins in it which is all I remember, and she fermented it under her Queensland cottage so nothing would get ruined when a bottle or two popped. I want to try some of these recipes!

    BTW We are blessed with 4 bearing native pecan trees on our tiny lot. Shade, tasty food, plus possible survival meat from the many fat squirrels should the occasion arise ;). I also found a huge Burr Oak not far from here with equally huge acorns. Harvested and ate some last year just to learn–they are excellent sources of carbs and fats. Not especially flavorful, a mix of faint nut/mushroom flavor after leaching. Great in multi grain breads, or with corn meal in Apache Pancakes. And I dried some of the chopped, leached acorns for later use.

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