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  • #37706
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Who on here works on their driving technique as a ‘survival skill’…? I know I do. Understanding and exploiting the capabilities of your vehicle is often overlooked I think… How do you train and why?

    A great example of skill here…

    #37707
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I love this video. Under all that mud there has to be some solid ground. An off road vehicle could be beneficial when leaving the highway for a distant road. Fence cutting tools will be essential for getting out of the corridor.

    #37709
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’m impressed. If the video was shot in the Spring I might have guessed that there was still frozen ground that the tires were gripping onto under the layer of mud but this is in the autumn. Regardless, I haven’t practiced off road driving like that. Maybe I’ll inadvertently get the opportunity as mud season will be upon us in the weeks ahead when winter starts easing into Spring. The frost beneath dirt roads is well deeper than normal due to the relentless cold this winter. That means more mud as the top layers defrost and the ground is still frozen beneath.

    #37710
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Arnold’s Unimog. Only $250k

    I’ve seen unimogs used for camping out in Arizona. Great ground clearance. I doubt you’ll ever get high centered. They have all the capabilities you could ever want in an offroad vehicle or bugout machine. From time to time I see them sold as surplus but the prices are low so they must have already been pretty well beaten to death. I’ve never seen one used as a log skidder. I would think a little light at only 4-5 tons. It seems like in the video they were using the mud as a friction reducer to make it easier. The other video of them loading the mog into the truck was funny as hell. Yes you can…. but why lol. Ramps are so much easier.

    #37717
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    here is another one , I could see how evasion driving courses would be good also .

    #37720
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Tolik… that was heroic. The blackest smoke I’ve ever seen come out of a diesel. He better give the beast an oil change after that.

    #37722
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Right on Toby C. Drive all kinds of ‘vehicles.’ I’m still surprised at how many people I meet can’t drive via manual transmission. I’ve learned a lot driving (motor boats, motorcycle, snowmobiles, canoe, ATVs) in wilds of Alaska …all terrain…skills could be helpful in SHTF. Learn how to maintain them/trouble shoot.

    In the Walking Dead they’re always repairing vehicles and drive in all conditions. Nothing like zombies to speed up car repairs or find one that’s working. Basic mechanic skills are invaluable.

    #37725
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    They haven’t addressed old varnished gas yet. It clogs everything after a few years. Nothing like cleaning an old carb to learn about that problem.

    #37759
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Toby that is a very good point. I grew up in the south and had never dealt with ice and snow. When I was 19 I moved to Oklahoma. The first good snow we had I went to the walmart parking lot at about 2 am (this was before they were 24 hrs). I spent about an hour driving and braking on the snow and ice, putting myself into spins and what not. I will admit it was initially for fun but it payed off. About a week later i was in my delivery truck which had about 8k lbs of batteries in it and lost traction coming down a long gentle hill leading to a stop light. I started honking my horn and managed to keep the truck from turning sidways and flipping. About the time I got to the red light i got the truck straightened out and drifted into the intersection. People heard me honking and had not proceeded when their light turned green. I waved and just kept right on driving lol. Practice always helps.

    #37767
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Matt76 , same here in the respect that I grew up in Arizona , when I first moved to Maine for a couple of years , it was a learning curve . But I was warned by the locals ahead of time , not to be in a hurry and to start stopping long before I thought that I needed to .

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