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  • #2183
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    I go very often trough the hypothetical SHTF scenarios in my mind, and based to that I am trying to go trough the problems.
    After that I do what you could call drills.
    For example, I check how quickly I could go on my foot from my home to BOL if regular road-way would be blocked, and I need to use some alternative way, or I what are the best places to meet with family members if SHTF and we are not together.
    Some of this stuff goes simply hypothetical, other goes and end up like nice but hard hiking trip trough the woods.
    Point is that every time I learned something new, or find out something more useful, for example some shortcut, or smarter idea for hidden stash or similar.
    Important thing is that from my experience things are never fold out as you planned it, so at the some point you will be forced to improvise.
    What kind of drills you do?

    #2228
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    This is a great idea! I don’t do anything like that, now, but I certainly will going forward. I just need to think of what ones would be realistic for my current situation, but it sounds like a very good exercise. Thanks!

    #3096
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    In about a months time we will begin our drills, that lead up to going off grid from june to sept.Our run up till then is packing preps, choosing stash areas and route planning.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #3246
    Scylla
    Scylla
    Survivalist
    member1

    You don’t need to go out and about to begin practical drills: Use your head! Create possible scenarios in your head and then work through the solution. Then, when you have the opportunity, take it outside and actually go through the drill you created earlier. The bottom line is: Think! Then, put your thought(s) into action. Repeat the real-life drill often enough and it becomes a part of your mental language: You find yourself in a given situation, you already have thought it through and practiced, practiced the solution, so when the real problem arises, you have the solution down pat and can initiate and carry it out PROMPTLY!

    Scylla

    “Ultimately, our history is written in steel
    and I fear we may have forgotten the language.”

    #5644
    vettom
    vettom
    Survivalist
    member2

    I move through my house with lights off and snap caps in my tactical shotgun or pistols with night sights. I practice this routinely so it is a “memory” thing. I have had my alarm go off and was “instinctual” in moving to sweep the house. So for me it keeps my low light training for shooting current in my realm and if I am confronted it will be a instinctual reaction. Now I have no children in the house so, some scenarios for me are different than may be for others.
    I routinely carry (CCW) and this helps me to be alert and what is around me also that goes back to my training scenarios.

    #5780
    danzak44
    danzak44
    Veteran
    member1

    It’s kind of hard to walk from Seattle to Ft Worth. We think that would be the worst case scenario for us to handle if the SHTF. Being truck drivers, it’s hard to train for any situation, but we do talk about scenarios and what would we do or how we can make things better for us. We just have to be alert and hope that we can get a jump on what ever happens.

    Always live for today!

    #5872
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    range patrol. im in the mountains so gear is as follows…
    1; jungle issue combat boots,waterproof cord lace, thick cotton socks.
    2; thermal johns and top, covered by combat pants and jacket.
    3;bellaclava, l.e.d. headlamp, insulated kevlar gloves, boot wraps,
    4; ?two foot bayonette as a side knife, tactical 5 inch knife on my chest, mossberg 10-22, 14 shot longs.
    5; left side pocket has bear bangers, flares, and whistle,
    6; right side pocket has compass, gps, range finder, and elevation limiter.
    7; chest pockets hold camera, cell phone, mirror, map, note pad, and ribbon for marking.
    8; back pack is also jungle issue combat, with first aid, water purification and filter, two days food and water, second change of clothes, basic hygene and toiletry’s, snares and fishing kit, 50ft para cord, fire starting kit, poncho, small wool blanket, small tin of hooks and eyelets, sewing kit, canvas repare kit, portable mess kit.

    at first my bag had more stuff but it weaghed 100 pounds..i barely made 5 miles. i eventually downsized so the bag now weaghs 40 pounds.there abouts.
    once i got the bag to a managable size i set my goal to be exhausted before i come back. didnt take long at first, but i kept at it. my health increased quickly. and soon i was up to 60 pounds {carry extra water to place at posts along the way}. and in the extreme i tried humping 150 pounds in my bag..uhg…no i cant do that, now i know.
    with a managable pack and health tuned up, now i do some drills. carry rifle in both hands never to point at any thing or anyone, forever checking over my safety, feeling the weaght movements, while walking or jogging. practicing crawling and rolling with bag and rifle, {my dog dont get that part}. i got used to it fast.

    i would presume that invaders come to the claim for our goods, id gear up for that responce and try to circle the area undetected, then return to camp looking for the invaders, doesnt sound like much but every noise, smell, disturbance must be checked out. that and im training my dog he is so dam friendly….

    at every opportunity i try new drills, the R.C.M.P. showed up at out camp, seemed a couple lady’s are missing and lost in the river valley. instantly we geared up to escort the officer down the valley. i put my dog on a lead and he led the way.. some time later we made it to the river, we did a basic grid pattern for scent, and soon Dodge was barking, he found the lady’s. a helicopter was called in, my dog was awesome… helicopter come down, picked them up and we completed a general search of the area, found a destroyed dingy and some gear, seems the girls were drinking and floating down the river. another half kilometer down the river is a canyon and deadly falls.
    with deed done we escort the officer back up to camp… Dodge taught me a lesson that day, the teacher must always be open to learning.

    as a home drill ill say… S.H.T.F. grab a bag !
    dressing was the first thing i looked for, durable, tight knit or weeve, cloths in good condition, properly layered and secure {pockets done up, laces correct, good tuck and fold}, and to be ready in a timely fashion.

    id say to my kids, control your breathing, feel your whole system, and try to concentrate now…and thats when i pour cold water on them. oh ya…me too. big shock. with wet cloths we now go into our bag and change out.
    and instantly i find out we didnt pack any garbage bags for wet things….

    while on nature walks, i encourage the kids to find animal trails, and droppings. we look at the area and whats in the droppings, bugs or seeds, critters or grass, and figure what kind of animal it is. how old the drop is. the birds and small critters in the area will let you know if theres something close by so i get the kids to always listen for warning calls from animals. just when they get right into it i gotta stop them to check the sky for weather changes, things were going good and i missed the storm moving in on us, they picked on that right away, sharp kids.

    if the kids can one up you, i find they really excell. ill let my ten year old lead the way, if he wants to blaze a trail or folow the path i follow his lead. ill question him as we come to things and his understanding is good. he likes to sit in a bush and watch, for animals and birds, i think he made a connection to nature. its not really a drill but it is teaching me about my son, and building the confidence that comes with drills.

    sometimes i come rolling out of a bush and someone is standing there, usualy a cousin or partner so i dont have to explain, they say “oh its just darin”, but to explain why you do what you do to those who dont understand is near impossable. to them, you should go home, turn on a light switch, get your food from a fridge, turn a tap on for water, flush your toilet, watch T.V. or play video games and leave the bush to industry. i had to laugh when i heard..
    .”i dont understand them white men, they **** in the house and eat outside”

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

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    #5914
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Practical drills are only good way to see how your plans are good in reality, so I simply do a lot of tests of my equipment.
    It can be small and usual thing like long walking or hiking, or several days camping with your stuff.
    It would be bad, but not so rare that man realize that his boots for example sucks for running or squatting and S. is already hit the fan.

    #5922
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Second That Selco. My Moon Boots are great when you’re behind a team of sled dogs, going through snow. Not so fun when you have to walk the TCH in them!! Or trying to climb.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #5945
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    To practice drills to get your home ready for possible attack would be good. Say you are busy working in your vegetable garden and you hear people shouting and screaming. You look down the street and hundreds of people are looting houses. No time to leave. You run into the house. In SA the gate would be locked already, electric fence on.. You start filling the bath with water – in case they try to burn you out. Fire extinguishers ready with pins pulled out. You move furniture to block the windows. Hopefully your vehicle is parked facing the gate but locked away. Hey, you might be shooting your way out or sneak out pretending you are looting with them. Or they might move on realizing they are gonna get killed.
    Getting ready to leave your home to a more safe location. Hopefully very well stocked over very long period of time and far away from nearest city – more than a full tank..location. I look around when ever I drive in any direction. At rivers (what happens upstream that could pollute the water) Places to hide until it is safe to move again. Which road they might block to prevent people from leaving. Interesting fact that all..ok, most airports in SA has got informal settlements right next to them… both sides of the road.

    Then – where ever you might land up for some time. You will have to protect that area, or know when somebody has been there or planning on taking your spot. I’m going to copy an paste the following info from the old Selous Scouts, also used by South African Recces. These technique’s are still being used by game rangers tracking poachers and some farmers that we now train.

    ” First, psychologically and physically prepare for the hunt. You should be in good physical condition with excellent reserves of stamina, alert, reasonably well fed and above all confident in yourself and your men. You may be forced to travel for days under adverse conditions, without food and with little water, at a fast pace and tinder tremendous mental stress. Tracking requires intense concentration, stamina and an eye for detail.
    As you are tracking, look for evidence (track signs) of disturbed grass; bent blades will reveal the direction of travel. The top of the grass will point in the direction the person is walking. If the enemy has passed through after sunrise the dew will be disturbed and a faint darkened area will reveal his trail. Watch for broken spider webs or cobwebs. When examining spoor always keep your head slightly up and look 15 to 20 yards ahead of you. It will enable you to see the spoor better, determine the direction of movement, and keep alert for likely ambush areas, If the terrorist knows or suspects he is being followed, he will try to set you up.

    Be alert, patient, and careful. Watch for rocks that have been overturned. The dark side will be up or you will see the impression on the ground where it once rested. Although mid-day heat will dry the rock quickly, it tells you the terrorist is only hours ahead of you. If you find it in the morning, then he has been moving prior to sunrise. The darker and wetter the rock, the closer your quarry.

    Much of’ tracking means noting what is out of context in nature and realizing the cause. Move from sign to sign and always be sure of your last confirmed sign before you move on to the next. There are, of course, the obvious: footprints in the mud near streams and water holes and along sandy rivers; leaves on plants that have been broken, knocked off, or turned so that the light underside contrasts with the surroundings; scuffed tree bark or mud scraped from passing boots and the impression of rifle butts being used as crutches or canes up steep slopes. Of course, there is the old favorite, blood on the vegetation and trail.

    Watch for discarded ration packages, food tins, and even dropped or discarded documents. U.S. troops in Vietnam were easily tracked, not by recently cut jungle foliage but by their inevitable trail of Kool-Aid packages. Once you have identified the spoor, try to identify the type of foot gear. Often different guerrilla groups wear different type boots. Terrorists in Rhodesia have been killed and captured carrying two or three types of shoes and wearing two or three shirts and pants, at the same time! Make sure the print is not one of your own people or security forces and keep a record of the different type prints you encounter. Plaster impressions, drawings, photos or even a copy of the soles themselves should be on record with local intelligence people. The Rhodesians and South Africans make copies of all terrorist footwear and distribute these drawings to the local population. Village police, hunters, and farmers walking in the bush have often discovered the trail of terrorist gangs who have crossed from Zambia or Mozambique and have alerted the security forces.
    The depth and space of the tracks will also tell you something about your foe. Women take smaller steps, as do heavily laden men. People running will leave more space between tracks and men walking in each other’s tracks will make deeper impressions. Also, they will cause the edges of the tracks to be less distinct. Drag marks could indicate wounded. Once you have identified your particular track, follow it even if the group splits. Sometimes guerrillas will split up or bombshell, until you are left following one set of tracks.”

    #5947
    Profile photo of osagemarine
    osagemarine
    Survivalist
    member3

    Practice moving at night through local area and through the woods/brush. Take turns trying to locate each other by sound. I’ve also made friends with all the local dogs.

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