Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 46 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #28974
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Whirlibird wrote:</div>Look at them carefully, the bullet that just splattered on your chest plate has to go somewhere, and without some form of absorbing layer, those bits end up in your arms and throat.

    Gents, we won’t even consider where they go if you’re sitting.

    armor just became much less romantic.

    Whats the verdict on ballistic shields? Wonder if it would be possible to turn a plate into a buckler or something.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #28978
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirly,
    So you are saying don’t use armor because it better to take a shot in the aorta than the groin, or it’s a waste of time protecting your body because your arms will get it anyway? Don’t use armor plates because the splatter will hit you somewhere else it’s better to take a slug in the chest?

    What are you advocating?

    #29005
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    There is no 100% protection, us armor plates and a large shirt over it. Yes you can get hit in the arm, leg or throat. This has been studied that many in the wars got hit and the splatter hit them in the throat or arms but many didn’t and even the one’s that did had a better change of living.

    But Whirlibird is right on this. Just because you have armor don’t go out thinking you are safe.

    #29026
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>74 wrote:</div>Whirly,<br>
    So you are saying don’t use armor because it better to take a shot in the aorta than the groin, or it’s a waste of time protecting your body because your arms will get it anyway? Don’t use armor plates because the splatter will hit you somewhere else it’s better to take a slug in the chest?

    What are you advocating?

    No, not saying avoid plates, but I am saying to look into plates that have some sort of coating or packaging that traps fragments. I have a couple of trauma plates here that are encased in kevlar or ballistic nylon, they slip into the front pocket of a concealable vest. The way it’s covered, all the little bits and pieces, especially those that might be directed upwards are captured.

    I’m advocating using more than just common sense, and looking ahead a bit.

    Because of the needs and situations we are concerned about, not just getting shot, but infections and injuries that go along with getting shot at.
    It’s one thing to dig a chunk of copper out of your arm/leg right now and go on with your day hardly giving it a thought, kind of like an ingrown toenail. But when there’s no medical care, no antibiotics, that makes this take on a whole new level of seriousness.

    Shirts and such can help, but some form of containment that won’t get torn and carried with the fragments into the wound is a good idea. Death from infection is not a pretty way to go.

    Somewhere around here I have an older picture of a holstered G17 that took a hit right through the soft nylon holster. The jacket fragments and such were easy to find on the xrays and such. But the doctors had a time finding all the holster bits and jeans material that had gotten carried/pushed into the gent’s thigh.

    I confront someone wearing a chicken plate carrier, plates or not I’m going to shoot high or low and end the threat.

    #29028
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>KOS wrote:</div>

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Whirlibird wrote:</div>Look at them carefully, the bullet that just splattered on your chest plate has to go somewhere, and without some form of absorbing layer, those bits end up in your arms and throat.

    Gents, we won’t even consider where they go if you’re sitting.

    armor just became much less romantic.

    Whats the verdict on ballistic shields? Wonder if it would be possible to turn a plate into a buckler or something.

    Shields, convex (or similar) shaped are much better than chicken plates for protection.
    The spatter if there is any, is farther away from the body so therefore a much reduced risk.
    One doesn’t really have to consider any coating or covering except to avoid rust, however I’d recommend truck bedliner on it both to reduce rust, but to avoid damaging other things you may rub or bump against when moving or storing it.
    Concave (jail style) shields are much more difficult to deal with, and less protective from anything at less than the normal 90* as they leave a larger portion exposed from side angles.
    You can hide behind the convex shape.

    30-36″ wide and 40-48″ high is large enough that one can actually get behind and still move around, with ballistic shields at least. With AR plate, it’s a bit heavy for moving with, but for static defense in a hallway or bedroom, I’ll happily take one.
    I have something similar built into my bench here for several reasons, in case I mess up, I don’t toss one out of the shop. In case a customer messes up, I don’t take one lower than my chin. In case of a robbery, I have something to hide behind. In this case, there’s 3/4″ of plywood in front of it (behind also) to stop fragments and hide the plate.

    #29038
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Thanks Whirlibird, that was very educational. Do you know of any more videos about gun shot wounds by doctors? I would be interested in seeing more.

    #29057
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Will see what I can find, and apologize for the gore.
    I forget most aren’t used to it.

    #29058
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    must admit, it caught me off gaurd. wasn’t sure if i was looking a rotten pumpkin or what.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #29061
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Like a lot of things , the best way to avoid it is not to be there in the first place ………………….not possible sometimes , but also something to be said about staying unnoticed .

    #29068
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    What gore? It wasn’t gory at all… but I have had two home births.

    The big thing to know how to manage a gunshot wound is to deal with the bleeding and shock first. The person’s body position when being shot was very important information. I have no idea how someone would find a bullet without modern imaging equipment. Removal of a bullet would be very important and would require professional help. Hopefully, without medical care, the shot would be a through and through. Infection would be a big deal in aftercare.

    I hope, I never have to deal with that kind of wound without professional care. Likely, without professional care the person would die of internal bleeding, shock or infection. My home remedies won’t work. Ionic silver might help stop infection with a through and through shot in a non-vital area of the body as long as no bone was fractured during impact… My advice, don’t get into a fire-fight if you want to live after SHTF.

    #29071
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Like Tolik said staying unnoticed is the best policy. If you can leave an area where there is a lot of shooting then do it. Try your best to avoid a fight. Only fight back if you are cornered and there is no other way out of the area.

    c, on “I have no idea how someone would find a bullet without modern imaging equipment.” I agree, a small .22LR or even a 9mm will not be easy to find. If you get shot with a .22 LR three to four times you may bleed to death slowly. I know for a fact that everyone that owns a .22 rifle thinks that they need to shoot 3 to 4 bullets at a time to stop someone and even then it may not stop the person but there will be no way to find the bullets so they will die slowly.

    So the idea is not to get shot. Just leave the areas were there are a lot of shootings.

    #29081
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    If you read about civil war wounds and medical treatment it will give you an idea of life without modern technology.

    “Approximately two out of every three Civil War wounds treated by surgeons were to the extremities because few soldiers hit in the head, chest or stomach lived long enough to make it back to a field hospital. From a technical point of view, damaged limb bones presented the greatest challenge to surgeons.”

    Whole article: Under the Knife

    http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/17/under-the-knife/?_r=0

    #29082
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    74, do you have any suggestions on books about medical treatment in the civil war?

    74, how many people would even be aware of their body’s position at the time of a shooting to help a caregiver local a bullet? Sounds like a nightmare trying to deal with that kind of injury without imaging equipment.

    Freedom, I could not agree more. If at all possible, I’m going to be long gone before the shooting starts.

    #29083
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “If at all possible, I’m going to be long gone before the shooting starts”. Freedom

    Right back to: Rural Vs.Urban Survival

    http://community.shtfschool.com/forums/topic/discussion-rural-vs-urban-survival/

    #29084
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    C, Not really but you might find this a help: Historian Documents Harsh Realities of Early American Medicine

    https://www.aamc.org/newsroom/reporter/april2014/378182/author.html

    Reporter: What did early American medicine look like?
    Breslaw: Nothing like medicine today. There were no vaccines or antibiotics. There was no way of curing disease, and no way to diagnose what was happening in the body, partly because they didn’t understand what was causing disease. If anything, early American medicine reflects a lot of the folklore today and some of the alternative medical theories that people have. In fact, some of today’s alternative medical theories are an outgrowth of what had been early, prescientific medicine.”

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 46 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.