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  • #42162
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    please post questions and comments to my last blog post Things You Need to Know About Killing here.

    #42182
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    I was only present at two deaths, neither very violent. Selco’s tutorial is an important aspect of survival. Do you want to live? At what cost? What about the lives of those you love? What are you willing to pay, to save theirs?

    It will be hard to stay calm in the face of violence and death. I remember being with my father as he died from a heart attack in a remote area. Yes, I cried a lot after trying to revive him (he came back a few moments, then left forever.)

    I also remember helping neighbors carry their injured son out to the road–he had felled a tree which hit him and crushed his chest. They never called an ambulance because they didn’t believe he was badly hurt (I thought it was on the way at the time). He was unconscious. I sat with him, covered him with a warm blanket and heard him gasp his last. They got angry when I said I thought he was dead. “It was just a little tree…”

    How will I react when death is imminent? and violence everywhere? God help me to keep a cool head and be able to defend myself and my disabled husband. Until the time comes when I am overwhelmed. As my husband says, take an honor guard with us. Time will tell…

    #42189
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’ve only ever been present for two deaths, one of my brothers and my Dad, both of cancer, and both peaceful passings that we knew were coming. I can only hope that I would be willing and able to act if faced with a violent situation such as Selco discusses. I’m not sure anyone can ever truly be emotionally prepared but I do think it helps just knowing that it is something we could face someday.

    #42191
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    It is shock always, can be minimized with training, learning, and later psychological support, family support and similar things.
    But it is going to be shock again.

    #42196
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    The thing about knowing somebody is going to die , and “preparing ” yourself for it , like in a cancer situation . You may think that you are prepared for that time ………………………….but truth is you never are “prepared ” for it , the only advantage you had, was the time you had with that person to get things said , and questions answered , because of forewarning …………but thats all . ” prepared” ……….no .

    #42204
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I question whether being present at the death of a freind or love one compares adequately with taking a life in violence. In a close encounter I would imagine it more comparable to an atempt at avoiding a major car crash and surviving, mixed with the emotions of purposefully killing something. At least for the inexperienced and untrained.

    #42242
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    All I can do is read about it, try and mentally prepare, but as Selco says,
    It will still be a shock. I also just got done reading “staying out of trouble”
    and these fit together. I am thinking Gray Man, all the way…

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #42247
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I guess it should be noted that there are people that killing comes easy to them and without hesitation. Selco has mentioned them many times, I’ve met a few people like that, some were trained by the military others not.

    #42268
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Depending on the circumstance and reasons, killing can be very easy or very difficult.

    Jim Cirillo spoke of several of his gunfights, the first he felt no fear because he had no time to think about what was happening. Another he was extremely fearful because he had time to think about what was happening. His training carried him through multiple incidents.

    Charles Askins Jr wrote in “Unrepentant Sinner” that he had grown to enjoy the hunting of men. And it was why he had taken up dangerous game hunting so heavily after his retirement, that danger, that excitement.

    Circumstances play heavily into killing.
    Man is attacking your children, you are going to feel different than a soldier in wartime.
    Same goes for distance, that distance separates you from the other person, insulating you from their death. It isn’t personal unlike when they’re at bad breath range.

    A former coworker once said she could never shoot someone. Needless to say she didn’t stay employed long.

    I am reminded of a retired Detroit SWAT officer, out tending his garden/orchard he heard screams from his neighbors house. He went to check it out and ended up dumping a rapist with the .357 he still carried 24/7. The responding officers found him sitting on the porch eating a peach.

    Training and mental preparation play heavily into every situation.

    Some people, for various reasons, just find it easier to perform the act than others in the same circumstances and situation. Some fall apart after, some sit down and eat a peach.

    Almost forgot, a great read on this is by Col. Dave Grossman.

    http://www.amazon.com/On-Killing-Psychological-Learning-Society/dp/0316040932

    #42273
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    I don’t much like talking about this…

    Death is never clean. The stink of bladder and bowels letting go. The coppery smell of blood. The shakes from the adrenaline dump. The smell of burnt hair and charred meat. I couldn’t eat pork chops for about 10 years… just the smell made me gag.

    There’s a saying. The first one is expensive. The rest are free. This is pretty damn accurate.

    Some guys face an existential crisis and have a breakdown. Some guys act like it’s taking out the trash. The point is, you won’t know which one you are until it actually happens.

    And that’s about all I’m gonna say about that.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #42275
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    IF you enjoy it ,………………………..then you need to be removed from society . Just Sayin

    #42706
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Hopefully for the prepared it will be “muscle memory.” You must learn to shoot or run within a second. Selco’s hands-on course sounds like the place to learn. Take what you learn there and keep up the practice.
    With Selco’s course you learn from a person that has been to Hell. Looking back, he keeps us alert and learning. His comments on different things puts the “Real World” into historical events.
    I also recommend that when you pull your weapon with one hand your other is pulling an extra mag while reaching to make a shooting stance. You will not realize it but your first mag will be gone in a blink.
    Robin

    #42711
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Robin, I can’t think of one blooded instructor who advocates that method.
    After that, I’d agre with you.

    #42712
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Robin, I understand your thinking but must agree with Whirly. An unencumbered free hand available to manipulate, or defend would be my choice. Holding something in your hand and trying to manipulate something else at the same time is usually difficult.

    #42731
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    I should have clarified that comment with: I shoot from a “Weaver Stance”, being right handed my left travels from my mag holder straight up to cup my right, shooting hand. Got that way with tons of practice. Shooting the standard right hand mode I had a hard time keeping myself from “pushing” the weapon.

    Selco, could you do a short forum article about “survivor guilt?”

    Thanks to all
    Robin

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