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  • #40624
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Survival’s first lesson: Staying out of trouble

    Do you have examples when staying out of trouble was hard and about consequences of this? Share in comments below.

    #40653
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    “The Young Guns vs Us Old Farts” – We were about 4 months into “United Shield” and could see the light at the end of the tunnel. One day rumor starts about another possible operation in a country on the West Coast of Africa.
    Every where I looked the “Young Guns” were smiling and punching each other and grinning. The “Old Farts” were just shaking our heads and saying: Here we go again!
    “United Shield” was really an “Policing Operation.” Yes SHTF but the operation everyone was talking about would be nothing but sure combat.
    Folks say to just don’t go into trouble areas. Some times we have no choice. Once there we do have options. You do not want to stand up when folks are shooting at you. As Selco told the story about the man that came back to fight: Was your head really with you all day? Did you learn anything about doing stupid things?

    What I have learned is this: Alone there is no chance. Things/folks will catch up with you or you will do something so stupid it gets you killed. Man is not better by himself. We are pack animals.

    Go back and start Selco’s course again. Then join the “Survival Boot Camp.” Many statements that Selco makes will save your butt.
    Learn when to bug-out and when to hide. Learn what things to take with you and what to leave. Learn what to do and what to not even attempt.
    As George Carlin says: “Stuff is Stuff.” Do you really need all that stuff if you are dead?
    Home is home but if staying means dying what is the use?

    Robin

    #40666
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Selco, I always like the thought process you use. My life experiences have not involved war or shtf situations. But I have seen millions of dollars in property damages due to foolish acts and disregard for logical safe practices. The same is true of personal injuries. People take risk without measuring the benefits versus the potential costs. People do it all the time, without giving proper consideration to the liklihood of a serious event happening to them. I’d like to agree with Robin and say it was mostly the young, and inexperienced people are in fact a hazard to themselves and others. But I have seen many many accidents happen to old guys that “always did it this way”.

    #40670
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Lots of food for thought. Stay away from trouble if you can, keep your mouth shut, be prepared if trouble finds you, and be flexible. Adapt to the situation… And the normalcy bias needs to be overcome quickly. Cognitive dissonance… Most of the USA is in this state right now. It can’t be happening, so we will ignore it.

    #40705
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    Robin:

    You make a great point. How many of those young guys came back a lot wiser about the horror of war? I appreciate what Selco passes onto us, based on a real world situation.

    Life has taught me to keep my mouth shut and my ears open. In my youth it was probably reversed.

    Wildartist:

    Agree. It can’t happen here, so why worry about it. When it does happen, then watch the panic, and the “Why didn’t someone tell me this could happen.”

    #40708
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I really believe that given no wars have been fought on US soil in 150 years that most people think it can’t happen here. We’re special you know. Through in the ever increasing mindset that govt. will handle anything that happens, and folks won’t know what hit them. That last point is especially strange when the whole nation saw how inadequate the feds were in handling Katrina which was really just a regional event, and then they still struggled with Sandy which was a considerably smaller regional event, though in a much more heavily populated region.

    #40765
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    in a SHTF avoid others if you can, its not the event that will kill you its other people, especially the sheeple and the unprepared.

    British Survivalist.

    #40770
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Life has taught me to keep my mouth shut and my ears open. In my youth it was probably reversed

    Yea Roadracer, well said. It is usually like that. Young people are young people everywhere. Blood goes trough veins on different way when you are young, and things look easier then. Simply about experience and lessons learned.

    MB, it is simply about way of living, people who lived “better” life will generally have harder time when SHTF. It is not about their weakness or anything similar, it is about fact that most of those folks do not want (or are not able) to accept fact that bad things can happen to them too (or their country, region, society).

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