Viewing 12 posts - 46 through 57 (of 57 total)
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  • #26257
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Inshala
    Personally I think Selco’s own experience is a prime example of what will happen long term. Katrina shows us how fast LE will dissolve. There will be mixtures of localized authority until there is none, just as every novel and movie depicts. Early on in a national/global crisis government at every level will try to respond with LE/military personnel, but as the crisis deepens less and less resources will be available to respond.

    If you use a pandemic as the cause of collapse no one will show up to do anything after a short time. Everyone will want to stay away from others and everything will need sanitizing. Now that the nurse in Spain was infected even though she used a high level of PPE and was in a contained environment, even people wearing hazmat suits will not want to expose themselves. Over 300 medical workers have been infected who were wearing PPE.

    #26265
    Profile photo of Ghost Prime
    Ghost Prime
    Survivalist
    member6

    Inshala, I am curious as to how you picked your profile name. Would you mind explaining? Thanks.

    For God, Family, Country, & Liberty!

    #26280
    Profile photo of Inshala
    Inshala
    Veteran
    member4

    74,

    Please don’t misunderstand me! I absolutely think that Selco’s experiences are invaluable and, perhaps, the most valid thoughts on survival and prepping I’ve ever read. I was merely referring to the thread when I made that comment.

    I absolutely agree that Katrina showed us how easily a localized LE agency can dissolve, but I also wonder if that is the prime example of what will occur across the board or a situation unique to the NOPD and the demographics of New Orleans? I also ponder if the LE/military sustainability depends on what country is deploying that force. Yes, the Balkan countries had/have modernized military and security forces, but they don’t have the same numbers, budget, and vast geography that the U.S. does. Also consider how many tiers of security we have compared to other nations. A U.S. city might enjoy the relative security of a city/municipal PD, followed by county sheriff, followed by state troopers, followed by National Guard. After that was exhausted, consider how many layers of Federal LE we have before resorting to Active Component military. It seems that we might have more resources than most other nations.

    Also, culture is a strong factor. Consider that the various countries that compose the Balkans were modeled and trained by Cold War era Soviets. Their training was much more rudimentary in handling civil unrest. I refer to the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, Soviet war in Afghanistan, the siege of the Russian White House parliament building, First Chechen War, Second Chechen War, Russo-Georgian War, and recent activity in the Ukraine as examples. The Soviet-styled strategy seems to be consistently heavy-handed and brutal compared to what we see in the U.S.

    Lastly, (and obviously) the type of LE/military response we would see greatly depends on the incident to which they are responding. A natural disaster is what we witnessed with Hurricane Katrina and in much milder forms with Irene and Sandy in NY, NJ, and parts of CT and PA. I think the biggest difference is that we have the ability to learn from the mistakes of Katrina and train and prepare accordingly (adapt and overcome). Now that we are faced with a new threat like Ebola, many mistakes will be made. The trick is to survive it to be able to learn and adapt and overcome for the next pandemic. I wonder what we could learn from the Spanish Flu pandemic following WWI? I guess I now have some research to do!

    "If I'm gonna die, I'm gonna die historic on the Fury Road."

    #26281
    Profile photo of Inshala
    Inshala
    Veteran
    member4

    Ghost Prime,

    Not at all! I was deployed numerous times to Iraq and various parts of the Middle East (I was never deployed to Afghanistan). My MOS required me to be very involved with the people of an occupied area. It was during my first tour in 2003-2004 that I often heard the Iraqis use the word “Insh’Allah” over and over and over again. The ‘terps explained that it means “God Willing”, but after hearing it used in context I learned that it pretty much meant “whatever”, “whenever”, or “when I get around to it”. We started using it as a joke around inner circles and now I use it to see who might recognize it. BTW, I like your avatar!

    "If I'm gonna die, I'm gonna die historic on the Fury Road."

    #26285
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Hello Inshala!
    I agree that there are great cultural differences between US and Bakan region, yes, things here usually were handled on “Soviet way”, brutal.

    But it is only matter of time and conditions when it all gonna come to same, give it enough time (prolonged period of SHTF situation) and hard conditions ( lack of food, water, security, hygiene etc.) and all is gonna be stripped to bare fighting for resources, no matter where you are.

    #26287
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6
    #26289
    Profile photo of Ghost Prime
    Ghost Prime
    Survivalist
    member6

    inshala, thanks for the clarification. I knew what it meant so I was having a hard time getting my head wrapped around the idea of a Crusader being called inshala! Just didn’t make sense but now it does. (I like the joke by BTW)

    Tks for the like on the avatar. Seems we think alike as your is along the same line. Way cool. And most of all thanks for your service. We have a lot of military in our family including our oldest Son who just left MARSOC to go to a training command. (Frankly I was relieved to get him out of SF due to the traitor in thief calling the shots now, the Extortion 17 deal, Benghazi, and a host of other criminal acts) Anyway, keep in touch.

    For God, Family, Country, & Liberty!

    #26322
    Profile photo of Ghost Prime
    Ghost Prime
    Survivalist
    member6

    undeRGRond, this is a little late though if you have not considered it, why not ask your Sheriff and his deputies what they think about the CSPOA run by former Sheriff Rick Mack? The group is all about enforcing the Constitution, even their name says it as they are the Constitutional Sheriffs and Police Officers Assoc. Since you know them it would be worth considering as it could be a huge asset if they were to join.

    For God, Family, Country, & Liberty!

    #26665
    Profile photo of Selene
    Selene
    Survivalist
    member1

    Selco- thanks for the posts. They have given me a lot to think about. Here, in USA, we want to believe that the things you’ve experienced couldn’t happen here, not here. There’s a lot of attitude that the ugliness and reality that you’ve experienced we are immune to. I, too, have seen a lot of people die–some violently, others not so much. We (and I mean human beings) are brought up to fear death and unfortunately organized religion often doesn’t help much. As for me, I’m a fighter. I’m going to hold on to as much of life as I can while I can. I believe the SHTF in this country–there are so many problems right now it’s hard to predict which particular S will hit which particular F! LOL
    I live in a very rural part of the southern US. No nuclear reactors within 100 miles, no railroads nearby, no chemical plants to blow up. Yeah, we get the occasional tornado and have to beat feet to the storm cellar but are too far inland for hurricane problems. I live with my 32 yr old son who helps with the farm and we have plans to join up on my 25 acre farm with one other family of 3 should things go sideways. But, it is as you say, no matter how many plans we have laid, none of us is prepared for the dirty, stinking, awfulness that you describe. The only thing that ever helped me was trick I learned to do with my mind. When things got bad I went “inside.” They call it disassociation. It seemed as if I was out of my body, looking just over my left shoulder. I did what had to be done but, at the time, I didn’t feel anything about it. I wasn’t zombie-like, I was still doing my job but I put the emotions about it in a “box” inside myself that I could take out later when things were not so intense and sort them out.
    Given your experience do you think this strategy could be employed to good use if SHTF here?
    Best wishes,
    Selene

    #26677
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Selene, I agree that most in the US think “it can’t happen here”. I think much of it comes from there not having been any wars fought here since the Civil War.

    #26680
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Selene, I absolutely know what you are talking about because before SHTF in my case I thought that things like that happens only in some strange countries, somewhere far away.
    It is in human nature to not expect things like that to happen, especially if someone is not experienced that before.
    Now i expect anything.

    And funny, but I used similar “technique” when I had really really bad times during the SHTF, maybe some kind of fatalism, or similar, my emotions were suppressed.
    Yea, it helped me, but on the other hand all emotions from that time came back years later and hit me like a train so…
    There is no easy way to go over some things, but point is to GO OVER it, to survive.

    #26740
    Profile photo of Ghost Prime
    Ghost Prime
    Survivalist
    member6

    Selene, thanks for being so open with your experience. The mechanism you described where you put issues into boxes sound very muck like compartmentalization, which is something that many men do naturally. Our thought processes tend to be different from females (thank God, and I mean for BOTH of us, LOL) in that we can put something in a box then leave it there to be dealt with later. Of course if we males continually ignore a “box” with a very serious matter in it, we get stressed, then we can do all sorts of weird things to try to compensate for or cover up the stress.

    My experience with “disassociation” or putting things into boxes is that we all have to deal with it at some point or we run the risk of a core melt down. For soldiers it is called PTSD. For medical professionals and others in high stress professions it is called burnout. Whatever it is called, it must at some point be faced head on if we are to get past it. I have had to deal with mine and have survived, largely because of my Faith and my Friends. It has been my experience that most people carry heavy burdens with them but many never admit it even to themselves. The way we describe it from a faith perspective is that everyone carries their own cross. How we deal with that burden defines our life to a large extent as many authors and POW’s have proven. I pray that we here are all up to facing our personal burdens so we can do what is necessary to save our countries.

    For God, Family, Country, & Liberty!

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