Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 153 total)
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  • #23307
    GRA
    GRA
    Veteran
    member2

    Down here near Galveston the water table is fairly close. Six hours north outside of Dallas I believe it is a little higher. Our land up there is in the county so wells and septic tanks are the norm. I never plan on living there but I have thought about the place as a bug-out location as it is pretty much the target (Dallas area) of those evacuating down here, Naturally my first thought is to clear a good part of it and go ahead and do a well and possible modern septic tank, as well as build a small cabin. I would however be concerned with how I could secure the place while we are gone since we really dont get up there much anyway.

    Thanks for your response. The simple hand pump is a great idea.

    Many of them cried; "Me no Alamo - Me no Goliad" and for most of them these were the last words they spoke.

    #23314
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    As I heard someone say a few days ago, a well alone may be okay for household needs but not much use if you want to get into serious food production and you don’t have the use of a powered pump to keep the flow going; it’s too much work to pump by hand that sort of quantity. Even worse if the water is hundreds of feet down. He said that what is really needed for homesteading is access to year-round water like a creek or a river for effective irrigation.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #23319
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    GRP, MountainBiker is right that we do not know were your water table is. Where I live in Florida it is 10 feet deep. It’s almost all coral rock. I owned a house five years ago in the gulf in Florida and the water table was 8 feet all sand, very easy do make a well but needed a well pump because the water is in the sand so you need to power of the pump to pull the water out. He is right if your well is not to deep add a hand well pump. They do make the hand well pumps for deep wells but they are not cheap.

    #23378
    GRA
    GRA
    Veteran
    member2

    I dont know exactly what my water table is up in the Dallas, Texas area. I’m actually in Rains County, Texas which has 2 huge lakes; Lake Tawakoni and Lake Fork. Lake Fork is a championship bass lake. I’m about 6 miles from each lake. In a hurricane bugout situation I will only need well water for about 7-10 days at the very most. Usually we would return within 24-72 hours. We will not need anything long-term. With just 2 adults and no children, I feel an 8 x 16 cabin is fine with another possible 8 x 10 for out door toilet, laundry, and shower. Cooking will be accomplished with a propane grill and/or wood stove that will be in a smaller screened-in enclosure. This is my plan so far. I have to start somewhere and the long-term bugout needs will be addressed later. Thanks for all the tips. Anything else will be much appreciated.

    Many of them cried; "Me no Alamo - Me no Goliad" and for most of them these were the last words they spoke.

    #23379
    GRA
    GRA
    Veteran
    member2

    My main concern is a well in the city. Here I probably would be able to hit good water much sooner as opposed to 4 hours north of the Gulf Coast and I would only use the well when city water was not potable. I guess I need to figure out how to drill a water well in the suburb here and somehow conceal the fact it exists. I’m sure a hand pump would work fine in either place.

    Many of them cried; "Me no Alamo - Me no Goliad" and for most of them these were the last words they spoke.

    #23380
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    GRA, given the relative dryness of the Dallas area, I’d consider having a couple barrels of water at the cabin kept full all the time so as to have a safety supply.

    #23381
    GRA
    GRA
    Veteran
    member2

    That is a great idea and honestly I have thought about that. I need to get a couple of new plastic food-grade 55 gallon drums for that purpose. Haven’t had the time lately to shop for them though in Houston. Thanks again for the reminder.

    Many of them cried; "Me no Alamo - Me no Goliad" and for most of them these were the last words they spoke.

    #23382
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    GRA, concerning a well in the city, a shallow well can likely be hand dug during the dry time of the year. My next door neighbor has a shallow well that used to be their main supply before he replaced it with a deep well. The shallow well is lined with corrugated steel and has a corrugated steel lid. Our water table is very high though and so you don’t have to go down very deep before hitting water.

    #23386
    GRA
    GRA
    Veteran
    member2

    It is very hard to dig anything of depth here in the dry time of the year. The ground here in the Texas Gulf Coast area is caliche clay, or Beaumont clay as it is often called. Best time to dig or use an auger is within 72 hours after a good rain. The area is not draining like it used to about 30 years ago and around September – October is the best time to dig because when it rains and we have about 10 degrees less heat the ground stays soft longer. Again, my main concern is how would I conceal a small well if I do one in the city? As I understand it there are many underground streams in this part of the state and I don’t know how deep I should go to get good filtration … ???

    Many of them cried; "Me no Alamo - Me no Goliad" and for most of them these were the last words they spoke.

    #23391
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Urban well? Put a dog house on top of it.
    Run a loop of decent sized chain back inside the flap closure so it seems the dog is sleeping. Add a water bowl and who’s gonna check?

    #23392
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    GRA I live in Texas too. Judging by your other post, probably not more than 2 hours from where you live. That gumbo clay is some nasty stuff. The water table in your area may only be 6 feet down but you may have to go a good bit deeper to get to fresh water. A shallow well might only yield salt water being close to the coast.You stated you lived in the city. That would be another reason to go deeper since you don’t know what contaminants might be in the upper layer of soil. There was an article in Backwoodsman magazine a while back that had an article about digging your own shallow well. I will have to look through my back issues to see which one it was. They used a well point, which is like a corrugated steel pipe with a spike on the end, and drove it in with a weighted t post rammer. They added pipe as they went until they got the depth they wanted. I just don’t know how well it would work in your soil.

    #23394
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Good idea Whirli. Put a beware of dog sign on your fence too. Then they really won’t check.

    #23395
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Be careful of the sign, you don’t want animal control stopping by about your unlicensed dog and checking out the dog house.

    #23396
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Good point.

    #23402
    GRA
    GRA
    Veteran
    member2

    Never thought of that. Good idea. Thanks.

    Many of them cried; "Me no Alamo - Me no Goliad" and for most of them these were the last words they spoke.

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