Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #21503
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Full article is here.

    Please share your thoughts and ideas here. Besides first aid kits how do you prepare for medical problems in case of SHTF?

    #21505
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    This is a bit weird. Selco’s post and then a note from a member of a group:


    Marsha Gale 10:46am Aug 10

    Good morning all and hope all are safe and well. Someone is sick in my house so I’m headed to my little cabin. Her mother went to care for the 3 years old (both her daughter and grand-daughter live upstairs). Last time someone got sick upstairs it was not shared with us until everyone got sick. I mean seriously bad sick (the grand-daughter caught the Whooping Cough from her little best friend who goes to daycare, then we as adult’s got some mutated version of it and took me nearly a month myself to recover.) I’m going to practice isolation for a few days down there as I don’t know what it is yet she has. No one has been sick, we babysat last night so the Mom could have a girl’s night out. So, don’t know if she was already sick or played to much with her friends as in too much libation. So, for me, I’m practicing the art of isolation. We all talk about what we need in flu/cold/pandemic cases but we rarely talk about “Isolation”. So it is good we have a separate cabin which is a pond house with everything one needs except wi-fi. Books, movies, shower, cook stove, hot water, ac/electric heater and wood burning stove, port-o-pottie, cell phone and taking my dogs with me too. ”

    LIke the person above I first react with isolation. Another member is really into the natural ways of healing and living. I try to get as much info from her as possible.

    After 10 years in my primary BOL I am moving to my secondary. Mice, rats and ceiling falling in were too much for the owner to handle so the cabin is condemned. My buried stuff will remain but starting over with just ammo, weapons and information from this forum and Selco’s lists. My nurse friends have either moved or retired so I am going for stuff that a Vet uses. Bandages and such I can get anywhere. Add in the information from natural ways and I think I will be better off in new location than here. New location about 10 miles but on creek that feeds this river.
    Robin

    #21506
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    I’m steering clear of talking about some things since what I’ve said about the nature of infections has gone over like a lead balloon, so instead I’d like to take a different angle about disease, which is preparing the body to give it the best chance of resisting disease, whether or not it’s in a shtf situation.

    The human body will generally do a lot to protect against disease, but it needs good resources to work with. Food with high nutrition is obvious, but don’t rely on mass market food any more than you have to, since so much of it is processed [which often strips the nutrients out of it], and has additives that over time can build a Toxic Load in the body, leading to a lowered resistance to illnesses. I suggest, if possible, to grow as much of your own food as possible, or source it from trustworthy sources. Keep in mind that the quality of much mechanized farm produce is poor because the soil minerals is often depleted.

    Read up on the different vitamins and minerals and what parts of the body they effect. Also be aware that the RDI is merely the minimum daily dose to avoid scurvy, not the optimum does for good health. Proper attention to these matters will help give your body the resources it needs to combat infection.

    Make sure that cooked food is cooked thoroughly. Rare meat is considered very tender, but the way to ensure that meat doesn’t have live bugs in it is to cook the food so that all of it is too hot for bugs to live. Obviously meat may not be available in shtf, but you never know; there are lots of different shtf scenarios and some are not as severe as others.

    Make sure all cooking and eating implements are properly clean, if possible.

    Don’t allow waste to build up near your home. Burn it, bury it, whatever you can, so that rats and mice are not attracted. Also make sure the waste is down wind of you. A good supply of gloves and face masks can be a help.

    All this hygiene stuff is not sexy and is hard work and a lot of bother, but an illness avoided is better than being cured of it.

    More could be said but I’m sure I’ve said enough.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #21524
    Profile photo of claymor
    claymor
    Survivalist
    member2

    I believe the best preventive maintenance when it comes to getting sick or contracting contagion is isolation and cleanliness. To accomplish this, every Prepper should have a huge stock of Human Waste Contamination Bags, heavy duty garbage bags, boxes of sterile latex gloves and sterile surgical masks. If there is a Bug-In situation where the power is down and there’s no running water, disposing of human waste will become a big sanitary issue quick, not prepared to deal with it can be the x-factor to sickness and disease. The isolation factor may be a bit easier to deal with in a pandemic scenario, don’t open the door, to anyone. Maybe easier said than done.

    #21526
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Good points, hygiene and prevention is a key, and it is somehow boring topic in discussions about SHTF, but it is crucial.
    Often folks get to much into the more “popular” topics and forget this stuff.

    #21539
    Profile photo of johnnymac
    johnnymac
    Survivalist
    member2

    Many homes in 18th- through early 20th-Century American homes had “sick rooms”. A “sick room” is a space, temporary or permanent, set aside for the care of a family member during their illness. This isolated the sick person (somewhat) from the healthy members of the family, as well as providing a quiet, comfortable place for the patient to recuperate. In my Great-Grandparents house in rural North Carolina, the “sick room” was on the ground floor, next to the kitchen (and doubled as an extra pantry). Because of the close proximity to the kitchen, the room was warmer than most other rooms in the house, and the patient could be observed throughout the day by whoever was in the kitchen. This room was also used as a “birthing” and “laying-in” room.

    I believe it is essential to prepare a “sick room” (temporary or permanent) as part of a BOL/BIL. In my current home, the designated “sick room” is an unused basement bedroom, which has a bathroom right next to it. The layout of the basement is such, that a “cold-zone to hot-zone” transition area can be set up to allow caregivers to don PPE (masks/gloves/gown) before entering the sick room, and then to de-contaminate after rendering care.

    #21545
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Been reading up on activated charcoal.

    Seems this stuff is pretty damn useful for all sorts of stuff. Poisons, bad food, poultices and the like. Couple 3 spoonfuls in a glass of water will fix you right up….

    Not saying it will cure diseases, but for run of the mill stuff – like when you eat bad food and get food poisoning – it seems to work wonders… we will be investing in a good amount of it…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #21551
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    On infectious diseases prevention you need to keep your hands clean at all times, try not to put your hands in you eyes and mouth. Wash your hands all the time. Clean all areas where people are located.

    Flu virus doesn’t have much medicine that will do anything. Zinc, Vitamin C, echinacea, green tea, honey all help.
    For the throat apple cider vinegar kills everything. Also pain killer(Aspirin, ibuprofen, or Acetaminophen) will help with the fever. Prevention is the key. Gloves and masks will be needed if it is an airborne virus.

    A sick room is a good idea, buy plastic and duck tape to seal the room. But the sick room is only for infectious diseases.

    #21558
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>elijah wrote:</div>some things since what I’ve said about the nature of infections has gone over like a lead balloon,

    I don’t think that is the case. More like there is no argument to be made with your comments. We should all eat better and take vitamins to strengthen our bodies.

    #21579
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Took care of my mother for 2 years at home before she died. Learned a heck of a lot. Being ‘out there’, there were no hospice people available to help. A visiting nurse every 2 weeks taught me what to do.

    Lessons learned (in no particular order) about:

    The Room Itself

    -best for all if near center of activity. Makes caring for patient easier; makes patient feel less alone and abandoned

    -if possible room should have tile or wood floor for easy cleaning and disinfecting. Long-term, terminal patient care can be messy as he**

    – adequate ventilation – illness has an odor

    -windows and good light are a bonus. Gives patient something to do (watch, look, talk about, i.e. weather or what have you) and you will need to perform some things that require good light to see

    -visit thrift stores where these things collect and are very cheap and store them (not just for terminal patients) to equip the room:

    -rolling, adjustable height tray table for patient feeding, use, your use to hold supplies during procedures
    – crutches, walkers and canes – avoid falls and more complications (these will be very useful in SHTF in general – sadly I have my own large supply from previous injuries already – walkers are preferable IMHO if you have to choose)
    – urinal and bed pan
    – toilet seat with handles when patient is still able to get out of bed but can not travel far (also helps them feel more ‘normal’).
    – several small buckets (you will be surprised how many times you will want one – especially when giving bed baths)
    -large, tall plastic trash can with lid to hold all the trash. Be sure to burn or bury medical waste (used gauze, bandages etc)
    -a chef’s bib apron with pockets or a smock.
    – a small, curved tray (don’t know the name) that fits under patients chin. They can brush teeth if bed ridden and spit out the fluid – and useful for mild vomiting
    – scissors – sharp, long, thin blade
    – large stacks of either cheap wash cloths or get a bag of painters or auto mechanic cotton rags. Usually white or blue. Use one set (color) for patient care; the other set (color) for cleaning/disinfecting so you don’t mix up the 2 and contribute to potential contamination
    – a roll of thick plastic. This can be used under the patient that is incontinent to protect the mattress of whatever they are lying on. Try to invest in the larger, specifically made ‘adult incontinence pads’ – they are baby blanket size and wick moisture away.
    – a covered jar or container of large, single head cotton swabs for applying ointments, cleaning out orifices
    – a covered box or container of large gauze pads for cleaning up all manner of bodily things of an ill person
    – kleenex or something else you can use and dispose of
    – unscented talc – helps dry out and soothe skin in areas that are prone to being subjected to moisture during an illness or incontinence, and under breasts for patients with high fever
    – unscented moisturizer – (peanut oil is close to skin oil in make up if no commercial product like Nivea is available) – patients skin will dry out and so will your hands you keep washing
    – pump bottle of hand sanitizer or similar – keep your hands and patient hands clean
    – spray bottle of alcohol, or disinfecting cleaner. Wipe down everything as often as possible (whole other post could be made of that)
    – mop and bucket (be sure and disinfect and clean both the mop and the bucket after each use and dry thoroughly or you risk just re-contaminating or spreading germs wherever else you use them)
    – bobby pins or hairdresser style spring hair clips – come in handy for many things including keeping patients hair out of face and holding back bed garments
    -consider making or buying a few hospital type gowns. really do make patient care much easier than a Tshirt or other ‘normal’ clothes.
    -several sets of sheets (top sheets only are easiest – change, clean/disinfect and rotate often and, unfortunately it will sometimes be several times a day)
    – blankets and comforters – cotton and wool are best
    – a foam ‘bed wedge’ – an angled piece of wide foam to put behind the patient to elevate the trunk of their body if you don’t have a hospital bed with electricity – so they don’t choke when they eat or take medicine
    – a covered container of fresh, clean water and ideally disposable cups
    – a roll (find usually in paint dept area of Home Depot) of 2 or 4″ wide, self adhesive, gritted tape. Use this, cut in strips, placed in rows, on the floor on the side of the bed a patient will get out of (if ambulatory) and in front of any sink or toilet. This will help prevent slips and falls that would make the situation worse. Patients are usually barefoot or have socks on – if fevered or ‘out of it’, unstable – big help.
    – a wind up timer like you use in a kitchen or a small electronic one. Some treatments must be timed. Also helps when counting breaths per minute and more
    – cards, puzzle books etc – something for conscious, able patient to DO. throw them all out when well or they pass away.
    – cheap, individually packed ear plugs and a washable eye mask. Helps patients rest better during the day when they need to, is daylight and household is active
    – lots of sponges and softer, personal care sponges like sea sponges for giving bed baths

    Will try and write what learned about
    1) Patient Care – General
    2) Patient Care – Terminal
    3) How to Disinfect a Sick Room
    4) How to Tell When Someone is About to Die and What to Do Afterwards

    in future, time permitting. Meantime – every one else feel free to do that too. Selco would probably know best. Mine info is from my experiences only. Now have 91 yr old father here. Soon to be a repeat no doubt.

    Hope it helps someone.

    #21580
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    tweva, great list of items needed. I still have my mother 82 and my father which will turn 85 alive and they still take care of them self’s but I see my self doing all the things you have done. It is our life, this is what we are here for to take care of our children and then to take care of our parents.

    In a SHTF there maybe many older people that will need to be taken care of.

    #21584
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Tweva – Thanks for bringing back wonderful memories. My mother was 93 when I was her care provider. We had hospice come in every day but I did not wait for them to do everything.
    “Bed Wedge” – What I found was a huge pillow device that looked like the upper part of a LazyBoy recliner. This way she could sit up and read or watch the bird feeder outside her window. This also allowed for washing her hair. Instead of the thick part being down you have her lay back with the thick part up behind her shoulders. This way she would lay back but I had room for a plastic basin to fit under her head. In the hospital the nurses used a foam spray on her hair. Said to be as good as a shampoo but it did not give the same results. Washing her hair helped her to calm herself and also gave me a chance to do something for her. Your list and Selco’s have now become my new guidelines for hygiene and first aid.
    Robin

    #21606
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    One additional suggestion to add to tweva’s list for the bedridden are genuine sheep skins for a person to lie on; I’ve heard they help reduce the occurrence of bed sores. They would have to be cleaned of any unsanitary wastes, so a number of them would be needed.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

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