Tagged: 

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #5176
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Friend has small herd of livestock. Not in an arid climate, but summers can be complete drought. He decided to build a trial ‘dew pond’ up in a pasture that would be hard to get water to w/out electricity other than by hand (i.e. lug buckets). Never know any more if we are going to have a hot as heck/dry summer. Need a plan. We built it small 6′ diameter just to see if it worked. It did.

    It would be best to read about them so you understand how and why they work so you know what you might need to tweak as you experiment. Going to help make a bigger one this spring (but with a tractor!)



    Process is fairly simple, this is the non-scientific, basic method we used:
    Depending on size:
    Need: Open area (no overhanging trees etc), bales of straw and heavy pond liner or sufficient for size you are going to build to test/learn. If working with hyper male that is erroneously convinced he knows everything, you might also need a hammer!

    Dig a big hole in the center of where you want the dew pond down far enough to reach dampish earth. Excavate/contour out from the center big hole to resemble basically a very wide, ‘V’ shape with very shallow edges. Think – outer edges like walking in shallow puddle and almost getting tops of shoes wet. Flare out to very shallow basin in other words..
    Use material you take out to make a shallow berm around it. If you have rocks of any sort, place a layer around the berm on a slope into the beginning of the outer very shallow (couple inches) edge
    Break up the straw and (we used the flakes) to make a mat to cover the bottom and sides of it.
    Place the pond liner over it and up the berm. If you have rocks of any sort, place a layer around the berm on a slope into the beginning of the outer very shallow (couple inches) edge

    We did make allowance for the fact it might rain and overflow so provided for that. And we are blessed/cursed with lots of fieldstone that definitely we think, help ‘collect’ condensate because increases surface area.

    #5602
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Now thats something for me to try out right there. Now snow go away so I can build this!! Thank you Tweva

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #5609
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Gypsy – Oh boy yeah, I hear you. Here I normally should be cutting grass or something – today 37 and stupid snow flurries again. Google rex institute and dew ponds (or something like that I forget) and you’ll see more detailed info. Links I thought I added ‘disappeared’ when I posted it. Also, google dew pints, but under images – gives better idea of the gradient, how shallow to make at edges. Been a huge workload for my friend’s husband – power goes off in their pasture up there all the time – getting a bit old with replaced hip to be carting buckets in high heat.

    #5792
    Profile photo of libbylindy
    libbylindy
    Survivalist
    member4

    How much water does it generate in the course of an average 24 hour period? We live in very rocky limestone and there isn’t “moist earth” down there! It is caleche! I wonder if it would work for me. I guess there is one way to find out. We can cheat – we have a backhoe to dig the pond area!

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.