Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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  • #28966
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Elderly gentleman teaching us stealth walking started something new this week. Went to various different parts of property and we blindfolded ourselves once sitting on ground. With help of two grandsons 2 hours of different sounds from different distances. Very interesting. Homework is to do it at night.

    I see a use for developing this for myself in many respects, – do you? For just one instance, I was thinking I need to pay more attention to the different sounds at distances various weapons make as well…..

    #28967
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    Sounds like your gonna be a ninja :D

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #28969
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Huh Kos too old and creaky for that. But if I can develop some skills to help me avoid trouble I will do my best. Stealth walking/meeting this gentleman was a fluke – not something I sought out – but glad for the fluke.

    #28971
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Between years in the hunting fields and years hunting men, there’s a particular set of noises you hear and expect and can identify in each situation.

    The problem for some of us, is hearing damage and the associated missing noises or additional noises such as tinnitus.

    Weapons, that’s going to vary heavily for most of us.
    Unlike a war zone where only a handful of different guns are normally used, M16 and AK for example, and you can easily tell the difference, a .30-30 fired from the same place as a .300 Mag would sound like it came from a different distance rather than just the same direction.

    Other rounds/firearms such as 9mm carbines, the sound can play tricks on you.

    #28979
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tweva,
    Knowing all of the normal sounds for your sorroundings is a great start as well as knowing if there are any noise bending features that make it difficult to determine direction. Wind and rain make it really hard to depend on hearing as a method of advance warning. One of my favorite times to go hunting is after a long rain when everything is soft and makes very little noise.

    #28984
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Whirlibird wrote:</div>The problem for some of us, is hearing damage and the associated missing noises or additional noises such as tinnitus.

    Yes, tinnitus is problem. I have mild tinnitus Whirly. It was very noticeable when doing this exercise – normally I try not to let it bother me.Sister has it very bad and now hums a lot (itself annoying) to cover it so she doesn’t go crazy. Also has vertigo. BTW this has helped her with the vertigo if anyone has the same issue.

    Anyway, the twigs and branches breaking were an education. Some we got and knew what it was. Other times, depending on distance etc we all just laughed and had to call it forest sounds. One guy swore that the sound of one of them slowly chambering a round was the scrape of boots on a rock. (I don’t think I wanna hang out with him when shtf) Freakiest of all was not hearing someone approaching us as we sat blindfolded in a field of 7/8″ tall grass.

    I have been trying to figure out, with the lay of my land, where the ricochet of sounds happens. Was surprised when cutting up the ‘big tree’ that crashed the paddock fence to hear it so loudly when banging in the nails, rebuilding the fence. It isn’t in much of a low spot from surrounding land – at least what I could tell. Where I think it would happen (mostly around the lower lying pond – it doesn’t) Well…something else to learn.

    #28986
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    I would love to hear more about silent walking tweva.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #28995
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Yes, I was wondering about the walking part too.

    #28997
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Tom Brown, does quite a bit of this at his tracker school.
    There’s some you tube vids if memory serves.

    The Boy Scouts used to teach this, but its been years.

    #29040
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Here is a link for the original post I had created about 6 months ago…for background for those that have joined since then about ‘stealth walking’.

    Since then our small group has grown a bit and through the generosity of this wonderful, elderly, thoroughly amazing older gentleman have been learning lots of very cool, interesting, never-would-have-normally given it a thought stuff. Although elderly this gentleman is very limber (10 times myself at close to 60) and I can not express in words the sense of absolute calm he sends out. I wish I knew how that happens. I am always very peaceful yet hyper-focused feeling when I leave his ‘togetherness’ meeting as he calls them.

    I can say that only in about the last 2 weeks do I think I am beginning to, without thinking, more often than not, actually do/move as we have been being taught. I do notice here and there, without intending, people being startled at my presence and get the ‘Oh you scared me – I didn’t hear you/know you were there’…in every day sort of situations.

    One of the biggest pluses, for me with all the critters, is they do not hear me coming as much I think (haha when trying to catch them/move them). With their more limited vision (degree wise) I have been having a much easier time gathering up my friends, or a particular friendly animal I need to work with out of the pasture of paddock.

    I have also gone to some length to fix with screws all of the many places in my home I have found/didn’t realize, where the floorboards squeak. Our friend (the instructor) never said as much but I have come to realize one of the keys to silent movement is achieved by calmness and concentration in ‘becoming’/trying to be part of your surroundings. Hard to put in to words. Blending – smoothness sorts of thoughts help overcome immeasurably errors in technique. There is a measure of heightened attention to sound that goes with it of course.

    I’ll try and find the vids Whirly mentioned. It has become a very interesting side/past time for me. Some of the others in the group are still finding it difficult to make progress, but given their natural sort of personality I guess it may not be so surprising.

    Hope the link and this brings newer friends up to speed on the subject. Sorry I forget most of you haven’t been on the forum since day one.

    #29054
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    You probably don’t remember the movie Richard Gere made with Kim Bassinger called No Mercy. He used sound to ambush his attackers. This was back in 86 but wow do I remember it. He plotted every little floorboard squeak so he knew exactly where to shoot when the attackers came. Even now I can still identify people by the sounds they make when they walk. Its also a game people play. I do it to. Its stalking for fun. See how aware people are. See how quiet you can be. If you practice it enough it becomes your sixth sense. lol

    #29087
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Identifying sounds is fun. It makes you pay attention. We use it every day but give little mind to it. The sound of a door not closing fully or an odd sound our computer makes all give us hints something is out of place. My oldest daughter used to be terrified of the dark when she was little. After a long stint of waking up in the middle of the night and wanting to get into bed with my wife and I, I had had enough. One night we played a game. She woke up and came in the room. I got out of bed and took here in the living room. We sat on the couch in total darkness. She was scared and wanted the light on. I said no and made her close her eyes. I talked calmly to her and settled her down. I then told her to listen and tell me what she heard. At first i got a lot of scared “what was that” comments. As i began to tell her what each noise was she settled more. It took about 3 or 4 nights of doing this but she finally started identifying the sounds on her own. She was beginning to know whatwas going bump in the night. It didn’t take long and she quit getting out of bed much to my relief. The key is being familiar with the sounds around you. Once you know them you will be able to distinguish when there is a foreign sound that doesn’t belong.

    #29096
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “The key is being familiar with the sounds around you. Once you know them you will be able to distinguish when there is a foreign sound that doesn’t belong” ; Matt,

    Now I have a dog for this purpose :) The slightest odd noise will draw attention until it is determined to be safe or not.

    #29149
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks tweva. Very interesting. Sort of another way of being aware of your surroundings.

    #29294
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tweva btw are you practicing moving around your house in complete darkness. It goes hand in hand with steath walking and listening skills.

    My ears below:

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