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  • #13310
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    My job is taking care of foreclosed bank owned properties. As a result I get to encounter law enforcement officers a few times a year when a neighbor calls them to report someone breaking into an abandoned house. Up until a couple weeks ago it has always been a Sheriff’s deputy out in the county areas. They ask what I am doing and why. I show them my work orders and give them a business card, we chat for a bit and that’s it.

    I had my first experience with the local city cops. Very different and scary. They came into the house like a swat team, stuck a gun in my face, hand cuffed me and started barking questions. They had no interest in my work orders or calling the numbers I had to verify that I belonged there. They asked if I was alone. I said yes and then two of them peeled off and went upstairs, guns drawn, while the cop holding me kept asking who was with me and where were they. I told them again I was alone. Then they found a locked door, actually not locked just too complex for them to open a door knob I guess, and demanded to know why I had locked it and what was it hiding. I said I did not lock any doors, I was alone and I was hiding nothing. Then they stand me up and walk me into the front living room and ask how I got in the house. I asked them if they turned the door knob to come in the back door. The cop looked at me like I was crazy and said yes. So I asked if they had noticed the key in the door knob and the open lock box hanging from the door and would someone please call the number on the real estate broker notice taped to the front door so they could verify that I was supposed to be at the house. The entire time this is going on the cop who cuffed me is staring at me with his hand on his gun and the look on his face was like he was praying I would try something.

    Basically, they were ******** and were disappointed and upset when a sergeant arrived and told them to remove the handcuffs because he thought it was obvious that I was not a thief. His logic was simple. Thieves do not park trucks with trailers full of lawn equipment out front with the emergency flashers on, they do not open the lock box and use the key to open the door and they do not wear bright safety orange shirts and hats. When I asked him to call the number on the sign he did so and verified that I was who I said I was and that I was supposed to be there. Once he did this the others just left without saying a word. The sergeant was cool and we chatted for few minutes and I gave him a business card and then he left. Also, I had to ask the cop who frisked me to return my knife. He did so reluctantly.

    I do not worry about me. I am confident I can handle just about any situation I come across. I am also glad my wife was not with me. She has a bad knee and cannot simply drop to her knees and I am afraid that the one cop that kept giving me the stink eye would have tackled her. She stays home when I make my first visits to that area now.

    #13312
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Call the local PD and let them know you’re going to be there.

    Prevent them from being arsehats.

     

    This from a former LEO.

    #13314
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Its getting to the point in this country , that this is going to be the best way ………………….

     

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    #13321
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Police folks are just like any other, there s good, there s bad. Some of them are sick, yes. Just like any others.

    For example I heard many times that folks who work in “health services” (hospitals, EMS etc.) like nurses, doctors etc. needs to be people who are “nice” who understand any sympathize with people in pain etc etc.

    In reality there s lot of wrong folks there too, it is like any other occupation.

    #13335
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Everyone in the country, including the police are nervous and on edge in this country – even if they do not realize it directly. You can feel it

    #13383
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Yes , BUT they are not in the army , its a job , they can quit at any time . I have a friend that was a Deputy Marshal , then a corrections officer after that , he told me it was affecting his life too much and he didn’t like what it was turning him into …………..so he QUIT , and became an AC repairman , now he and his family are happy . And like a soldier , a cop knows what he is going to be doing before he signs up for the job , no excuses for abuse of power . Period .

    #13404
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    In every job there is bad and good people. Here my son does a summer camp with the Coral Gables Police and my son loves this camp and the police officers. He knows them by there names and has a great time with them.

    So yes there is always some bad apples in every job but many are very good.

    #13420
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Oh look, another anecdote about roided up thugs itching to get in some stick time or an excuse to play with the shiny toys the city gives them…

    I can’t believe you guys are rationalizing this away with “oh well, there’s good and bad in every profession”… these guys literally possess the power to be judge, jury and executioner under color of law. And you all are cool with “there’s good and bad in every group”?

    There should BE NO BAD in a group like this… that’s what screening applicants is for, psychological testing, etc. One or two sneak through in a group of thousands, like in a department the size of LAPD? Okay, I can buy that. But there’s way, way too many incidents of citizens being abused and killed at the hands of these guys for it to be “an isolated incident”… hogwash.

    Anytime I have an encounter with a member of The Brotherhood, I comply with his commands, but other than that?

    – No polygraph
    – No statement
    – No waiver
    – I do not consent to anything.
    – I want a lawyer.

    And I really don’t give a flying f*&k if my actions “appear suspicious”… Calm the hell down, Beretta. Go get your drug sniffing dog, whose “alert posture” is a blank stare, I really could care less… tear my truck apart on the flimsiest of made-up justifications. You will find nothing, and I got nothing but time. I will watch you effing FAIL with glee… and I will smirk in your fat effing facist face as you let me go…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #13421
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    I make it a habit to groom both the local sheriffs office folks, game wardens and state officers. They, and a couple folks I know on the other side of the law, are my best source of information.

    Robin

    #13455
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Malgus, I know that the system gives them to much power and many use that power for the wrong reasons.

    Man will always have this problem, some start being good and end up being bad. This is why no matter what system of screening they develop there will always be some bad. Money, power are two of the reasons this happens and not just with the police. It happens to all. God knows this well.

    I do think that the system need a new screening system. Every 4 to 5 years they should be looked at by an independent group to make sure that they have not lost they way.

    #13466
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    There really is no excuse for the way they treated me. I understand making sure I was unarmed, they really do not know my intentions. But to blatantly ignore me when I offered a simple no brainer solution, that is reprehensible.

    This is not my first time dealing with what passes for law enforcement around here. I know they treat everyone like they are some sort of arch criminal. It only took me about 1 second to access the situation decide how to react. Once I saw that I was dealing with a large group of officers I knew I was not dealing with someone capable of making a rational decision. I was dealing with a mob with a mob mentality. And this mob was armed and dangerous and bored and looking for it’s next adrenaline rush.

    I decided that discretion was the greater part of valor and presented myself as unoffensive as possible. I refused to give them any excuse to get their jollies at my expense.

    I am going to see if I can work something out with the police chief next week so they know when they roll up on me that what I do looks suspicious, but I am breaking no laws. Part of my job is to break in to houses to re-key the locks and install a lock box to allow access for the bank.

     

     

    #13467
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    A while back now, we used to get calls from repo men.

    They were calling for two reasons, their own safety, after all they do look like car theives. And so the car wasn’t reported stolen.

    We’d roll into the area, just in case someone did something stupid like pulling a gun.

    I’ll say it again, call em before you go, it smoothes everything over and the dispatchers can handle the call rather than sending the tactical tommies out to play.

     

     

    #13485
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    There should be NO tactical Tommies …………………this isnt Somalia . These guys want to show how tough they are , then send them to Russia in the middle of winter , with all the ***** tack **** they want ……..and then have them go head to head with Spetsnaz ……….tactical tommy will be coming home in a casket , with all his fancy **** basically unused . Sad thing is , the Russian SWAT , OMOH as they call it there , exercises far much more restraint than the ones here do , and thats in a country with twice the murder rate as the US and dealing with heavily armed Mafia  on a daily basis . Whats wrong with that picture ?

    #13487
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I learned over the years to understand the cops (not like them but understand them). It is often really bad how they treat people but it is simply years and years of dealing with problematic people that made them that way. It is still wrong but if you had a few encounters where you put yourself in danger by being too nice you simply change your mode of operation.

    Of course there are also power mad bad guys who enjoy slamming you into a wall sometimes or play other games with you.

    I am going to see if I can work something out with the police chief next week so they know when they roll up on me that what I do looks suspicious, but I am breaking no laws. Part of my job is to break in to houses to re-key the locks and install a lock box to allow access for the bank.

    Did you sometimes encounter people who did not want to leave?

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #13502
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    The problem with law enforcement in America is the change in thought process that comes from the change in classification from peace officer to enforcement officer. They are no longer there to maintain peace. They are there to enforce the law as they see it and bend you to their will. They are kitted out like soldiers now. This causes them to take on the mindset of a soldier on patrol.

    I saw and experienced this same transformation when I was in the military. When I was in the Navy standing guard even in war was typically a relaxed condition. You had a pistol and you patrolled the ship, pier and/or base, you remained alert for trouble, but you did not go looking for trouble and when you found it you tried to maintain order and diffuse the situation. Escalation and being a jerk were the last resort.

    On the other hand, In Desert Storm when I was assigned to ride shotgun and guard the ships bus and my shipmates as it traveled through potentially hostile territory I was different guy. I wore 2nd Chance ceramic plate armor, a Kevlar helmet, carried extra ammo, a combat knife, gloves, etc. My head was on a swivel, I was in tactical mode, and I was constantly looking for trouble to arrive at any second. I was the only defense my buddies had.

    This is what is happening to our police forces today. They are in tactical mode all the time. They simply do not know how to turn it off anymore. They will shoot first and ask questions later and since it is other police officers investigating the shooting they know they will suffer no repercussions if they kill someone because the fraternity protects its own.

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