Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 57 total)
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  • #10256
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Hannah, it is the best way to take care of trash, dead animals, and the died.

    #10285
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    One more thing to keep in mind is fact that process of body decomposition is pretty fast, particularly in warm and wet climate, and process actually starts right after the death.

    Without going into the details, important is to know that you need to have plan what to do with the body right away when death came, and some backup plan, and maybe one more backup plan.
    For example you may be not able to go out and burn or bury the body for day or more.

    #10288
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Insightful information. Thanks!

    #10295
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Selco, Here in South Florida it will happen fast. I see a problem in a SHTF. Many will not burn or bury the bodies. They will kill and keep going so the streets will be full of dead bodies which will bring wild animals and diseases.

    Many will not feed they dogs so there will be a lot of wild dogs.

    #10301
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    In the Siberian Gulags , they had what they called the buddy system , for those attempting to escape ………the reason for this was because it was understood that one of the two people would die out there …………and the surviving buddy would have food in the other one . Is that grim or what ?

    #10304
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Dealing with Contagious diseases what would you suggest for a every day joe to get to be better prepared? I guess I should add that it would likely have to be not online. And that could cover even the lowest of income homes? As where I live the area has abundant low income families and elderly, who dont have internet or phones

    When the H1N1 virus was here, it was suggested.
    Stay away from clinics, and hospitals.
    Keep hand sanitizer, and use it.
    hospital masks were given out.

    any other ideas?

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #10307
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Gypsy – I thought this was good/useful:

    ‘Protecting yourself and others

    In general, influenza viruses are spread in two ways:

    Respiratory droplets from an infected person’s coughs or sneezes (these droplets generally travel less than one metre); and
    Touching contaminated surfaces (including hands) and then touching your mouth, nose or eyes.

    People may be contagious from one day before they develop symptoms to up to seven days after they get sick, although contagiousness declines rapidly after five days.

    Children, especially younger children, might be contagious for longer periods.

    Flu viruses can survive on some hard surfaces for up to two days. You should regularly clean frequently touched surfaces such as door handles, taps, tables, benches and fridge doors. Flu viruses can be inactivated and removed with normal household detergents.

    Flu viruses can survive on unwashed hands for 30 minutes, and on cloth, paper and tissues for up to 12 hours. This is why it is important to always wash your hands after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose, and to dispose of used tissues in a bin straight away.

    Respiratory droplet and contact spread are the major modes of transmission in the community, but specific procedures within the medical setting may lead to generation of aerosols (particles suspended in the atmosphere), requiring specific precautions in these settings.

    The best protection you can afford yourself and others is to get vaccinated against the pandemic influenza. This will reduce the chances of you getting and transmitting the disease. However, the development of a pandemic vaccine takes time, during which the virus may already be circulating in the community and even people who have been vaccinated can pass the virus on if they touch objects contaminated by an infected person.

    You can minimise the spread of the pandemic influenza in your household and in the community by maintaining good household and personal hygiene, avoiding close contact from others (at least 1 metre apart) if you or they are ill, and covering your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing.

    Top of Page

    Five simple ways to prevent the spread of pandemic influenza:
    1. Cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough

    The flu virus can travel through the air when a person coughs or sneezes. When you cough or sneeze you should:

    Turn away from other people
    Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve
    Use disposable tissues rather than a handkerchief (which could store the virus)
    Put used tissues into the nearest bin, rather than a pocket or handbag
    Wash your hands, or use an alcohol hand rub, as soon as possible afterwards.

    People who are sick should always be encouraged to wear a surgical mask to contain the virus and help prevent its spread.

    2. Wash your hands

    Wash your hands regularly with soap and water, or using an alcohol-based product (gels, rinses, foams) that doesn’t require water – even when they aren’t visibly dirty. This is the single most effective way of killing the flu virus. Either of these methods is effective, with products available at supermarkets and pharmacies.

    Always wash your hands:

    • after you’ve been to the toilet
    • after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose
    • after being in contact with someone who has a cold or flu
    • before touching your eyes, nose or mouth
    • before preparing food and eating.

    To wash your hands properly
    Set of 4 images depicting correct procedure for washing hands.
    3. Don’t share personal items

    The flu virus can spread when someone touches an object with the virus on it and then touches their eyes, nose or mouth.

    If a member of your household has the flu:

    keep personal items, such as towels, bedding and toothbrushes separate
    do not share eating and drinking utensils, food or drinks.

    4. Clean surfaces

    Flu viruses can live on surfaces for several hours. If a member of your household has the flu, you should regularly clean surfaces such as tables, benches, fridge doors and door knobs with soap and water or detergent.

    5. Avoid close contact with others if you are unwell with flu

    Keeping your distance from others by standing or sitting back (at least one metre apart, where possible) will help reduce the chances of spreading the flu virus between people.

    While you are unwell you should remain at home and avoid going out in public. If you are unwell, you should not go to work or school or attend other public or crowded gatherings, and avoid taking public transport. If you need to use public transport, it is recommended that you wear a mask to contain the virus.

    Do not visit people who have the flu unless it is absolutely necessary.

    If a member of your household has the flu, he or she should be separated from other members of the family if possible, and be encouraged to wear a surgical mask. If you are caring for someone who has the flu, you too should wear a mask and gloves when in close contact to protect yourself from catching the flu.

    Antivirals and vaccines may have some effectiveness in preventing the development of infection in people exposed to the influenza virus.

    Top of Page

    Personal protective equipment
    If a pandemic becomes widespread in the community, authorities may encourage people who are not sick to wear a mask or other covering for the nose and mouth to help protect them from catching the virus. It is particularly important for people who are sneezing or coughing to also wear a mask if possible to prevent the spread of infection to others.

    If you run a business or community organisation, you might want to take proactive measures to help stop the spread of infection by providing tissues and ‘no-touch’ bins, soap or alcohol-based products for your clients, and post up signs to remind people about good hygiene practices. Posters and information brochures can be downloaded from this web site.

    If you own birds
    Many people keep poultry and other types of birds, and while the risk of bird flu reaching our shores is low, all owners need to remain vigilant for signs of disease. There are simple steps you can take to help protect your birds from all diseases, including bird flu. See the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (external link) for more information. Remember always to practise good hygiene and wash your hands with soap and water after handling birds.

    Preparing your household
    There are several things you can do now that will help you be prepared, should a pandemic occur:

    Have plans in place for if you and your family have to stay at home for a week or so during a pandemic. Talk to your family and friends about this
    If you live alone; are a single parent of young children; or are the only person caring for a frail or disabled person, think of someone you could call upon for help if you become very ill with the flu. Discuss with the person what help you might need and how that could best be provided
    Think of someone you could call on to care for your children if their school or daycare centre were to close during a pandemic but you still had to go to work. Discuss this with them
    Have a telephone network for you and the people who live close by
    Put the phone number of your family doctor and your state or territory health information line in a prominent place
    Think of someone who could help you with food and other supplies if you and your family were sick and could not leave the house
    Teach children about hand washing and cough etiquette
    Think about supplies you might need in a pandemic.’

    HTH

    #10308
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Gypsy,
    Tyvec suits, gloves, & googles. Use and burn. Of course they all cost money. Tyvec suits will keep almost any contaminate off you including radioactive dust.

    #10309
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    If a contagious diseases were to hit the U. S. we the preppers will be the best prepared. We do not have to go get food at any stores, we have saved many of the meds and all other preps to protect us as best as possible.

    Masks, gloves and plastic to cover windows and doors and a very good A/C filter. There are many other things list here but we all have a lot and are prepared.

    #10318
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    What I am looking at is, What a non prepper could do at the very least to help themselves last min. And possibly a list of what friends can be given.

    • Masks.
    • Gloves
    • Plastic for covering doors and windows
    • Bleach
    • paper towels
    • Lysol Disinfectant Spray

    Print out of Tweva list.

    Thanks 1974, Freedom, Tweva

    Other then you guys and my family no one knows what we have and I want to keep it that way.Our preps are our preps and we don’t share. When the H1N1 hit Newfoundland, four cases where found in my area. When it was posted for everyone to get there shots, I called them and I was currently preg with my youngest. The nurse told me to stay home as the shot they had wasn’t safe for me. But she would come to my house with the one that was the next morning as she was going to have to go to the next town and pick up the shots that were safe. I was then instructed to stay in the house and not leave till she came and delivered the shot herself. And other then family who had been given the shot not to allow anyone in. So the husband quarantined us off at that point. We learned then to prep for these things.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #10321
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Gypsy, you did the right thing! Now you will be even better prepared.

    #10649
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    In some serious SHTF event (real collapse, large scale terrorist attack, pandemic or similar) bodies will be problem, simply because increasing number of bodies simply will overwhelm dealing with them.

    Mass burning of the bodies sounds like good and fast way, but keep in mind that still require some level of organization, and that is exactly what is missing in large scale SHTF.

    At the end, it may come to the sad and gruesome fact that I mention before, you will be able to take care (hopefully) only for things inside your home, everything else is simply outside of your influence.
    This here goes mostly for urban areas.

    #10653
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Selco, that is what will happen in the urban areas, bodies from people just dieing of hunger, dieing of being shot and of diseases from all the infections, and no clean water.

    There will be wild animals and wild dogs that will attach you. It will take a long time to clean up. It will look like a war zone.

    #10672
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    What our group discussed was using one of the buildings here and just stacking the bodies inside and nail up the windows and doors. Burning would take up too many resources (time, people, wood etc) and would attract too much attention from the smoke at day and flames at night. Critters will be attracted by the scent but by then the smell will just mingle with the other foul smelling items.

     

    Robin

    #10681
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    The smell is one of the problems but the real problem is diseases that may start from the decaying bodies.

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